Nancy Montague (1884 - 1973)

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Nancy Montague
1884 - 1973
Born
May 11, 1884
Death
March 1973
Last Known Residence
Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon 97202
Summary
Nancy Montague was born on May 11, 1884. She died in March 1973 at 88 years of age. We know that Nancy Montague had been residing in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon 97202.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Nancy Montague
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Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon 97202
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Nancy Montague died in March 1973 at 88 years old. She was born on May 11, 1884. We have no information about Nancy's family. We know that Nancy Montague had been residing in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon 97202.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Nancy's lifetime.

In 1884, in the year that Nancy Montague was born, on August 5th, the cornerstone for the base of the Statue of Liberty - a gift from the people of France - was laid. 120,000 people - most donations were $1 - donated to the completion of the base. An 1883 poem by Emma Lazarus was also written to raise funds. That poem was included in the base of the statue and is well known today. The most famous phrase: "Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

In 1893, when she was just 9 years old, on February 1st, Thomas Edison's motion picture studio on his laboratory grounds in West Orange New Jersey was completed. The studio was called "Black Maria" and the first movie made and viewed in it was of 3 people pretending to be blacksmiths.

In 1922, she was 38 years old when on James Joyce's 40th birthday, his book Ulysses was published in France. The book covers the experiences of an Irishman in Dublin on an ordinary day, 16 June 1904. Now considered a classic, it was controversial at the time. Due to some sexual content, the book was banned in the U.S. during the 1920's and the U.S. Post Office destroyed 500 copies of the novel.

In 1936, when she was 52 years old, on November 2nd, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) debuted the world's first regular high-definition television service. The channel had a short schedule - Monday through Saturday, 3:00p to 4:00p and 9:00p to 10:00p. The first broadcast was "Opening of the BBC Television Service".

In 1973, in the year of Nancy Montague's passing, on August 15th, amidst rising calls for the impeachment of President Richard Nixon, Congress imposed an end to the bombing of Cambodia.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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