William Farrow (1892 - 1920)

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William Farrow
1892 - 1920
Born
c. 1892
Death
November 29, 1920
Summary
William Farrow was born c. 1892. He died on November 29, 1920 at 28 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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William Farrow
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William Farrow
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William Farrow was born
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William Farrow was born
William Farrow died on
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Imtarfa Military Cemetery Iv. 1b. 3. in Malta
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Military Service

Service number: 5999230
Rank: Private
Regiment: Essex Regiment
Unit/ship/squadron: 2nd Bn.

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William Farrow died on November 29, 1920 at 28 years old. He was buried in Imtarfa Military Cemetery Iv. 1b. 3., Malta. He was born c. 1892. We are unaware of information about William's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during William's lifetime.

In 1892, in the year that William Farrow was born, on January 1st, Ellis Island opened to process immigrants. 700 passed through on the first day - in the first year, 450,000 were processed. The processing center was originally a 3 story wooden building - with outbuildings - that burned down a few years later.

In 1903, by the time he was merely 11 years old, the silent film, The Great Train Robbery opened. Although it was filmed in Milltown, New Jersey, it was a Western. Twelve minutes long, the film used a lot of innovative techniques - some scenes were hand colored and composite editing, on-location shooting, and frequent camera movement were used. Its budget was $150 (about $4000 currently) and was the most popular film until 1915 when Birth of a Nation was released.

In 1909, he was 17 years old when Polish physician and medical researcher Paul Ehrlich found a cure for syphilis, which was a prevalent (but undiscussed) disease. He found that an arsenic compound completely cured syphilis within 3 weeks.

In 1910, at the age of 18 years old, William was alive when Angel Island, which is in San Francisco Bay, became the immigration center for Asians entering U.S. It was often referred to as "The Ellis Island of the West". Due to restrictive laws against Chinese immigration, many immigrants spent years on the island.

In 1920, in the year of William Farrow's passing, on January 1, over 6000 people were arrested and put in prison because they were suspected of being communists. . Many had to be released in a few weeks and only 3 guns were found in their homes. The U.S. Department of Justice "red hunt" netted thousands of "radicals" and suspected "communists" and aliens were deported. But the "hunt" ended after Attorney General Palmer forecast a massive radical uprising on May Day and the day passed without incident.

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