Olai Moberg

(1882 - 1963)

A photo of Olai Moberg
Olai Moberg
1882 - 1963
Born
March 22, 1882
Death
September 1963
Last Known Residence
Washington
Summary
Olai Moberg was born on March 22, 1882. Olai died in September 1963 at 81 years of age. We know that Olai Moberg had been residing in Washington.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Olai Moberg
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Olai Moberg
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Washington
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Olai Moberg passed away in September 1963 at age 81. Olai was born on March 22, 1882. We are unaware of information about Olai's immediate family. We know that Olai Moberg had been residing in Washington.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Olai's lifetime.

In 1882, in the year that Olai Moberg was born, on March 22nd, the Edmunds Act - passed by Congress - made polygamy a felony. The Act also banned "bigamous" relationships and "unlawful cohabitation", making it illegal for polygamists and those who simply lived together without marrying to vote, be on a jury, or hold a public office.

In 1890, this person was only 8 years old when on December 29th, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred in South Dakota on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation . The U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment said that they rode into the Lakota camp "trying to disarm" the inhabitants. One person, Black Coyote - who was deaf - held onto his rifle, saying that he paid a lot of money for it. Shots rang out and by the end at least 153 Lakota Sioux - some estimates say 300 - and 25 troops had died. The site of the massacre is a National Historic Landmark.

In 1912, Olai was 30 years old when in October, former President Theodore Roosevelt was shot, but not killed, while campaigning for another term as President with the newly created Bull Moose (Progressive) Party. John Schrank was a Bavarian-born saloon-keeper from New York who had been stalking Roosevelt when he shot him just before a campaign speech. Shot in the chest (and showing the audience his bloody shirt), Roosevelt went on to give a 55 to 90 minute talk (reports vary on the length) before being treated for the injury. After 8 days in the hospital, Roosevelt went back on the campaign trail.

In 1953, when this person was 71 years old, on January 20th, Dwight D. Eisenhower became the 34th President of the United States. Formerly the 1st Supreme Allied Commander Europe in World War II, Eisenhower had never previously held a political office.

In 1963, in the year of Olai Moberg's passing, on November 22nd, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson became the 36th President of the United States when President John Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, Texas. Johnson was sworn in on the plane carrying Kennedy's body back to Washington D.C.

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Dec 10, 1907 - Apr 23, 1993 1907 - 1993
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Jan 6, 1895 - March 1982 1895 - 1982
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Feb 22, 1951 - Feb 10, 2005 1951 - 2005
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Jan 14, 1918 - Feb 16, 1995 1918 - 1995
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Jul 20, 1916 - Jun 30, 1990 1916 - 1990
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Jun 20, 1989 - Apr 2, 2008 1989 - 2008
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May 29, 1929 - Sep 18, 2009 1929 - 2009
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Dec 3, 1937 - Dec 27, 2000 1937 - 2000
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Nov 28, 1929 - February 1966 1929 - 1966
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Nov 15, 1922 - May 1975 1922 - 1975
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Jan 2, 1888 - August 1967 1888 - 1967
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Feb 16, 1918 - Feb 22, 2010 1918 - 2010
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Jul 1, 1919 - Oct 15, 1997 1919 - 1997
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Jun 17, 1925 - Jan 10, 2004 1925 - 2004
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Mar 10, 1882 - March 1967 1882 - 1967
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Jan 10, 1933 - Apr 22, 1999 1933 - 1999

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Nov 21, 1913 - May 1978 1913 - 1978
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Oct 27, 1914 - November 1979 1914 - 1979
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Dec 8, 1904 - Oct 4, 1993 1904 - 1993
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Apr 18, 1916 - March 1985 1916 - 1985
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Feb 25, 1888 - June 1967 1888 - 1967
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May 2, 1912 - Aug 12, 1997 1912 - 1997
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Apr 30, 1918 - Feb 2, 2010 1918 - 2010
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Jul 6, 1918 - Dec 8, 1996 1918 - 1996
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Oct 24, 1910 - April 1970 1910 - 1970
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Mar 24, 1906 - June 1965 1906 - 1965
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Feb 19, 1889 - December 1967 1889 - 1967
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Dec 20, 1887 - March 1969 1887 - 1969
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Aug 18, 1913 - January 1980 1913 - 1980
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Feb 16, 1900 - November 1973 1900 - 1973
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Sep 20, 1901 - December 1981 1901 - 1981
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Aug 11, 1899 - March 1975 1899 - 1975
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Oct 19, 1907 - May 2, 1993 1907 - 1993
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