Felix Bobek (1893 - 1977)

A photo of Felix Bobek
Add photo
Felix Bobek
1893 - 1977
Born
August 15, 1893
Death
February 1977
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16507
Summary
Felix Bobek was born on August 15, 1893. He died in February 1977 at age 83. We know that Felix Bobek had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16507.
Updated: February 6, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Show & Tell His Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that Felix is always remembered.
Update biobiography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell Felix's life so that he is always remembered.

Biography
Felix Bobek
Most commonly known as
Felix Bobek
Full name
Other names or aliases
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16507
Last known residence
Male
Gender
Felix Bobek was born on
Birth
Felix Bobek died in
Death
Felix Bobek was born on
Felix Bobek died in
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Felix's Family Tree

Parent
Parent
Felix Bobek
Partner
Child
Partner
Child
Sibling

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add Felix's family friends, and his friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

Pictures really do say a thousand words. Share photos of Felix and the Bobek family.
Photo

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about Felix.

Cancel

Share Felix's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

Felix Bobek passed away in February 1977 at 83 years of age. He was born on August 15, 1893. There is no information about Felix's immediate family. We know that Felix Bobek had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16507.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Felix's lifetime.

In 1893, in the year that Felix Bobek was born, a songbook, called Song Stories for the Kindergarten, was published by sisters Patty and Mildred Hill. One of the songs included in the book was "Good Morning to All" - later the lyrics were changed and it became "Happy Birthday to You".

In 1902, when he was merely 9 years old, the first Rose Bowl game was played in Pasadena, California. Called the "Tournament East–West football game" at the time, the Michigan Wolverines (East) played the Stanford Indians (West) - the Wolverines won 49 - 0. (The Stanford captain requested an end to the game with 8 minutes remaining.) The Tournament of Roses Parade began in 1890 and the football game began as a way to boost tourism in the area.

In 1927, when he was 34 years old, the first "talkie" (a movie with music, songs, and talking), The Jazz Singer, was released. Al Jolson starred as a cantor's son who instead of following in his father's footsteps as expected, becomes a singer of popular songs. Banished by his father, they reconcile on his father's deathbed. It was a tear-jerker and audiences went wild - especially when they heard the songs. Thus begun the demise of silent films and the rise of "talkies".

In 1959, he was 66 years old when on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

In 1977, in the year of Felix Bobek's passing, on January 21st, President Carter pardoned "draft dodgers" - men who avoided the draft during the Vietnam War. He fulfilled a campaign promise with the pardon. But it only applied to civilian evaders - the estimated 500,000 to 1 million active-duty personnel who went AWOL were not included.

Other Bobeks

Other Bios

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top