Thomas Montague (1869 - 1944)

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Thomas Montague
1869 - 1944
Born
c. 1869
Death
November 15, 1944
Richmond County, New York United States
Summary
Thomas Montague was born c. 1869. He died on November 15, 1944 in New York at 75 years of age.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Thomas Montague
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Thomas Montague died on in Richmond County, New York United States
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Thomas Montague was born
Thomas Montague died on in Richmond County, New York United States
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Thomas Montague died on November 15, 1944 in New York at 75 years old. He was born c. 1869. There is no information about Thomas's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Thomas' lifetime.

In 1869, in the year that Thomas Montague was born, on May 10th, North America's first transcontinental railroad was completed at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory, by driving a "golden spike" or the "last spike" of the line. The spike was driven by Leland Stanford and is now displayed at Stanford University.

In 1889, when he was 20 years old, on May 31st, the South Fork Dam collapsed. Located in western Pennsylvania, the dam failed - sending more than 20 million tons of water into the towns below it. The flood killed more than 2,200 people in and around Johnstown. The newly formed Red Cross responded to the disaster.

In 1929, at the age of 60 years old, Thomas was alive when American Samoa officially became a U.S. territory. Although a part of the United States since 1900, the Ratification Act of 1929 vested "all civil, judicial, and military powers in the President of the United States of America".

In 1930, he was 61 years old when on August 6th, N.Y. Supreme Court Judge Joseph Crater went through papers in his office, destroyed some of them, withdrew all his money from the bank - $5,150, sold his stock, met friends at a restaurant for dinner and disappeared after getting into a taxi (or walking down the street - his friends' testimony later changed). His disappearance was reported to the police on September 3rd - almost a month later. His wife didn't know what happened, his fellow Justices had no idea, and his mistresses (he had several) said that they didn't know. While his disappearance was front page news, his fate was never discovered and after 40 years the case was closed, still without knowing if Crater was dead or alive.

In 1944, in the year of Thomas Montague's passing, on June 22nd, the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, called the G.I. Bill, was signed into law, pushed through by the veteran's organizations. Benefits provided for veterans to return to school (high school, vocational school, or college), obtain low interest home mortgages and low interest business loans, and (if needed) one year of unemployment insurance. Since most returning vets immediately found work, less than 20% of the unemployment benefits were distributed.

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