Barry family photos

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A photo of (left to right), Robert, Elizabeth, Freddy, Donald, and Maryanne Trump - children of Fred and Mary Anne (MacLeod) Trump.
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Jun 14, 1946 - Unknown
Added Aug 2, 2017 by: Kathy Pinna
Kathy Pinna
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A photo of (left to right), Maryanne (sister of Donald), Mary Anne (mother of Donald), Robert (brother of Donald), and Blaine (wife of Robert) Trump in 1985 at a Horatio Alger Award dinner.
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Aug 2, 2017 by: Kathy Pinna
Kathy Pinna
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Name written on back Mary Barry. Found at yard sale in Marion Ohio
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Oct 25, 2015 by: Jon Eager
Jon Eager
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A photo of Mary Barry. Found at a yard sale in Marion Ohio. Name written on back.
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Oct 25, 2015 by: Jon Eager
Jon Eager
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A photo of Charlotte Lynch Carey with Mick Barry (her second husband) date unknown. Mick Barry was the grandson of Sir Redmond Barry, I've been told.
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Added Oct 5, 2014 by: Kate Carey Peters
Kate Carey Peters
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Veteran Employees of Sears Store Hear Report on Profit-Sharing Pictured above are employees of Sears. Roebuck and Co.. Wilkes-Barre. who have been employed 10 years or more, shown with Samuel Apfelbaura, store manager. The occasion was the annual dis¬ tribution of profit-sharing statements, which show the extent to which each member is sharing in the company's 1950 profits. Front row: Merlyn Thacher, Frank Dreistadt, Francis Gavin, Mary Navikas. Harriet Fisher. Irene Jones. Middle row: Stanley Bittenbender. Horace Shiffer, Howard Spray. Frank Uzdella, John Hrehach, Johanna Nichols, Loretta Barry, Samuel Apfelbaum, general manager. Top row: Lawrence Carr, James Edward,s, Joseph Zoransky, James O'Hara, Joseph Stone, Frederick Rickert, assistant manager, and Cyril McHalc
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Jan 30, 1904 - Oct 23, 1988
Added Jun 21, 2014 by: Ingrid Z
Ingrid Z
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Veteran Employees of Sears Store Hear Report on Profit-Sharing Pictured above are employees of Sears. Roebuck and Co.. Wilkes-Barre. who have been employed 10 years or more, shown with Samuel Apfelbaura, store manager. The occasion was the annual dis¬ tribution of profit-sharing statements, which show the extent to which each member is sharing in the company's 1950 profits. Front row: Merlyn Thacher, Frank Dreistadt, Francis Gavin, Mary Navikas. Harriet Fisher. Irene Jones. Middle row: Stanley Bittenbender. Horace Shiffer, Howard Spray. Frank Uzdella, John Hrehach, Johanna Nichols, Loretta Barry, Samuel Apfelbaum, general manager. Top row: Lawrence Carr, James Edwards, Joseph Zoransky, James O'Hara, Joseph Stone, Frederick Rickert, assistant manager, and Cyril McHalc
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Jan 30, 1904 - Oct 23, 1988
Added Apr 28, 2014 by: Karl Achziger
Karl Achziger
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Arrived NYC 1910 Ellis Island
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Dec 4, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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NYPD 13th Pct.
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Dec 4, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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'Guerilla Days in Ireland' is the extraordinary story of the Irish War of Independence and the fight between two unequal forces, which ended in the withdrawal of the British from twenty-six counties. Seven weeks before the Truce of July 1921, the British presence in County Cork consisted of 8,800 front line infantry troops, 1,150 Black & Tan soldiers, 540 Auxiliaries, 2,080 machine gun corps, artillery and other units - a total of over 12,500 men. Against these British forces stood the Irish Republican Army whose flying columns never exceeded 310 riflemen in the whole of the county. These flying columns were small groups of dedicated Volunteers, severely commanded and disciplined. Constantly on the move, their paramount objective was merely to exist, to strike when conditions were favourable and to avoid disaster at all costs. 'In Guerilla Days in Ireland' Tom Barry describes the setting up of the West Cork flying column, its training and its plan of campaign.
