Andrew Bradford (1890 - 1984)

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Andrew Bradford
1890 - 1984
Born
November 16, 1890
Death
April 1984
Last Known Residence
Hondo, Medina County, Texas 78861
Summary
Andrew Bradford was born on November 16, 1890. He died in April 1984 at age 93. We know that Andrew Bradford had been residing in Hondo, Medina County, Texas 78861.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Andrew Bradford
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Hondo, Medina County, Texas 78861
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Andrew Bradford died in April 1984 at 93 years old. He was born on November 16, 1890. We are unaware of information about Andrew's family or relationships. We know that Andrew Bradford had been residing in Hondo, Medina County, Texas 78861.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Andrew's lifetime.

In 1890, in the year that Andrew Bradford was born, on October 9th, in Satory, France, the first fixed-wing, steam powered aircraft flew. "Ader Éole" flew, uncontrolled, for about 160 ft. at a height of just under 8 inches off the ground.

In 1931, Andrew was 41 years old when in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1943, Andrew was 53 years old when on June 20th through June 22nd, the Detroit Race Riot erupted at Belle Isle Park. The rioting spread throughout the city (made worse by false rumors of attacks on blacks and whites) and resulted in the deployment of 6,000 Federal troops. 34 people were killed, (25 of them black) - mostly by white police or National Guardsmen, 433 were wounded (75 percent of them black) and an estimated $2 million of property was destroyed. The same summer, there were riots in Beaumont, Texas and Harlem, New York.

In 1965, at the age of 75 years old, Andrew was alive when on March 8th, the first US combat troops arrived in Vietnam. The 3500 Marines joined 23,000 "advisors" already in South Vietnam. By the end of the year, 190,000 American soldiers were in the country.

In 1984, in the year of Andrew Bradford's passing, on January 1, "Baby Bells" were created. AT&T had been the provider of telephone service (and equipment) in the United States. The company kept Western Electric, Bell Labs, and AT&T Long Distance. Seven new regional companies (the Baby Bells) covered local telephone service and were separately owned. AT&T lost 70% of its book value due to this move.

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