Cassie V. (Tucker) Brown family

Description:
A photo of Cassie V. (Tucker) Brown cleaning house! When Cassie V. Tucker was born on August 22, 1881, in Hampton, Iowa, her father, William, was 31 and her mother, Vienna, was 26. She had one son with Frank L. Brown. She died on January 12, 1958, in Roundup, Montana, at the age of 76, and was buried in Klein, Montana.
Date & Place: in Montana United States
People:
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Unknown - Unknown
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Aug 22, 1881 - Jan 12, 1958
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Updated May 01, 2019

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Laura Terry
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Comments

Ancient Faces
447 favorites
Snow on the ground . . . broom in hand. OMG, we have it so easy today! She must have been a tough lady - she lived to be 76. Maybe it was all that exercise?
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Lynda Lerum
wow. good size house, front door and window, and two chimneys, not being facetious, looks comfortable for then.
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Veronica Nichols
That is what I was thinking. Paned windows? They were doing good.
May 01, 2019 ·
Lynda Lerum
Veronica Nichols Indeed. So many of us compare it to today and you cannot.
May 01, 2019 ·
KellieAnne Foreman
7 favorites
76 is not that old
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Pat Rowland Carothers
Nope. I've seen many, men and women, from that era who lived into their 90's. Some in my own lines.
May 01, 2019 ·
AncientFaces
Well, from my perspective it's pretty young. LOL But I'm not sure if I had to live like she did that I'd think that way now.
May 01, 2019 ·
Bernadette Walsh
Was in those days
May 01, 2019 ·
Marilynn Marlow
For then it was old....90's then was incredible
May 01, 2019 ·
KellieAnne Foreman
7 favorites
I disagree it was incredibly old - even in those days
May 01, 2019 ·
Lynda Lerum
Not today, but back then 76 was extremely old and to have lived that long was an achievement. oh yes it was.
May 01, 2019 ·
Vallerie Fletcher
My Mom is going to be 80 in a few months and she can run rings around ME! My aunt is 86 and she is really energetic and spry. Only thing with HER is that she decided to stop driving about 6 years ago after her first and only auto accident because it shook her up too badly.
May 01, 2019 ·
Vallerie Fletcher
To add a bit more: It was the AVERAGE age that was lower. This was due to a great deal of infant mortality and early childhood mortality due to LACK of Antibiotics and no knowledge of sterilization practices in medicine and such. If a person got an infection back then - not good. It was NOT that people simply faded away earlier.
May 01, 2019 ·
AncientFaces
Vallerie Fletcher Don't forget death in childbirth. Common. My own great-grandmother was buried with the baby - her 13th pregnancy. No birth control.
May 01, 2019 ·
Pat Rowland Carothers
There is a lot of info on this family on Ancestry.com. Frank died in 1971, and Eddie was Clarence Leo "Eddie" Brown, 1907-1994. According to the 1910 Census, he was adopted.
May 01, 2019 ·
Gloria Hayes
5 favorites
My Granny was born in Georgia in the 1890's, I loved her to death, could listen to her all day- and I have to share an observation based on what I know to be true... The "snow" is probably sand; they kept the yard right around the house swept, no grass was allowed to grow at all. This discouraged snakes, vermin and other pests. Here in the South that was imperative. Another reason I am sure it is sand is that there is no snow on the rooftop, no smoke from the chimney, and the door is propped,standing open.
May 01, 2019 · Reply
AncientFaces
Could be - although this was Montana.
May 01, 2019 ·
KellieAnne Foreman
7 favorites
AncientFaces where I live now. We had a blizzard on Sunday and it was UGLY
May 01, 2019 ·
KellieAnne Foreman
7 favorites
OMG I actually live a few miles from where this photo was taken
May 01, 2019 ·
Lorraine Bennett
I sweep my snow on the walk.
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Marilynn Marlow
And she has on her good apron!!
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Vallerie Fletcher
They had a comfortable living for the standards at that time. Windows had GLASS panes! She had a husband AND a son to help her around the place...and they could even have a PET. Surely upper middle class and the envy of many!
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Ree Young
236 favorites
That was definitely not upper middle class! And that wasn't just a pet. That was a working dog even though it was dearly loved. It was very common for families to have dogs and cats. Pets for a middle class or even low income family were not unusual. The dogs were protection, used for helping with keeping the cows, herding sheep, accompanying the hunter, and pulling small wagons. Cats were essential to keep rats and mice populations down.

