Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs

(1801 - 1886)

A photo of Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs
Hugh R, Boggs
1801 - 1886
Born
October 25, 1801
Lee County, Virginia United States
Death
August 9, 1886
Cains Creek, Lawrence, KY
Other Names
Hughie
Summary
Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs was born on October 25, 1801 in Virginia. He died on August 9, 1886 at Cains Creek, Lawrence, KY at 84 years of age.
Updated: January 28, 2021
2 Followers
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
The Big Sandy Valley; History of the People and country, From the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, by William Ely....Published 1887
Page 446, 447:
"HUGH BOGGS OF BLAINE:
The nestor of the Boggses on Caines Creek, a branch of the Blaine, has been a man of remarkable energy. Hugh Boggs opened a large farm on his creek, and, by chopping wood and bossing other wood-choppers at the old-time furnaces, made money enough to build a steam saw and grain mill and a carding machine at quite an early day. Had Hugh Boggs lived at a place more get-at-able, he would have been to Caines Creek what Judge Borders was to his section, and what William Adams was to Licking Station.
The country around Mr. Boggs was too sparsely settled to expand his business, yet nevertheless he was always a good liver. Caines Creek, in Lawrence County, is a stream of wide and rich bottom land, almost all of which is owned by the Boggses, descendants of either Hugh Boggs or his kinsmen. He nears the end of his earthly race, being quite feeble in body but smart in mind. He has been a benefactor, an educator, and a philanthropist, although in his unselfishness he might himself never have suspected it."

The Boggs families left Lee County Virginia in the early 1800's and settled in Caines Creek, KY.
Poem, "Coming to Kentucky" written by Hugh Boggs about his family's arrival at Caines Creek, Kentucky.

Deep in the hills, 'neath an azure sky, There's a place so remote, the world passed it by. For thousands of years, no mortal had trod, the green dewy valley's rich, fertile sod. Till one day long ago, twas just break of dawn, The curtain of night had parted and gone, to make room for the sun, coming over the hill, when life began stirring, and song birds to trill.
High on the hill top, there stood a young man, his blue eyes were narrowed, the landscape to scan. It was hard to believe, "this" was not paradise, or a dream, surely soon, he would open his eyes.
Could he be back in Virginia, from whence he had come, his thoughts were conflicting, his body felt numb.
He had come a long way, this young man of sod, not seeking vast fortunes, just a homestead and God. He felt a soft breeze touch his tired brow and cheek, as he drank in the beauty, of Old Caines Creek. In his heart sprang new hope, in his eyes a fire lit, as he whispered so softly, "Sacred Wind", this is it! His glance wandered back, to the newly made road, and the old covered wagon, with it's oversized load. Of worldly possessions, his kindred and wife, all the blessings it takes, to complete a man's life.
With a lump in his throat, and a prayer-full sigh, he lifted his eyes, towards the blue, cloudless sky. He would cast his lot, 'neath this heavenly dome', and make this new valley, his much beloved home.
Bright eyes were now peering, from out of the side, of the old covered wagon, from whose long weary ride, had kept vigil so faithfully, through the long sleepless nights, were now anxiously waiting, to explore new delights. For they knew by the smile on the young man's face, their searching had ended, this was the "PLACE"!
He smiled as he nodded them, all to alight, and the picture they made was a heart warming sight. As they hustled and bustled, and flitted about, his bosom swelled proudly, he felt he could shout. There was Cessie and Azzel, John, Henry and Jim, Emily, Hannah, Hugh, Jason and Tim. Sarah, Ellen, Matilda, Clem, Orkie and Bud, and the cow they brought with them, still chewing her cud. There was Pa who had courage, faith, muscle and brawn, and Ma who was shy, as a newly born fawn. But her Irish eyes twinkled and sparked with such fire, as she glanced at her 'brood',and her tall, handsome 'sire'. All these and still more, of his beloved kin, took part in the new life, about to begin. There was hard work ahead, hungry children to feed. There were blankets and quilts, and plenty of seed. Sharp axes and hoes, and mallets galore, Kind hearts and strong hands, could a man ask for more?
Everyone was astir, busy as bees; clearing land, burning brush, and chopping down trees, that were hewn, niched then rolled, and set up in place, soon this spot in the wildwood, took on a new face, that was pleasing to God, who smiled a "well done", as they played, sang and danced, and relaxed in their fun.
Now the hillsides were covered, with sweet golden corn, where wild honey-suckle sends it's fragrance each morn. From it's lofty abode, in it's dewy recluse, where mocking birds sing, and morning doves coo; there! the clear crystal dew, trickles over the rocks, that jut from the hills, where sheep graze in flocks. And winds it's way down, to the creek far below, where the bob-o-links nest, and the wild flowers grow. Where paintings that hung, in the great halls of fame, could match this wild beauty, or portray the same, ethereal colors that flame in the sky.
As dawn is approaching, and night passes by, my thoughts travel back to the sweet yesteryear, when folks were good neighbors, and kin-folks were dear. To the children who sat, by the bright fire-logs, and listed to tales, of their grand-sire "Boggs".

