Philip Moskalczyk (1907 - 1977)

A photo of Philip Moskalczyk
Add photo
Philip Moskalczyk
1907 - 1977
Born
May 24, 1907
Death
April 1977
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
Summary
Philip Moskalczyk was born on May 24, 1907. He died in April 1977 at age 69. We know that Philip Moskalczyk had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.
Updated: February 6, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Show & Tell His Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that Philip is always remembered.
Update biobiography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell Philip's life so that he is always remembered.

Biography
Philip Moskalczyk
Most commonly known as
Philip Moskalczyk
Full name
Other names or aliases
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
Last known residence
Male
Gender
Philip Moskalczyk was born on
Birth
Philip Moskalczyk died in
Death
Philip Moskalczyk was born on
Philip Moskalczyk died in
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Philip's Family Tree

Parent
Parent
Philip Moskalczyk
Partner
Child
Partner
Child
Sibling

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add Philip's family friends, and his friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

Pictures really do say a thousand words. Share photos of Philip and the Moskalczyk family.
Photo

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about Philip.

Cancel

Share Philip's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

Philip Moskalczyk passed away in April 1977 at 69 years of age. He was born on May 24, 1907. We have no information about Philip's immediate family. We know that Philip Moskalczyk had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Philip's lifetime.

In 1907, in the year that Philip Moskalczyk was born, the second Hague peace conference was called by Russia in the Netherlands. While nothing was settled regarding the matter of peace among nations, many resolutions were passed (and accepted by many nations) about the conventions of war - especially the protection of noncombatants.

In 1919, Philip was merely 12 years old when in June, the Treaty of Versailles - officially ending World War I - was signed. The European Allies demanded "compensation by Germany for all damage done to the civilian population of the Allies and their property by the aggression of Germany by land, by sea and from the air.” The requirement of compensation is seen by most as the reason for the collapse of the German economy and gave rise to the rule of Hitler.

In 1924, he was 17 years old when J. Edgar Hoover, at the age of 29, was appointed the sixth director of the Bureau of Investigation by Calvin Coolidge (which later became the Federal Bureau of Investigation). The Bureau had approximately 650 employees, including 441 Special Agents. A former employee of the Justice Department, Hoover accepted his new position on the proviso that the bureau was to be completely divorced from politics and that the director report only to the attorney general.

In 1959, at the age of 52 years old, Philip was alive when on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

In 1977, in the year of Philip Moskalczyk's passing, on January 20th, Jimmy Carter became the 39th President of the United States. Running against incumbent Gerald Ford, he won 50.1% of the popular vote to Ford's 48.0%. He was elected to only one term.

Other Moskalczyks

Other Bios

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top