Samuel Molyneux

(1886 - 1917)

A photo of Samuel  Molyneux
Samuel Molyneux
1886 - 1917
Born
1886
Penketh, Warrington, Lancashire, England in Liverpool, Lancashire County
Death
1917
Flanders
Last Known Residence
Litherland 126 Bridge Road - Litherland, in Liverpool, Lancashire County, England
Summary
Samuel Molyneux was born in 1886 at Penketh, Warrington, Lancashire, England, Liverpool. He had sibling Enoch. He died in 1917 in Flanders at 31 years old.
Updated: April 19, 2021
4 Followers
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Samuel not only left behind his wife he had a large family of brothers and sisters, his eldest Brother my was Great Grandfather George Molyneux was 20 years older than him. Sam had a twin brother who also served in the first world war and was lucky to survive, though how he must have felt losing the brother closest to him is unimaginable. He married and had children something Sam sadly did not.
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Biography
Samuel Molyneux
Most commonly known name
Samuel Molyneux
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Litherland 126 Bridge Road - Litherland, in Liverpool, Lancashire County, England
Last known residence
Male
Gender
Samuel Molyneux was born in at Penketh, Warrington, Lancashire, England in Liverpool, Lancashire County
Birth
Samuel Molyneux died in in Flanders
Death
Samuel Molyneux was born in at Penketh, Warrington, Lancashire, England in Liverpool, Lancashire County
Samuel Molyneux died in in Flanders
Birth
Death
Killed in Action
Cause of death
Ypres (menin Gate) Memorial Panel 41 And 43. in England
Burial / Funeral
Heritage

Ethnicity & Lineage

British

Nationality & Locations

British
Childhood

Education

St Philip's School
Litherland

Religion

CofE/ Weslyan Methedist
Adulthood

Professions

Tanner

Personal Life

Member of works bowling club

Military Service

Service number: 15555
Rank: Company Sargent Major
Regiment: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
Unit/ship/squadron: 9th Bn.
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

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Chris Fisher
3 favorites
KILLED IN ACTION.
OFFICERS TRIBUTE TO OLD ST PHILIP’S BOY


It has been officially announced that Coy.-Sergt. Major Sam Molyneux, of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment was killed in action on June 7th. He was 31 years of age. He was born at Penketh, near Warrington, but at an early age his family came to live in Litherland, and he was educated at St Philip’s Schools. His residence was at 126, Bridge Road.
Before joining the colours Coy.-Sgt.-Major Molyneux worked for the Liverpool Tanning Company, Field-lane. He had been employed there for ten years, and was held in great respect by both employers and fellow workers. He was for many years also, a member of the Bowling Club, where he was always held in the highest esteem by his club-mates and all connected with the Northern Bowling League. For a number of years Molyneux belonged to the 4th V.B. KLR. On the outbreak of war he at once responded to the call, and on September 12th, 1914, joined the North Lancashires. In October, 1915, he went out to France. He was twice mentioned in despatches for gallantry, and in the action when he met his death was acting as regimental sergeant-major. He has left a widow, for whom deep sympathy is expressed.
The captain commanding deceased’s Company writes of him: “I could never wish to have a better and more loyal helper than he was - brave to a fault when there was danger, and always willing to do hours of work. In the attack he was acting as Battalion Sergeant-Major, and he was killed instantly by a shell. He could never have known that he was hit, so he was spared any pain or suffering. I shall miss him dreadfully, but the splendid work he did will live in this Company for a long time." - The C.Q.M.S. writes:-“He died a true soldier's death. He never for one moment shirked the issue. I am told he bravely led his men on, and I feel sure had he survived his gallantry would have been rewarded. He was a brave man, and I am proud he was my mate.” - The Wesleyan Chaplain also writes of C.S.M. Molyneux in appreciative terms, and like the correspondents previously mentioned expressed his deepest sympathy with Mrs Molyneux
Jul 08, 2014 · Reply
Elaine Gates
2 favorites
Samuel was my great great uncle, his sister was my great grandmother, Emily Molyneux who went on to marry William Knight. The information quoted is incorrect he did marry see the information recorded on this website [external link]. William Knight's son, my great uncle, is still very much alive and he states that Sam's widow married one of the brothers and emigrated to Canada. I'd like to know more
Nov 11, 2014 · Reply
Peter Milling
19 favorites
I came upon his grave with his name on which is shared with his late mother and father.
The Grave is in st marys Cemetery, st marys road Penketh Warrington.
Apr 19 · Reply

Share Samuel's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

A Well-Known Litherland bowler killed

News has been received that Company Serg.-Major Sam Molyneux (31), of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, has been killed in action. This gallant soldier lived at Bridge-road, Litherland. He was employed before the war with the Sefton Tanning Co., and was a well-known local bowler. For a number of years he was a member of the Volunteers, and rejoined the colours when the war broke out. At the time of his death he was acting regimental sergt.-major


Crosby Herald 21st July 1917

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Samuel's lifetime.

