John Lear (1890 - 1972)

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John Lear
1890 - 1972
Born
July 28, 1890
Death
October 1972
Last Known Residence
Ruby, Chesterfield County, South Carolina 29741
Summary
John Lear was born on July 28, 1890. He died in October 1972 at 82 years old. We know that John Lear had been residing in Ruby, Chesterfield County, South Carolina 29741.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Lear passed away in October 1972 at age 82. He was born on July 28, 1890. We have no information about John's immediate family. We know that John Lear had been residing in Ruby, Chesterfield County, South Carolina 29741.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1890, in the year that John Lear was born, on July 3rd, Idaho became the 43rd state in the United States. On July 10th, Wyoming became the 44th state.

In 1901, at the age of only 11 years old, John was alive when Edward VII succeeded Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria of England had become Queen in 1837 and reigned until her death in 1901. Her 63 year reign was the longest in history prior to Elizabeth II who recently broke her record. The time during which she led the country was known as the Victorian era and she presided over great changes in the United Kingdom, including the expansion of the British Empire and the Industrial Revolution.

In 1938, he was 48 years old when on June 25th (a Saturday) the Fair Labor Standards Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt (along with 120 other bills). The Act banned oppressive child labor, set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and established the maximum workweek at 44 hours. It faced a lot of opposition and in fighting for it, Roosevelt said "Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day, ...tell you...that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry."

In 1955, he was 65 years old when on September 30th, movie star James Dean, 24, died in a car accident. He was headed in his new Porsche 550 to a race in Salinas California when, traveling at 85 mph, he collided with a 1950 Ford Tudor, also speeding, driven by a 23 year old college student. Dean died, his passenger and the other driver survived.

In 1972, in the year of John Lear's passing, on September 5th, the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, with the assistance of German neo-nazis, kidnapped and killed 11 Israeli athletes at the Olympic Games in Munich. The attackers crept into the Olympic Village and abducted the athletes while they were sleeping. A German policeman was also killed.

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