William Eugene Gilyeat (1942 - 2010)

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William Eugene Gilyeat
1942 - 2010
Born
April 12, 1942
Death
June 6, 2010
Last Known Residence
Kennewick, Benton County, Washington 99336
Summary
William Eugene Gilyeat was born on April 12, 1942. He died on June 6, 2010 at 68 years old. We know that William Eugene Gilyeat had been residing in Kennewick, Benton County, Washington 99336.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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William Eugene Gilyeat
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Kennewick, Benton County, Washington 99336
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William Eugene Gilyeat passed away on June 6, 2010 at 68 years of age. He was born on April 12, 1942. We are unaware of information about William's family or relationships. We know that William Eugene Gilyeat had been residing in Kennewick, Benton County, Washington 99336.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during William's lifetime.

In 1942, in the year that William Eugene Gilyeat was born, on February 19th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This authorized the Secretary of War to "prescribe certain areas as military zones." On March 21st, he signed Public Law 503 which was approved after an hour discussion in the Senate and 30 minutes in the House. The Law provided for enforcement of his Executive Order. This cleared the way for approximately 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry to be evicted from the West Coast and to be held in concentration camps and other confinement sites across the country. In Hawaii, a few thousand were detained. German and Italian Americans in the U.S. were also confined.

In 1958, William was 16 years old when on January 31st, Explorer I, the United States' answer to Sputnik I (and 2,) was launched. America had entered the Space Race. The first spacecraft to detect the Van Allen radiation belt, it remained in orbit until 1970.

In 1967, he was 25 years old when between June 5th and 10th, Israeli and Egypt, Jordan, and Syria fought what came to be called the "Six-Day War". The hostilities began when Israel launched "preemptive" strikes against Egypt, destroying nearly its entire air force. It ended with Israel occupying the Sinai Peninsula, Golan Heights, Gaza Strip and West Bank.

In 1970, William was 28 years old when on April 10th, Paul McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles. (John Lennon had previously told the band that he was leaving but hadn't publicly announced it.) By the end of the year, each Beatle had his own album.

In 1990, when he was 48 years old, after 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela, the leader of the movement to end South African apartheid was released on February 11th 1990.

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