Howard Tewinkle (1905 - 1970)

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Howard Tewinkle
1905 - 1970
Born
December 5, 1905
Death
November 1970
Last Known Residence
Rochester, Monroe County, New York 14625
Summary
Howard Tewinkle was born on December 5, 1905. He died in November 1970 at age 64. We know that Howard Tewinkle had been residing in Rochester, Monroe County, New York 14625.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Howard Tewinkle
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Howard Tewinkle passed away in November 1970 at 64 years old. He was born on December 5, 1905. We have no information about Howard's family. We know that Howard Tewinkle had been residing in Rochester, Monroe County, New York 14625.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Howard's lifetime.

In 1905, in the year that Howard Tewinkle was born, the Niagara Falls conference was held in Fort Erie, Ontario. Led by W.E.B. Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter, a group of African-American men met in opposition to racial segregation and disenfranchisement. Booker T. Washington had been calling for policies of accommodation and conciliation and these two men, along with the others who attended the conference, felt that this was accomplishing nothing. The group was the precursor to the NAACP.

In 1917, by the time he was just 12 years old, on July 28, between ten and fifteen thousand blacks silently walked down New York City's Fifth Avenue to protest racial discrimination and violence. Lynchings in Waco Texas and hundreds of African-Americans killed in East St. Louis Illinois had sparked the protest. Picket signs said "Mother, do lynchers go to heaven?" "Mr. President, why not make America safe for democracy?" "Thou shalt not kill." "Pray for the Lady Macbeth's of East St. Louis" and "Give us a chance to live."

In 1922, he was 17 years old when on June 22, coal miners in Herrin Illinois, were on strike (coal miners had been on strike nationally since April 1). The striking miners were outraged at the strikebreakers (scabs) that the company had brought in and laid siege to the mine. Three union workers were killed when gunfire was exchanged. The next day, union miners killed 23 strikebreakers and mine guards. No one, on either side, ever faced jail time.

In 1939, Howard was 34 years old when on the 1st of September, Nazi Germany invaded Poland. On September 17th, the Soviet Union invaded Poland as well. Poland expected help from France and the United Kingdom, since they had a pact with both. But no help came. By October 6th, the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany held full control of the previously Polish lands. Eventually, the invasion of Poland lead to World War II.

In 1970, in the year of Howard Tewinkle's passing, on April 10th, Paul McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles. (John Lennon had previously told the band that he was leaving but hadn't publicly announced it.) By the end of the year, each Beatle had his own album.

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