Tales of Sacred Winds, Coming of Age in Appalachia by Cratis Williams
pages 146/147:
"Hugh and Hannah Boggs (Granny Hanner)
Hugh Boggs, son of John and Nancy Wells Boggs, was considered a generous man. He was a farmer and timber man. A page is devoted to him in William Ely's History of the BigSandy Valley. Mr. Ely implies that Hugh was imposed upon by his less industrious sons. There is a story that Hugh's son Henderson bought all the land on the right fork of Caines Creek for a ham of meat and a rifle-gun. Henderson's home, still standing and occupied at this time (1965) by his descendant Opal Boggs Liming, is one of the better homes in that section. It is said that Hugh and his aged wife spent their last days with Henderson in this house. It is also said that Hugh's mother-in-law Hannah Lyons Blevins, also lived with Henderson after she became a widow. She was over a hundred years old when she dies and was one of the last widows of the American Revolution carried on the pension rolls of Lawrence County. She was blind in her old age. There is an instance of a "judgement sent on" one of the old lady's descendants for laughing at her great-grandmother's infirmities. Phoebe Jane, daughter of Jim Goins and Matilda Lyons Boggs, laughed at her blind great-granny and 'mocked' (imitated) her pigeon-toed walk. Phoebe Jane (always called 'Pet') who married Henry Hicks became pigeon-toed and later, blind, like Granny Hanner.
An interesting story is also told of William Blevins, Granny Hanner's husband. He was the son of a 'long hunter' from Wilkes County, NC. His uncle by marriage, also a long hunter, was named Walden. Old hunter Blevins, his sons, and his son-in-law tracked into Kentucky before Daniel Boone ever visited Kentucky. The Monrovian Records of North Carolina carry an item for 1754 reporting that Blevins and his sons brought to the trading post at old Salem more pelts than there was cash to pay for, but that they happily accepted goods in leu of cash. Walden's Ridge was named for William Blevins' uncle. William, referred to locally as "Old Bill", was an unkind man to his family. He hung his meat in the rafters of his cabin, but would not permit his wife to use the hams, which he gave to a woman that he kept on his land."
Show & Tell His Story
Share your memories, family stories, & photos so that Hugh is always remembered.
Biography
Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs
Most commonly known name
Hugh R, Boggs
Full name
Hughie
Nickname(s) or aliases
Male
Gender
Hugh Boggs was born on in Lee County, Virginia United States
Birth
Hugh Boggs died on at Cains Creek, Lawrence, KY
Death
Hugh Boggs was born on in Lee County, Virginia United States
Hugh Boggs died on at Cains Creek, Lawrence, KY
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Professions

Hugh was a farmer and was responsible for all the machinery which was in the first grist mill ever to be placed in eastern Kentucky.

Personal Life

Unknown
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Looking for a different Hugh Boggs?
View other bios of people named Hugh Boggs

Hugh 's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Boggs family tree.

Hugh 's Family

Parent
Parent
Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs
Partner
Child
Partner
Child
Sibling

Friends:

Photos and snapshots taken of Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs, his Boggs family, and locations and places or events from his life.

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about Hugh .

Share Hugh 's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs died on August 9, 1886 at Cains Creek, Lawrence, KY at age 84. He was born on October 25, 1801 in Virginia. We have no information about Hugh 's family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Hugh 's lifetime.

In 1801, in the year that Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs was born, on March 4th, Thomas Jefferson was inaugurated as the third President in Washington, D.C. He was the first President to be inaugurated in Washington D.C. and the 2nd to live in the White House.

In 1831, by the time he was 30 years old, on November 7th, slave trading was forbidden in Brazil. Purchasing slaves had begun under Portuguese rule in the mid-16th century - slaves were used on sugarcane plantations. It wasn't until 1888, however, that slavery was totally abolished.

In 1866, he was 65 years old when on April 10th, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals - the ASPCA - was created. New Yorker Henry Bergh was the first President of the Society and the leader in its creation. He later formed the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

In 1879, at the age of 78 years old, Hugh was alive when on November 10th, Bell Telephone and Western Union reached an agreement. Bell Telephone would keep out of the telegraphy business and Western Union would stay out of the telephone business - leading to success for both.

In 1886, in the year of Hugh R. "Hughie" Boggs's passing, on January 5th, Scottish novelist Robert Louis Stevenson's book the Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was published. Immediately popular, the paperback book was sold for $1 in the U.S. - almost $25 today. Stevenson's stepson said that he wrote the first draft in under 3 days.

Other Hugh Boggs

Bio
c. 1920 - Unknown
Bio
c. 1919 - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
c. 1948 - Unknown
Bio
c. 1983 - Unknown
Bio
Mar 6, 1902 - July 1971
Bio
Feb 22, 1899 - April 1972
Bio
Feb 3, 1905 - January 1980
Bio
Jan 22, 1900 - June 1974
Bio
Feb 12, 1942 - Jun 23, 2005
Bio
May 3, 1926 - Jun 8, 2007
Bio
Jan 31, 1931 - June 1981
Bio
Mar 5, 1877 - December 1962
Bio
Aug 16, 1926 - Apr 6, 2001
Bio
Jan 5, 1919 - Nov 9, 1974
Bio
Mar 24, 1894 - January 1984
Bio
Oct 13, 1920 - Jul 10, 2004
Bio
Jun 23, 1926 - December 1981
Bio
Mar 30, 1868 - Unknown

Other Boggs

Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
December 1888 - Unknown
Bio
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Mar 17, 1906 - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Mar 7, 1879 - Jun 12, 1936
Bio
Jul 4, 1875 - Nov 27, 1939
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown

Other Bios

Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
Unknown - Unknown
Bio
1825 - Unknown
Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top