William Schermer (1893 - 1966)

A photo of William Schermer
Add photo
William Schermer
1893 - 1966
Born
May 13, 1893
Death
August 1966
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16509
Summary
William Schermer was born on May 13, 1893. He died in August 1966 at age 73. We know that William Schermer had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16509.
Updated: February 6, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Show & Tell His Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that William is always remembered.
Update biobiography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell William's life so that he is always remembered.

Biography
William Schermer
Most commonly known as
William Schermer
Full name
Other names or aliases
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16509
Last known residence
Male
Gender
William Schermer was born on
Birth
William Schermer died in
Death
William Schermer was born on
William Schermer died in
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Looking for a different William Schermer?
View other bios of people named William Schermer

William's Family Tree

Parent
Parent
William Schermer
Partner
Child
Partner
Child
Sibling

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add William's family friends, and his friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

Pictures really do say a thousand words. Share photos of William and the Schermer family.
Photo

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about William.

Cancel

Share William's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

William Schermer died in August 1966 at 73 years old. He was born on May 13, 1893. There is no information about William's immediate family. We know that William Schermer had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16509.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during William's lifetime.

In 1893, in the year that William Schermer was born, on March 4th, Grover Cleveland became the 24th President of the United States. On July 1st, President Cleveland was operated on for a non-cancerous tumor in his mouth. He chose to have the operation secretly because he didn't want to worsen the financial depression that was occurring at the time.

In 1914, he was 21 years old when in August, the world's first red and green traffic lights were installed at the corner of East 105th Street and Euclid Avenue in Cleveland Ohio. The electric traffic light had been invented by a policeman in Salt Lake City Utah in 1912.

In 1935, at the age of 42 years old, William was alive when the BOI's name (the Bureau of Investigation) was changed to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) and it officially became a separate agency with the Department of Justice. J. Edgar Hoover, the Chief of the BOI, continued in his office and became the first Director of the FBI. The FBI's responsibility is to "detect and prosecute crimes against the United States".

In 1946, by the time he was 53 years old, pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock's book "The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care" was published. It sold half a million copies in the first six months. Aside from the Bible, it became the best selling book of the 20th century. A generation of Baby Boomers were raised by the advice of Dr. Spock.

In 1966, in the year of William Schermer's passing, on September 8th, the first Star Trek episode, "The Man Trap," was broadcast on NBC. The plot concerned a creature that sucked salt from human bodies. The original series only aired for 3 seasons due to low ratings.

Other William Schermers

Other Schermers

Other Bios

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top