Hobart A Picard (1915 - 2010)

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Hobart A Picard
1915 - 2010
Born
February 26, 1915
Death
June 22, 2010
Last Known Residence
Montgomery, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania 17752
Summary
Hobart A Picard was born on February 26, 1915. Hobart died on June 22, 2010 at 95 years old. We know that Hobart A Picard had been residing in Montgomery, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania 17752.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Hobart A Picard
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Montgomery, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania 17752
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Hobart A Picard died on June 22, 2010 at 95 years old. Hobart was born on February 26, 1915. There is no information about Hobart's family. We know that Hobart A Picard had been residing in Montgomery, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania 17752.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Hobart's lifetime.

In 1915, in the year that Hobart A Picard was born, Audrey Munson, playing a model for a sculptor in the film "Inspiration", became the first actress to shed her clothes on screen. Fearing that banning the film would mean that censors would also have to "ban Renaissance art" the film was released, with Munson in the nude scenes and a stand-in doing the acting. (Munson had previously been "America's First Supermodel" and posed nude as the model for many famous artworks.) The film was a hit with audiences.

In 1931, by the time this person was 16 years old, in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1945, this person was 30 years old when on February 19th, US Marines landed on the island of Iwo Jima and the Battle of Iwo Jima began. Lasting 5 weeks, it was some of the bloodiest and fiercest fighting in the Pacific theater during World War II. The occupying Japanese forces were heavily armed and there were 21,000 Japanese soldiers on the island at the beginning of the battle. Only 216 Japanese soldiers were captured afterwards - the rest had been killed in action or committed suicide. 6,800 American soldiers died but the Americans took control of the island.

In 1971, Hobart was 56 years old when in March, Congress passed the Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which lowered the voting age to 18 (from 21). It was a response to the criticism that men could fight at 18, but not vote for the policies and politicians who sent them to war. The states quickly ratified the Amendment and it was signed into law on July 1st by President Richard Nixon.

In 1984, at the age of 69 years old, Hobart was alive when on January 1, "Baby Bells" were created. AT&T had been the provider of telephone service (and equipment) in the United States. The company kept Western Electric, Bell Labs, and AT&T Long Distance. Seven new regional companies (the Baby Bells) covered local telephone service and were separately owned. AT&T lost 70% of its book value due to this move.

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