Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg

(1858 - 1930)

A photo of Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg
Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg
1858 - 1930
Born
1858
Death
1930
Kyneton, Macedon Ranges Shire County, VIC Australia 3444
Summary
Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg, mother to 1 child, was born in 1858. She was born into the Beeching family and married into the Fagg family. She was born to James Beeching and Elizabeth (Chapman) Beeching. Eliza's partner was Richard Fagg, and they gave birth to Thomas William Fagg. Eliza died in 1930 in Kyneton, VIC Australia at age 72.
Updated: February 23, 2021
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Biography
Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg
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Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg
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Female
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Eliza Fagg was born in
Birth
Eliza Fagg died in in Kyneton, Macedon Ranges Shire County, VIC Australia 3444
Death
Eliza Fagg was born in
Eliza Fagg died in in Kyneton, Macedon Ranges Shire County, VIC Australia 3444
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Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg

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Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg & Richard Fagg

Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg

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1874 - Jul 12, 1951 1874 - 1951

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Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg, mother to 1 child, passed away in 1930 in Kyneton, VIC Australia at age 72. She was born in 1858. She was born to James Beeching and Elizabeth (Chapman) Beeching. Eliza's partner was Richard Fagg, and they gave birth to Thomas William Fagg.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Eliza's lifetime.

In 1858, in the year that Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg was born, in July, the "Fifty-Niners" began the Pike's Peak Gold Rush. Lasting until about 1861, gold fever hit western Kansas Territory and southwestern Nebraska Territory.

In 1866, she was only 8 years old when Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, businessman, and philanthropist Alfred Nobel invented dynamite in Germany. During his lifetime he held 355 patents, of which dynamite was the most famous. He also established the Nobel Prizes in his will.

In 1901, when she was 43 years old, Edward VII succeeded Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria of England had become Queen in 1837 and reigned until her death in 1901. Her 63 year reign was the longest in history prior to Elizabeth II who recently broke her record. The time during which she led the country was known as the Victorian era and she presided over great changes in the United Kingdom, including the expansion of the British Empire and the Industrial Revolution.

In 1910, Eliza was 52 years old when Halley's comet, which returns past the earth every 75 - 76 years was observed photographically for the first time. Two fortuitous events occurred - photography had been invented since the last time the comet had passed and the comet was relatively close. There was panic because one astronomer claimed that the gas from its tail "would impregnate the atmosphere and possibly snuff out all life on the planet." People bought gas masks, "anti-comet pills" and "anti-comet umbrellas".

In 1930, in the year of Eliza Ellen (Beeching) Fagg's passing, as head of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, William Hays established a code of decency that outlined what was acceptable in films. The public - and government - had felt that films in the '20's had become increasingly risque and that the behavior of its stars was becoming scandalous. Laws were being passed. In response, the heads of the movie studios adopted a voluntary "code", hoping to head off legislation. The first part of the code prohibited "lowering the moral standards of those who see it", called for depictions of the "correct standards of life", and forbade a picture from showing any sort of ridicule towards a law or "creating sympathy for its violation". The second part dealt with particular behavior in film such as homosexuality, the use of specific curse words, and miscegenation.

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