Jane Elizabeth George (1863 - 1942)

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Jane Elizabeth George
1863 - 1942
Born
1863
Death
1942
Camberwell, Australia
Last Known Residence
Camberwell, Australia
Summary
Jane Elizabeth George was born in 1863. She was born to Trueman George George and Jane Comben George. She died in 1942 in Camberwell, Australia at 79 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Jane Elizabeth George
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Jane Elizabeth George
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Camberwell, Australia
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Jane George died in in Camberwell, Australia
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Jane George was born in
Jane George died in in Camberwell, Australia
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Jane Elizabeth George died in 1942 in Camberwell, Australia at age 79. She was born in 1863. She was born to Trueman George George and Jane Comben George.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Jane's lifetime.

In 1863, in the year that Jane Elizabeth George was born, on October 3rd, during the middle of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln created a national Thanksgiving day. Thanksgiving was to be celebrated on the final Thursday of November in 1863. In the U.S., Thanksgiving has been celebrated in November ever since.

In 1893, she was 30 years old when on November 7th, the women of Colorado were given the right to vote via a state referendum. Fifty-five percent of voters turned out and the referendum passed with 35,798 voting in favor and 29,551 voting against.

In 1903, she was 40 years old when the Harley-Davidson Motor Company was begun by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson - with help from Arthur's brother, Walter. Their first prototype - a "motor-bicycle" - couldn't climb hills without also pedaling, so they went back to the drawing board, and in 1904 their new version came in 4th in a race. Harley-Davidson and Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company were the only two major motorcycle companies to survive the Great Depression.

In 1924, Jane was 61 years old when J. Edgar Hoover, at the age of 29, was appointed the sixth director of the Bureau of Investigation by Calvin Coolidge (which later became the Federal Bureau of Investigation). The Bureau had approximately 650 employees, including 441 Special Agents. A former employee of the Justice Department, Hoover accepted his new position on the proviso that the bureau was to be completely divorced from politics and that the director report only to the attorney general.

In 1942, in the year of Jane Elizabeth George's passing, on June 17th, Roosevelt approved the Manhattan Project, which lead to the development of the first atomic bomb. With the support of Canada and the United Kingdom, the Project came to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion. Julius Robert Oppenheimer, a nuclear physicist born in New York, led the Los Alamos Laboratory that developed the actual bomb. The first artificial nuclear explosion took place near Alamogordo New Mexico on July 16, 1945.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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