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Jan 17, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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A photo of Rick Barry: Hall of Fame forward Rick Barry is the only player ever to lead the NCAA, NBA, and ABA in scoring. His name appears near the top of every all-time offensive list. He scored more than 25,000 points in his professional career and in four different seasons averaged more than 30 points. He was named to 12 All-Star teams, four All-NBA First Teams, and five All-ABA First Teams. Barry was a nearly unstoppable offensive juggernaut, a passionate competitor with an untempered desire to win. Height: 6-7; Weight: 220 lbs. Honors: Elected to Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (1987); NBA champion (1975); NBA Finals MVP (1975); All-NBA First Team (1966, '67, '74, '75, '76); All-NBA Second Team (1973); Rookie of the Year (1966); Eight-time NBA All-Star; All-Star MVP (1967); One of 50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996). ABA Honors: ABA champion (1969); All-ABA First Team (1969, '70, '71, '72); Four-time ABA All-Star. Full Name: Richard Francis Dennis Barry III Born: 3/28/44 in Elizabeth, N.J. High School: Roselle Park (N.J.) College: Miami (Fla.) Drafted: San Francisco Warriors, 1965 (No. 2 overall) Transactions: Signed with Oakland Oaks of ABA, 1967; Oaks become Washington Capitols, 1969; Traded to New York Nets, 1970; Returned to NBA's Warriors, '72; Signed with Houston Rockets, 6/17/78
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Mar 28, 1944 - Unknown
Added Jan 17, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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Barry was born in Killorglin, County Kerry. He was the son of a Royal Irish Constabulary policeman. Four years later, Thomas Barry Senior resigned and opened a business in his hometown of Rosscarbery, County Cork.[1] Barry was educated for a period at Mungret College, County Limerick from 25 August 1911 to 12 September 1912. The reason for his short stay is indicated by a reference from the school register of the Apostolic School, Mungret College; 'Went - Home (ran away) without knowledge of superiors - no vocation'.[2] In 1915, during World War I, he enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery at Cork and became a soldier in the British Army. “ In June, in my seventeenth year, I had decided to see what this Great War was like. I cannot plead I went on the advice of John Redmond or any other politician, that if we fought for the British we would secure Home Rule for Ireland, nor can I say I understood what Home Rule meant. I was not influenced by the lurid appeal to fight to save Belgium or small nations. I knew nothing about nations, large or small. I went to the war for no other reason than that I wanted to see what war was like, to get a gun, to see new countries and to feel a grown man. Above all I went because I knew no Irish history and had no national consciousness.[3] ” He fought in Mesopotamia (then part of the Ottoman Empire, present day Iraq). He rose to the rank of sergeant.[4] Barry was offered a commission in the Royal Munster Fusiliers but refused it.[citation needed] While outside Kut-el-Amara Barry first heard of the Easter Rising. On his return to Cork he was involved with ex-servicemen's organisations. In 1920, Barry joined the 3rd (West) Cork Brigade of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) which was then engaged in the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921). He was involved in brigade council meetings, was brigade-training officer, flying column commander, was consulted by IRA General Headquarters Staff (GHQ), and also participated in the formation of the IRA First Southern Division. The West Cork Brigade became famous for its discipline, efficiency and bravery, and Barry garnered a reputation as the most brilliant field commander of the war. On 28 November 1920, Barry's unit ambushed and killed almost a whole platoon of British Auxiliaries at Kilmichael, County Cork. In March 1921 at Crossbarry in the same county, Barry and 104 men, divided into seven sections, broke out of an encirclement of 1,200 strong British force from the Essex Regiment. In total, the British Army stationed over 12,500 troops in County Cork during the conflict, while Barry's men numbered no more than 310. Eventually, Barry's tactics made West Cork ungovernable for the British authorities. "They said I was ruthless, daring, savage, blood thirsty, even heartless. The clergy called me and my comrades murderers; but the British were met with their own weapons. They had gone in the mire to destroy us and our nation and down after them we had to go."[5]
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Jul 1, 1897 - Jul 2, 1980
Added Jan 17, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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Sir Charles Barry, (born May 23, 1795, London, Eng.—died May 12, 1860, London), one of the architects of the Gothic Revival in England and chief architect of the British Houses of Parliament. The son of a stationer, Barry was articled to a firm of surveyors and architects until 1817, when he set out on a three-year tour of France, Greece, Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Palestine to study architecture. In 1820 he settled in London. One of his first works was the Church of Saint Peter at Brighton, which he began in the 1820s. In 1832 he completed the Travellers’ Club in Pall Mall, the first work in the style of an Italian Renaissance palace to be built in London. In the same style and on a grander scale he built (1837–41) the Reform Club. He was also engaged on numerous private mansions in London, the finest being Bridgewater House, which was completed in the 1850s. In Birmingham one of his best works, King Edward’s School, was built in the Perpendicular Gothic style between 1833 and 1837. For Manchester he