Amelia B (Manias) Fowler (1915 - 1988)

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Amelia B (Manias ) Fowler
1915 - 1988
Born
November 23, 1915
Sumter County, Alabama United States
Death
November 22, 1988
Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama United States
Last Known Residence
28th ave north in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 35207
Summary
Amelia B (Manias) Fowler was born on November 23, 1915 in Alabama. She was born into the Manias family and married into the Fowler family. She was born to Jerry Manias and Lula Manias. Amelia died on November 22, 1988 in Birmingham, Alabama at 72 years of age.
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Updated: March 21, 2021
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She was kind , loving and beautiful. She reared 9 children after her husband passed. She loved Jehovah God and Jesus.
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Biography
Amelia B (Manias) Fowler
Most commonly known as
Amelia B (Manias ) Fowler
Full name
Other names or aliases
28th ave north in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 35207
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Amelia Fowler was born on in Sumter County, Alabama United States
Birth
Amelia Fowler died on in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama United States
Death
Amelia Fowler was born on in Sumter County, Alabama United States
Amelia Fowler died on in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama United States
Birth
Death
congestive heart failure
Cause of death
Heritage

Ethnicity & Lineage

Black

Nationality & Locations

United States
Childhood

Education

High School

Religion

Jehovah Witness

Baptism

Adulthood

Professions

Seamstress

Personal Life

The organization of Jehovah witnesses was a large part of her life. She was a minister for Christ.

Military Service

No

Average Age

Life Expectancy

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Member since 2014
Jacqueline Fowler
Jacqueline Fowler
3 favorites
Jacqueline Fowler commented
She was born into the Manias family. Jerry Manias was her father and Lula was her mother.
Jan 10, 2016 · Reply
Member since 2021
Jacqueline Fowler
21 favorites
Jacqueline Fowler commented
Who are her mothers parents? Are there any relatives on her mother side still alive?
Mar 21 · Reply
Member since 2021
Jacqueline Fowler
21 favorites
Jacqueline Fowler commented
That she loved all nine of her children and helped all her grandchildren. She absolutely loved God!
Mar 21 · Reply
Member since 2021
Jacqueline Fowler
21 favorites
Jacqueline Fowler commented
Jacqueline is the daughter of Amelia Manias Fowler and Robert Fowler.
Henson is the name of Jacquelines grandchildren.
Mar 21 · Reply

Share Amelia's obituary or write your own to preserve her legacy.

Amelia B (Manias) Fowler died on November 22, 1988 in Birmingham, Alabama at 72 years old. She was born on November 23, 1915 in Alabama. She was born to Jerry Manias and Lula Manias.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Amelia's lifetime.

In 1915, in the year that Amelia B (Manias) Fowler was born, the Germans first used poison gas as a weapon at the second Battle of Ypres during World War I. While noxious gases had been used since ancient times, this was the first use of poisonous gas - in this case, lethal chlorine gas - in modern war. Subsequently, the French and British - as well as the United States when they entered World War 1 - developed and used lethal gas in war.

In 1944, when she was 29 years old, on June 22nd, the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, called the G.I. Bill, was signed into law, pushed through by the veteran's organizations. Benefits provided for veterans to return to school (high school, vocational school, or college), obtain low interest home mortgages and low interest business loans, and (if needed) one year of unemployment insurance. Since most returning vets immediately found work, less than 20% of the unemployment benefits were distributed.

In 1953, when she was 38 years old, on July 27th, the Korean Armistice Agreement was signed. The Armistice was to last until "a final peaceful settlement is achieved". No peaceful settlement has ever been agreed upon.

In 1971, when she was 56 years old, on May 3rd, 10,000 federal troops, 5,100 officers of the D.C. Metropolitan Police, 2,000 members of the D.C. National Guard, and federal agents assembled in Washington DC to prevent an estimated 10,000 Vietnam War protesters from marching. President Nixon (who was in California) refused to give federal employees the day off and they had to navigate the police and protesters, adding to the confusion. By the end of a few days of protest, 12,614 people had been arrested - making it the largest mass arrest in US history.

In 1988, in the year of Amelia B (Manias) Fowler's passing, on December 21st, Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie Scotland. The explosion killed all 259 people on board and another 11 on the ground. The flight had left Heathrow Airport in London less than an hour before, on its way to New York. After an exhaustive (and long) investigation it came to be believed that two individuals from Libya had planted the bomb.

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