Robert Malcom Gragg

(1852 - 1930)

A photo of Robert Malcom Gragg
Robert Malcom Gragg
1852 - 1930
Born
January 7, 1852
Deepwater, Henry County, Missouri United States 64740
Death
January 30, 1930
Montrose, Henry County, Missouri United States 64770
Summary
Robert Malcom Gragg, father to 1 child, was born on January 7, 1852 in Deepwater, Missouri. He was born to Henry Harlan Gragg, with sibling William. He had Leslie Gragg with an unknown partner. He died on January 30, 1930 in Montrose, Missouri at age 78.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Robert Malcolm Gragg

Born January 7, 1852 in Deepwater Township, Henry County Missouri

Son of Henry H. Gragg and Polly A. Gragg

Brother of William H. Gragg, Nancy Jane Gragg, Frances Gragg, Thomas (Marion) Gragg, Robert M. Gragg, Sarah R. (Gragg) Colson, Sarah Rebecca Gragg, Samuel Francis Gragg, John A. Gragg, Lillie Lee Gragg, George W. Gragg, Dulcena M Gragg and Elbert A Gragg

Husband of Martha Jane Harper — married December 10, 1882 in Henry County, Missour

Father of Oral O Gragg, Effie Lee Gragg, Etta M Gragg, Leslie A Gragg and Fred Harper Gragg

Died January 30, 1930 in Montrose, Henry County

Early on the morning of January 30th, 1930, the Death Angel came to our little village and claimed as its victim, Robert Malcomb Gragg. He was born January 7th, 1852, in Henry County, Missouri, in the Hopewell community spending most of his life there. He came to Montrose, in 1910. He was one of the late pioneers of this country, having his beginning in life when the great Middle West was little more than a great open space. He witnessed many changes in the country, that few are still living to tell about. Just after the sun had arisen to illuminate the earth on the morning of January 30th, God sent His Angel to brother Gragg to relieve him of his intense suffering, and illuminate his soul for an Eternity where the dark shadows never come again. He lived to be seventy-eight years and twenty-three days old. He was married to Martha J. Harper, December 10, 1882. To this union six children were born, four boys and two girls, one son died in infancy. Those left behind are his wife, Mrs. Martha J. Gragg, Montrose, Missouri; his two daughters, Mrs. Effie Lee Fenimore, Rockville, Mo.; and Mrs. Etta M. Bramell, Montrose; his sons Leslie A. Gragg, of Urich; Fred H. Gragg, of Center, Colo.; and Oral O. Gragg, of Montrose, at whose home Mr. Gragg was staying at the time of his death. He had ten grand children living and two dead. He also left four brothers and three sisters. Mr. Gragg moved to Montrose in January 1910, engaging in the harness business from 1918 until 1919, when he sold out his business to his son Oral. After 1919 he retired from active business and spent his years quietly and peacefully in his home at Montrose. His health began to fail two years ago, since that time he was a sufferer more or less, until God called him from his affliction. How true it is, that man that is born of a woman is of few days and full of trouble, and men today are still asking the age old question, if a man die shall he live again? But Brother Gragg believed in the Immortality of the soul, and he rested his Eternal destiny on the life giving Words of the Savior, when He said, He that believeth in me shall never die, and though he were dead he shall live again. Brother Gragg's honesty and integrity was unquestioned by all who knew him. He was one of the few that we meet in this world that all speak well of. No doubt he pondered many things in his heart, but none can remember of hearing him say a single word of harm of anyone. His funeral services were conducted at the Hopewell Cumberland Presbyterian church, by the pastor, L. C. Bromley. His body was laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery at await the morning of eternity. In the passing of brother Gragg, the town and community has lost one of its best citizens, yet we trust that with his passing, and his long, useful and congenial life God will be able through his example of honesty and integrity to build higher the ambitions of all those who knew Mr. Gragg and his life of sincerity. The sympathy of the entire town and community goes out to his bereaved wife and children.
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Biography
Robert Malcom Gragg
Most commonly known name
Robert Malcom Gragg
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Male
Gender
Robert Gragg was born on in Deepwater, Henry County, Missouri United States 64740
Birth
Robert Gragg died on in Montrose, Henry County, Missouri United States 64770
Death
Robert Gragg was born on in Deepwater, Henry County, Missouri United States 64740
Robert Gragg died on in Montrose, Henry County, Missouri United States 64770
Birth
Death
Hopewell Cemetery in Montrose, Henry County, Missouri United States 64770
Burial / Funeral
Heritage