It was 1890 before the first commercial dog biscuit was produced in the US. Canned dog food came about after WWI when working horses died and people could get horsemeat to feed their dogs and cats.

(Actually, so did people! The immigrants coming over in steerage were fed horse meat stew on the long voyage. My dad told me when he immigrated from Italy with his mother and two younger siblings, that's what they were given to eat. He said when his mother found out what it was, she couldn't touch it and lived on biscuits the whole trip. My dad said, though, that he happily ate his share and hers as well!)

Working pets in the country got sc***s and the cats got what they caught, plus a little milk as a treat. No vet bills or shots because there were few vets, even in cities, and the vets out in the rural areas were primarily for large animals. No vaccines either. So, it was not expensive to have a pet; it was just about essential!

Glass windows were used by the late 1800s. Even some sod houses on the prairies (where trees were sparse but grass was plentiful) had thick glass windows unless you were extremely poor. Then, yes, you might have had greased paper for your window.

My mother was a farmer's daughter, born in 1908, and the photos of the farm house had glass windows. The family was by no means upper middle class.

I believe you are thinking of an earlier time. Glass was always fragile for shipping, but it could be saved up for and bought because it was a one-time purchase. The glass was thicker, and sash windows were still very new and mostly found in city homes for the actual upper middle class. Some of the settlers who came west on the wagon traiins carried panes of glass with them, well-wrapped, but that was because they could get it cheaply enough in the city. Once out in the wilderness or even in small towns, they would have had glass windows, but it wasn't because they had a higher income status.

This family does look well-fed, but not what the upper middle class was considered then. The curtains were likely sewn by that lady, as was her apron, and they were handled carefully because, though not in want, they still had to be frugal. And we don't know what those curtains were made of. They has frills, but you can do that with potato sacks, plain cotton, or even using old sheets and dresses.

Yep, she had a husband, but we don't know how much older he might have been than she was or how long he lived. My grandfather died in 1922 of double pneumonia...he was only 54. One of my mother's older brothers nearly died from a gash in his leg when he slipped with the ax while chopping wood.

And we don't know how long her son lived. Childhood disease were rife, and a simple cold or cut could take the life of a healthy child. My dad (who was born in 1901) lost to siblings to measles. Another of my mother's brothers died in the 1918 influenza epidemic.

Those two pipes are not chimneys...they're stove pipes. One for the cookstove and one for the cast iron stove for heat. that was a bit of a luxury, but heating like that required a lot of work (I hated with with just a wood stove for about 30 years, up until a couple years ago when it got to be to hard on my arthritis. And cooking with that cookstove in the warm months was pretty rough...plus no refrigeration. The actual upper middle class had, by then, iceboxes. These folks did not.

I'm not saying this family had it as rough as some did, but they were just at middle class by even the standards of that time period.
May 01, 2019 ·
AncientFaces
Ree Young My grandmother told me that she cooked all the pet food in the 1930's. Big pots of it. My Mom kept bringing animals home - they had several dogs and even more cats. They were wealthy but grandma fed all of the pets herself.
May 01, 2019 ·
Vallerie Fletcher
Thank you so very much! Yes, that is true about the dog being a working dog. I think this dog is so sweet in this photo! The dog is with his or her young lad! As far as horse meat, my mother told me that she saw it in the grocery store here during WW2 era. My great grand parents were share croppers in the rural south, and this house is truly fine compared to theirs... but again, materials varied according to geography. I truly enjoy looking at this and reading the above comments and those of others below. Wonderful discussion.
May 01, 2019 ·
Dorothy Aichele Conway
Pretty apron and pretty curtains at the window!
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Joy Cairncross
Dorothy Aichele Conway yes...a lady with much pride...it wasn't a house she made it a home...
May 01, 2019 ·
Ramona Lopez
They were happy n contented those days!
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Zandra Mettams
Definitely made of tough stuff... 👍
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Mike Stephens
I wonder how old she is in this photo? I say 40
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Theresa Padovano
Nice picture 💖🍷🌼
May 01, 2019 · Reply
Drusilla Jean Newton
May 02, 2019 · Reply
Maureen Freeson
This is a super picture,looks Dutch to me,she has a nice pair of ankles,I am 81yrs,and my old Gran used to say, "Hard work never killed anyone"and if one said different,look out,She was on the war path.!!!MO
May 02, 2019 · Reply
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