Ruth v Drew (1915 - 2001)

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Ruth V Drew
1915 - 2001
Born
November 28, 1915
Death
June 1, 2001
Last Known Residence
Enfield, White County, Illinois 62835
Summary
Ruth v Drew was born on November 28, 1915. She died on June 1, 2001 at 85 years old. We know that Ruth v Drew had been residing in Enfield, White County, Illinois 62835.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Ruth v Drew
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Enfield, White County, Illinois 62835
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Ruth v Drew died on June 1, 2001 at 85 years old. She was born on November 28, 1915. We are unaware of information about Ruth's family or relationships. We know that Ruth v Drew had been residing in Enfield, White County, Illinois 62835.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ruth's lifetime.

In 1915, in the year that Ruth v Drew was born, the Germans first used poison gas as a weapon at the second Battle of Ypres during World War I. While noxious gases had been used since ancient times, this was the first use of poisonous gas - in this case, lethal chlorine gas - in modern war. Subsequently, the French and British - as well as the United States when they entered World War 1 - developed and used lethal gas in war.

In 1933, she was 18 years old when on December 5th, the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified. The 21st Amendment said "The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed." Alcohol was legal again! It was the only amendment to the Constitution approved for the explicit purpose of repealing a previously existing amendment. South Carolina was the only state to reject the Amendment.

In 1941, at the age of 26 years old, Ruth was alive when on December 7th, the Japanese attacked the military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The surprise aerial attack damaged 8 U.S. battleships (6 later returned to service), including the USS Arizona, and destroyed 188 aircraft. 2,402 American citizens died and 1,178 wounded were wounded. On December 8th, the U.S. declared war on Japan and on December 11th, Germany and Italy (allies of Japan) declared war on the United States. World War II was in full swing.

In 1969, Ruth was 54 years old when one hundred countries, along with the United States and the Soviet Union signed the nuclear nonproliferation treaty (NPT). It called for stopping the spread of nuclear weapons, the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and the goal of nuclear disarmament.

In 1977, when she was 62 years old, on January 20th, Jimmy Carter became the 39th President of the United States. Running against incumbent Gerald Ford, he won 50.1% of the popular vote to Ford's 48.0%. He was elected to only one term.

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