designed the Royal Institution of Fine Arts (1824–35) and the Athenaeum (1836–39), and for Halifax the town hall (completed in the early 1860s). In 1835 a design competition was held for a new Houses of Parliament building, also called Westminster Palace, to replace the one destroyed by fire in 1834. Barry won the contest in 1836, and the project occupied him for the rest of his life. With the help of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, Barry designed a composition ornamented in the Gothic Revival style and featuring two asymmetrically placed towers. The complex of the Houses of Parliament (1837–60) is Barry’s masterpiece. Barry was elected an associate of the Royal Academy of Arts in 1840 and a royal academician in the following year and received many foreign honours. He was knighted in 1852 and, on his death, was buried in Westminster Abbey. His son, Edward Middleton Barry (1830–80), also a noted architect, completed the work on the Houses of Parliament. These are some of the architectual accomplishments of Charles Barry: The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament Clock Tower, Palace of Westminster also known as "Big Ben" 10 Kensington Palace Gardens Andaz Liverpool Street Hotel Bridgewater House, Westminster Church of All Saints Dunrobin Castle Halifax Town Hall Lancaster House Nelson's Column Pepper Pot, Brighton Reform Club Royal Manchester Institution St Andrew's Church, Waterloo Street, Hove St Saviour's Church, Ringley Travellers Club Upper Brook Street Chapel, Manchester Victoria Tower
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May 23, 1795 - May 12, 1860
Robert de Barry (fl. 1175) was a Cambro-Norman warrior from Manorbier in Pembrokeshire who participated in the colonisation of the Kingdom of Desmond following the Norman invasion of Ireland. Ancestry Nesta Robert's role in the invasion and colonisation of Ireland, and his position in the medieval Welsh-Irish Norman society, was largely due to his membership of the extended family of descendants of Princess Nest ferch Rhys of Deheubarth.[1] Nest had three sons and a daughter with her husband Gerald de Windsor: the daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry. Nest also had a son - Robert Fitz-Stephen - by her second husband. William de Barry William Fitz Odo de Barry was the son of Odo or Otho, a Norman knight who assisted in the Norman Conquest of England and Wales during the 11th century. William rebuilt Manorbier Castle in stone and the family retained the lordship of Manorbier until the 15th century. Barry's brothers were Philip de Barry, Edmond de Barry and Gerald of Wales. He accompanied his half-uncle Robert to Ireland in 1169 and took part in the Siege of Wexford,[2] where he was wounded. He is mentioned as still engaged in warfare about 1175 by his brother Gerald, the historian, who highly extols his prowess. According to the "Archdall's Lodge" (1789) source, Robert, "after his services in Ireland is said to seat himself at Sevington, in Kent," and "about the year 1185 being killed at Lismore,". But as he was elder than his brother Gerald, who was born in 1146 or 1147, this Robert was about forty years old in 1185. The same source reports that the Robert who was slain near Lismore in that year was only an adolescens that is, between fifteen and twenty eight years of age. It is improbable therefore that Robert (aged 40) was slain at Lismore. That person is more likely to be his namesake, the son of his brother Philip
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Added Jan 15, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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The Norman invasion of Ireland was a two-stage process, which began on 1 May 1169 when a force of loosely associated Norman knights landed near Bannow, County Wexford at the request of Dermot MacMurrough (Diarmait Mac Murchada), the ousted King of Leinster, who sought their help in regaining his kingdom. On 18 October 1171, Henry II landed a much bigger army in Waterford to ensure his continuing control over the preceding Norman force. In the process he took Dublin and had accepted the fealty of the Irish kings and bishops by 1172, so creating the Lordship of Ireland, which formed part of his Angevin Empire. Treaty of Windsor Pope Adrian IV, the only English pope, in one of his earliest acts issued a papal bull in 1155, giving Henry authority to invade Ireland as a means of ensuring reform by bringing the Irish Church more directly under the control of the Holy See.[1] Little contemporary use, however, was made of the bull Laudabiliter since its text enforced papal suzerainty not only over the island of Ireland but of all islands off of the European coast, including England, in virtue of the Constantinian Donation. The relevant text reads: There is indeed no doubt, as thy Highness doth also acknowledge, that Ireland and all other islands which Christ the Son of Righteousness has illumined, and which have received the doctrines of the Christian faith, belong to the jurisdiction of St. Peter and of the holy Roman Church. References to Laudabiliter become more frequent in the later Tudor period when the researches of the Renaissance humanist scholars cast doubt on the historicity of the Donation. But even if the Donation was spurious, other documents such as Dictatus papae (1075–87) reveal that by the 12th century the Papacy felt it had political powers superior to all kings and local rulers. Pope Alexander III, who was Pope at the time of the invasion, mentioned and reconfirmed the effect of Laudabiliter in his "Privilege" of 1172. Invasion of 1169 Original landing site for the invasion – Bannow Bay After losing the protection of Tyrone Chief, Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland, who died in 1166, MacMorrough was forcibly exiled by a confederation of Irish forces under the new High King, Rory O'Connor. MacMurrough fled first to Bristol and then to Normandy. He sought and obtained permission from Henry II of England to use the latter's subjects to regain his kingdom. Having received an oath of fealty from Dermod, Henry gave him letters patent in the following words: Henry, King of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, to all his liegemen, English, Norman, Welsh and Scotch, and to all the nations under his dominion, greeting. When these letters shall come into your hands, know ye, that we have received Dermod, Prince of Leinster, into the bosom of our grace and benevolence. Wherefore, whosoever, in the ample extent of all our territories, shall be willing to assist in restoring that prince, as our vassal and liegeman, let such person know, that we do hereby grant to him our licence and favour for the said undertaking.