Betty K Ester (1915 - 2004)

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Betty K Ester
1915 - 2004
Born
May 30, 1915
Death
February 6, 2004
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
Summary
Betty K Ester was born on May 30, 1915. She died on February 6, 2004 at 88 years old. We know that Betty K Ester had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Betty K Ester
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Betty K Ester
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
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Betty K Ester passed away on February 6, 2004 at age 88. She was born on May 30, 1915. There is no information about Betty's immediate family. We know that Betty K Ester had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Betty's lifetime.

In 1915, in the year that Betty K Ester was born, the Germans first used poison gas as a weapon at the second Battle of Ypres during World War I. While noxious gases had been used since ancient times, this was the first use of poisonous gas - in this case, lethal chlorine gas - in modern war. Subsequently, the French and British - as well as the United States when they entered World War 1 - developed and used lethal gas in war.

In 1947, she was 32 years old when in June, the Marshall Plan was proposed to help European nations recover economically from World War II. It passed the conservative Republican Congress in March of 1948. After World War I, the economic devastation of Germany caused by burdensome reparations payments led to the rise of Hitler. The Allies didn't want this to happen again and the Marshall Plan was devised to make sure that those conditions didn't arise again.

In 1957, when she was 42 years old, on October 4th, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik I, the first man made earth-orbiting satellite - and triggered the Space Race. Sputnik I was only 23 inches in diameter and had no tracking equipment, only 4 antennas, but it had a big impact.

In 1964, by the time she was 49 years old, in June, three young civil rights workers - Andrew Goodman and Mickey Schwerner from New York City, and James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi - were kidnapped and murdered in Mississippi. Working with "Freedom Summer", they were registering African-Americans to vote in the Southern states. Their bodies were found two months later. Although it was discovered that the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, the Neshoba County Sheriff's Office and the Philadelphia, Mississippi Police Department were involved, only 7 men were convicted and served less than six years.

In 1971, at the age of 56 years old, Betty was alive when in March, Intel shipped the first microprocessor to Busicom, a Japanese manufacturer of calculators. The microprocessor has since allowed computers to become smaller and faster, leading to smaller and more versatile handheld devices, home computers, and supercomputers.

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