Andrew M Menser

(1912 - 1996)

A photo of Andrew M Menser
Andrew M Menser
1912 - 1996
Born
September 22, 1912
Death
March 28, 1996
Last Known Residence
Piggott, Clay County, Arkansas 72454
Summary
Andrew M Menser was born on September 22, 1912. He died on March 28, 1996 at age 83. We know that Andrew M Menser had been residing in Piggott, Clay County, Arkansas 72454.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Andrew M Menser
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Andrew M Menser
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Piggott, Clay County, Arkansas 72454
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Andrew M Menser died on March 28, 1996 at age 83. He was born on September 22, 1912. There is no information about Andrew's immediate family. We know that Andrew M Menser had been residing in Piggott, Clay County, Arkansas 72454.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Andrew's lifetime.

In 1912, in the year that Andrew M Menser was born, New Mexico became the 47th state of the Union in January. Previously a province of Mexico, then a territory of the United States and mostly populated by Native Americans and Mexicans, once it became a U.S. territory it was increasingly colonized by European-American settlers. Its population was over 327,000 when it became a state.

In 1923, at the age of only 11 years old, Andrew was alive when on September 1, an earthquake - the Great Kanto earthquake - destroyed one-third of Tokyo. Measuring 7.9 and with a reported duration of between 4 and 10 minutes, casualties totaled about 142,800 deaths, including about 40,000 who went missing and were presumed dead.

In 1935, Andrew was 23 years old when on August 14, the Social Security Act was signed into law. The purpose was to "provide federal assistance to those unable to work". The law established the Social Security Administration whose primary focus was to "provide aid for the elderly, the unemployed, and children". The Act survived many Supreme Court challenges and the Administration continues until today.

In 1965, when he was 53 years old, on March 8th, the first US combat troops arrived in Vietnam. The 3500 Marines joined 23,000 "advisors" already in South Vietnam. By the end of the year, 190,000 American soldiers were in the country.

In 1996, in the year of Andrew M Menser's passing, on April 3rd, Theodore Kaczynski (nicknamed the Unabomber) was arrested. His mailed or hand-delivered bombs, sent between 1978 and 1995, killed three people and injured 23 others. Diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, Kaczynski is serving 8 life sentences without the possibility of parole.

Other Mensers

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Jan 15, 1887 - Mar 1963 1887 - 1963
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Aug 30, 1910 - Jan 1980 1910 - 1980
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Apr 6, 1906 - Nov 1975 1906 - 1975
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Jan 16, 1909 - May 14, 1998 1909 - 1998
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Jul 17, 1915 - Aug 9, 1997 1915 - 1997
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Feb 8, 1894 - Apr 1969 1894 - 1969
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May 28, 1921 - Mar 13, 2000 1921 - 2000
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Aug 18, 1912 - Jun 1971 1912 - 1971
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Jan 11, 1933 - May 1985 1933 - 1985
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Feb 4, 1911 - Feb 4, 2001 1911 - 2001
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Feb 6, 1906 - Nov 1985 1906 - 1985
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Apr 10, 1893 - Apr 1, 1990 1893 - 1990
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Aug 3, 1897 - Nov 1973 1897 - 1973
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Jan 21, 1904 - Sep 1983 1904 - 1983
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Aug 15, 1906 - Mar 26, 1999 1906 - 1999
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Sep 11, 1924 - Aug 12, 1996 1924 - 1996
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Apr 12, 1915 - Sep 1, 2007 1915 - 2007
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Oct 16, 1919 - Feb 27, 1995 1919 - 1995
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Jul 17, 1887 - Nov 1966 1887 - 1966

Other Bios

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Jul 4, 1892 - Dec 1969 1892 - 1969
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Oct 28, 1901 - Oct 1979 1901 - 1979
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Jan 27, 1917 - Mar 26, 2009 1917 - 2009
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Jul 30, 1887 - Oct 1965 1887 - 1965
Bio
Feb 5, 1883 - Nov 1969 1883 - 1969
Bio
Nov 22, 1890 - Dec 1985 1890 - 1985
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Dec 29, 1912 - Dec 31, 1987 1912 - 1987
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Jan 8, 1903 - Mar 1, 1988 1903 - 1988
Bio
Jun 23, 1911 - Oct 1979 1911 - 1979
Bio
Jun 13, 1894 - Jan 1973 1894 - 1973
Bio
Nov 6, 1890 - Jan 1979 1890 - 1979
Bio
Jun 13, 1895 - Oct 1961 1895 - 1961
Bio
Jan 19, 1899 - Apr 1966 1899 - 1966
Bio
Sep 1, 1915 - Oct 22, 1997 1915 - 1997
Bio
Aug 13, 1911 - Oct 1968 1911 - 1968
Bio
Jul 13, 1905 - Aug 1980 1905 - 1980
Bio
Aug 23, 1906 - Jun 1967 1906 - 1967
Bio
Oct 20, 1907 - May 1975 1907 - 1975
Bio
May 14, 1917 - Aug 1979 1917 - 1979
Bio
Oct 11, 1913 - Dec 1984 1913 - 1984
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