In 1886, in the year that Samuel Molyneux was born, on June 13th, the "Great Vancouver Fire" destroyed most of Vancouver, British Columbia. A small brush fire got out of control and spread to the rest of the city. Dozens of people died and it was only after the fire that money was raised for a fire hall. The local Squamish tribe rescued people who had jumped into bodies of water to escape the conflagration.

In 1894, he was just 8 years old when large reserves of oil were discovered on the Osage Indian reservation in Oklahoma. Previously thought to be "useless" land - not even good for farming - the tribe had bought the land themselves. The discovery of oil made the Osage the "richest group of people in the world" at the time.

In 1897, when he was merely 11 years old, on July 17th, the Klondike Gold Rush began when the first successful prospectors returned to Seattle after mining in the Yukon. They arrived on the ships Excelsior and Portland, bringing vast quantities of gold - over $32,000,000 in today's money - and everyone rushed to become rich in the Yukon.

In 1908, Samuel was 22 years old when unemployment in the U.S. was at 8.0% and the cost of a first-class stamp was 2 cents while the population in the United States was 88,710,000. The world population was almost 4.4 billion.

In 1917, in the year of Samuel Molyneux's passing, on July 28, between ten and fifteen thousand blacks silently walked down New York City's Fifth Avenue to protest racial discrimination and violence. Lynchings in Waco Texas and hundreds of African-Americans killed in East St. Louis Illinois had sparked the protest. Picket signs said "Mother, do lynchers go to heaven?" "Mr. President, why not make America safe for democracy?" "Thou shalt not kill." "Pray for the Lady Macbeth's of East St. Louis" and "Give us a chance to live."

Other Molyneuxes

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c. 1891 - Sep 13, 1918 1891 - 1918
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Unknown - May 31, 1916 ? - 1916
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c. 1873 - Apr 23, 1917 1873 - 1917
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Unknown - May 21, 1916 ? - 1916
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Unknown - Oct 9, 1917 ? - 1917
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c. 1883 - Oct 21, 1916 1883 - 1916
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c. 1912 - May 29, 1940 1912 - 1940
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c. 1919 - Aug 17, 1942 1919 - 1942
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c. 1893 - Mar 28, 1920 1893 - 1920
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Unknown - Dec 23, 1917 ? - 1917
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c. 1889 - May 8, 1915 1889 - 1915
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Unknown - Aug 20, 1916 ? - 1916
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c. 1877 - Sep 8, 1916 1877 - 1916
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Unknown - Aug 15, 1918 ? - 1918
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c. 1880 - Jul 26, 1918 1880 - 1918
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c. 1911 - Oct 1, 1946 1911 - 1946
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Unknown - May 25, 1916 ? - 1916
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c. 1921 - May 7, 1944 1921 - 1944
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c. 1923 - Oct 18, 1947 1923 - 1947
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Unknown - Jul 11, 1944 ? - 1944

Other Bios

Bio
c. 1891 - Sep 13, 1918 1891 - 1918
Bio
Unknown - May 31, 1916 ? - 1916
Bio
c. 1873 - Apr 23, 1917 1873 - 1917
Bio
Unknown - May 21, 1916 ? - 1916
Bio
Unknown - Oct 9, 1917 ? - 1917
Bio
c. 1883 - Oct 21, 1916 1883 - 1916
Bio
c. 1912 - May 29, 1940 1912 - 1940
Bio
c. 1919 - Aug 17, 1942 1919 - 1942
Bio
c. 1893 - Mar 28, 1920 1893 - 1920
Bio
Unknown - Dec 23, 1917 ? - 1917
Bio
c. 1889 - May 8, 1915 1889 - 1915
Bio
Unknown - Aug 20, 1916 ? - 1916
Bio
c. 1877 - Sep 8, 1916 1877 - 1916
Bio
Unknown - Aug 15, 1918 ? - 1918
Bio
c. 1880 - Jul 26, 1918 1880 - 1918
Bio
c. 1911 - Oct 1, 1946 1911 - 1946
Bio
Unknown - May 25, 1916 ? - 1916
Bio
c. 1921 - May 7, 1944 1921 - 1944
Bio
c. 1923 - Oct 18, 1947 1923 - 1947
Bio
Unknown - Jul 11, 1944 ? - 1944
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