Ethnicity & Lineage

White

Nationality & Locations

Scots Irish
Childhood
Adulthood
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Robert Malcom Gragg

Parents:

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Nov 28, 1820 - May 12, 1893

Siblings:

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November 1845 - Aug 1, 1938

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Robert Malcom Gragg &

Robert Malcom Gragg
Unknown

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Sep 15, 1886 - Feb 19, 1981

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Early on the morning of January 30th, 1930, the Death Angel came to our little village and claimed as its victim, Robert Malcomb Gragg. He was born January 7th, 1852, in Henry County, Missouri, in the Hopewell community spending most of his life there. He came to Montrose, in 1910. He was one of the late pioneers of this country, having his beginning in life when the great Middle West was little more than a great open space. He witnessed many changes in the country, that few are still living to tell about. Just after the sun had arisen to illuminate the earth on the morning of January 30th, God sent His Angel to brother Gragg to relieve him of his intense suffering, and illuminate his soul for an Eternity where the dark shadows never come again. He lived to be seventy-eight years and twenty-three days old. He was married to Martha J. Harper, December 10, 1882. To this union six children were born, four boys and two girls, one son died in infancy. Those left behind are his wife, Mrs. Martha J. Gragg, Montrose, Missouri; his two daughters, Mrs. Effie Lee Fenimore, Rockville, Mo.; and Mrs. Etta M. Bramell, Montrose; his sons Leslie A. Gragg, of Urich; Fred H. Gragg, of Center, Colo.; and Oral O. Gragg, of Montrose, at whose home Mr. Gragg was staying at the time of his death. He had ten grand children living and two dead. He also left four brothers and three sisters. Mr. Gragg moved to Montrose in January 1910, engaging in the harness business from 1918 until 1919, when he sold out his business to his son Oral. After 1919 he retired from active business and spent his years quietly and peacefully in his home at Montrose. His health began to fail two years ago, since that time he was a sufferer more or less, until God called him from his affliction. How true it is, that man that is born of a woman is of few days and full of trouble, and men today are still asking the age old question, if a man die shall he live again? But Brother Gragg believed in the Immortality of the soul, and he rested his Eternal destiny on the life giving Words of the Savior, when He said, He that believeth in me shall never die, and though he were dead he shall live again. Brother Gragg's honesty and integrity was unquestioned by all who knew him. He was one of the few that we meet in this world that all speak well of. No doubt he pondered many things in his heart, but none can remember of hearing him say a single word of harm of anyone. His funeral services were conducted at the Hopewell Cumberland Presbyterian church, by the pastor, L. C. Bromley. His body was laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery at await the morning of eternity. In the passing of brother Gragg, the town and community has lost one of its best citizens, yet we trust that with his passing, and his long, useful and congenial life God will be able through his example of honesty and integrity to build higher the ambitions of all those who knew Mr. Gragg and his life of sincerity. The sympathy of the entire town and community goes out to his bereaved wife and children.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Robert's lifetime.

In 1852, in the year that Robert Malcom Gragg was born, in Springfield Massachusetts, Smith & Wesson was founded. Their first gun was the Volcanic rifle. The company later expanded their line to include revolvers and ammunition.

In 1863, at the age of just 11 years old, Robert was alive when on January 1st, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. The Proclamation made the abolition of slavery in the Confederate states an official war goal. It also immediately freed 50,000 slaves, with the rest freed as Union armies advanced into Confederate states. The Proclamation wasn't a Congressional law - it was an Executive Order.

In 1893, at the age of 41 years old, Robert was alive when on November 7th, the women of Colorado were given the right to vote via a state referendum. Fifty-five percent of voters turned out and the referendum passed with 35,798 voting in favor and 29,551 voting against.

In 1910, Robert was 58 years old when the Mann Act, also called the White-Slave Traffic Act, was signed into law. Its purpose was to make it a felony to engage in interstate or foreign commerce transport of "any woman or girl for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose". But the language was so broad that it was also applied to consensual sex between adults when wished.

In 1930, in the year of Robert Malcom Gragg's passing, as head of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, William Hays established a code of decency that outlined what was acceptable in films. The public - and government - had felt that films in the '20's had become increasingly risque and that the behavior of its stars was becoming scandalous. Laws were being passed. In response, the heads of the movie studios adopted a voluntary "code", hoping to head off legislation. The first part of the code prohibited "lowering the moral standards of those who see it", called for depictions of the "correct standards of life", and forbade a picture from showing any sort of ridicule towards a law or "creating sympathy for its violation". The second part dealt with particular behavior in film such as homosexuality, the use of specific curse words, and miscegenation.

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