Ward Pire (1884 - 1962)

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Ward Pire
1884 - 1962
Born
May 21, 1884
Death
September 1962
Last Known Residence
Pennsylvania
Summary
Ward Pire was born on May 21, 1884. He died in September 1962 at 78 years old. We know that Ward Pire had been residing in Pennsylvania.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Ward Pire
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Ward Pire passed away in September 1962 at age 78. He was born on May 21, 1884. There is no information about Ward's family or relationships. We know that Ward Pire had been residing in Pennsylvania.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ward's lifetime.

In 1884, in the year that Ward Pire was born, on May 1st, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions - a US association - first resolved that "eight hours shall constitute a legal day's labour from and after May 1, 1886, and that we recommend to labour organisations throughout this jurisdiction that they so direct their laws as to conform to this resolution by the time named." Previously, workdays would consist of 10 to 16 hours a day - 6 days a week. It would take years before the 8 hour workday became common practice - and longer before it became a law.

In 1899, Ward was only 15 years old when on February 14th, the first voting machines were approved by Congress for use in federal elections. Several states were already using voting machines in their elections and the Federal government was finally convinced of their safety and accuracy.

In 1904, when he was 20 years old, the first underground line of the New York City subway system opened. London's underground system was opened in 1863 and Boston opened one in 1897, but New York quickly became the largest system in the U.S. More than 100,000 people paid 5 cents to ride under Manhattan that first day.

In 1929, Ward was 45 years old when on March 4th, Herbert Hoover became the 31st President of the United States. Early in his presidency, the October stock market crash - "Black Tuesday" - occurred, which lead to the Great Depression. None of his economic policies were able to make a dent in the Depression. This lead to one term and the election of Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt winning the 1933 election in a landslide.

In 1962, in the year of Ward Pire's passing, on October 1st, African-American James H. Meredith, escorted by federal marshals, registered at the University of Mississippi - becoming the first African-American student admitted to the segregated college. He had been inspired by President Kennedy's inaugural address to apply for admission.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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