Ethel E Varner (1910 - 1988)

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Ethel E Varner
1910 - 1988
Born
July 30, 1910
Death
September 2, 1988
Last Known Residence
zip code 32021
Summary
Ethel E Varner was born on July 30, 1910. She died on September 2, 1988 at 78 years old. We know that Ethel E Varner had been residing in zip code 32021.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Ethel E Varner
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zip code 32021
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Ethel E Varner died on September 2, 1988 at 78 years old. She was born on July 30, 1910. There is no information about Ethel's family. We know that Ethel E Varner had been residing in zip code 32021.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ethel's lifetime.

In 1910, in the year that Ethel E Varner was born, the Mexican revolution began. Dictator Porfirio Díaz had ruled for 35 years and was nationally unpopular. When elections were held in 1910 and a rigged election kept Diaz in office. The uprising began - and lasted for another 10 years.

In 1927, she was 17 years old when aviator and media darling Charles Lindbergh, age 25, made the first successful solo TransAtlantic flight. "Lucky Lindy" took off from Long Island in New York and flew to Paris, covering  3,600 statute miles and flying for 33 1⁄2-hours. His plane "The Spirit of St. Louis" was a fabric-covered, single-seat, single-engine "Ryan NYP" high-wing monoplane designed by both Lindbergh and the manufacturer's chief engineer.

In 1940, she was 30 years old when on September 16th, the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, was enacted - the first peacetime draft in U.S. history. Men between 21 and 36 were required to register with their draft boards. When World War II began, men between 18 and 45 were subject to service and men up to 65 were required to register.

In 1969, Ethel was 59 years old when on July 20th, the first men walked on the moon. Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. both walked on the moon but it was Armstrong who first stepped on the moon. They fulfilled the promise of President Kennedy's commitment in 1961 to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.

In 1988, in the year of Ethel E Varner's passing, on December 21st, Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie Scotland. The explosion killed all 259 people on board and another 11 on the ground. The flight had left Heathrow Airport in London less than an hour before, on its way to New York. After an exhaustive (and long) investigation it came to be believed that two individuals from Libya had planted the bomb.

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