Jacob Hiatt (1908 - 2001)

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Jacob Hiatt
1908 - 2001
Born
July 1, 1908
Death
February 25, 2001
Last Known Residence
Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts 01607
Summary
Jacob Hiatt was born on July 1, 1908. He died on February 25, 2001 at 92 years old. We know that Jacob Hiatt had been residing in Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts 01607.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Jacob Hiatt
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Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts 01607
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Jacob Hiatt died on February 25, 2001 at 92 years old. He was born on July 1, 1908. There is no information about Jacob's immediate family. We know that Jacob Hiatt had been residing in Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts 01607.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Jacob's lifetime.

In 1908, in the year that Jacob Hiatt was born, a 7.1 earthquake and the resulting tsunami killed 70,000 to 100,000 people in southern Italy and Sicily. The earthquake, lasting 30 to 40 seconds, occurred in the Strait of Messina which was between the region of Calabria (at the "toe" of Italy) and the island of Sicily and destruction from it occurred in a 186 mile radius. It was the most destructive earthquake ever to hit Europe.

In 1918, by the time he was only 10 years old, in January, President Wilson presented his Fourteen Points, which assured citizens that World War I was being fought for a moral cause and outlined a plan for postwar peace in Europe. The only leader of the Allies to present such a plan, the Europeans thought Wilson was being too idealistic. The points included free trade, open agreements, democracy and self-determination. They were based on the research and suggestions of 150 advisors.

In 1946, he was 38 years old when on July 4th, the Philippines gained independence from the United States. In 1964, Independence Day in the Philippines was moved from July 4th to June 12th at the insistence of nationalists and historians.

In 1976, at the age of 68 years old, Jacob was alive when The United States celebrated the Bicentennial of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It was a year long celebration, with the biggest events taking place on July 4th.

In 1981, he was 73 years old when on August 1st, MTV debuted. It was the first music video TV channel. The first music video played was the Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star" - the second was Pat Benatar's "You Better Run".

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