[2] By 1167 MacMurrough had obtained the services of Maurice Fitz Gerald and later persuaded Rhys ap Gruffydd Prince of Deheubarth to release Fitz Gerald's half-brother Robert Fitz-Stephen from captivity to take part in the expedition. Most importantly he obtained the support of the Earl of Pembroke Richard de Clare, known as Strongbow. The first Norman knight to land in Ireland was Richard fitz Godbert de Roche in 1167, but it was not until 1169 that the main body of Norman, Welsh and Flemish forces landed in Wexford. Within a short time Leinster was conquered, Waterford and Dublin were under Diarmait's control. Strongbow married Diarmait's daughter, Aoife, and was named as heir to the Kingdom of Leinster. This latter development caused consternation to Henry II, who feared the establishment of a rival Norman state in Ireland. Accordingly, he resolved to visit Leinster to establish his authority. Arrival of Henry II in 1171 Henry landed with a large fleet at Waterford in 1171, becoming the first King of England to set foot on Irish soil. Both Waterford and Dublin were proclaimed Royal Cities. In November Henry accepted the submission of the Irish kings in Dublin. In 1172 Henry arranged for the Irish bishops to attend the Synod of Cashel and to run the Irish Church in the same manner as the Church in England. Adrian's successor, Pope Alexander III, then ratified the grant of Ireland to Henry, ".. following in the footsteps of the late venerable Pope Adrian, and in expectation also of seeing the fruits of our own earnest wishes on this head, ratify and confirm the permission of the said Pope granted you in reference to the dominion of the kingdom of Ireland." Henry was happily acknowledged by most of the Irish Kings, who saw in him a chance to curb the expansion of both Leinster and the Normans. He then had to leave for England to deal with papal legates investigating the death of Thomas Becket in 1170, and then for France to suppress the Revolt of 1173–1174. His next involvement with Ireland was the Treaty of Windsor in 1175 with Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair.[3] However, with both Diarmuid and Strongbow dead (in 1171 and 1176 respectively) and Henry back in England, within two years this treaty was not worth the vellum it was inscribed upon. John de Courcy invaded and gained much of east Ulster in 1177, Raymond FitzGerald (known as Raymond le Gros) had already captured Limerick and much of the Kingdom of Thomond (also known as North Munster), while the other Norman families such as Prendergast, fitz-Stephen, fitz-Gerald, fitz-Henry and le Poer were actively carving out petty kingdoms for themselves. In 1185 Henry awarded his Irish territories to his 18-year-old youngest son, John, with the title Dominus Hiberniae ("Lord of Ireland"), and planned to establish it as a kingdom for him. When John unexpectedly succeeded his brother Richard as king in 1199, the Lordship became a possession of the English Crown. Subsequent assaults While the main Norman invasion concentrated on Leinster, with submissions made to Henry by the other provincial kings, the situation on the ground outside Leinster remained unchanged. However, individual groups of knights invaded: Connacht in 1175 and 1200–03, led by William de Burgh Munster in 1177, led by Raymond le Gros East Ulster in 1177, led by John de Courcy These further conquests were not planned by or made with royal approval, but were then incorporated into the Lordship under Henry's control, as with Strongbow's initial invasion
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Added Jan 15, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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The Norman invasion of Ireland was a two-stage process, which began on 1 May 1169 when a force of loosely associated Norman knights landed near Bannow, County Wexford at the request of Dermot MacMurrough (Diarmait Mac Murchada), the ousted King of Leinster, who sought their help in regaining his kingdom. On 18 October 1171, Henry II landed a much bigger army in Waterford to ensure his continuing control over the preceding Norman force. In the process he took Dublin and had accepted the fealty of the Irish kings and bishops by 1172, so creating the Lordship of Ireland, which formed part of his Angevin Empire. Background Wikisource has original text related to this article: Laudabiliter Wikisource has original text related to this article: Privilege of Pope Alexander III to Henry II Treaty of Windsor Pope Adrian IV, the only English pope, in one of his earliest acts issued a papal bull in 1155, giving Henry authority to invade Ireland as a means of ensuring reform by bringing the Irish Church more directly under the control of the Holy See.[1] Little contemporary use, however, was made of the bull Laudabiliter since its text enforced papal suzerainty not only over the island of Ireland but of all islands off of the European coast, including England, in virtue of the Constantinian Donation. The relevant text reads: There is indeed no doubt, as thy Highness doth also acknowledge, that Ireland and all other islands which Christ the Son of Righteousness has illumined, and which have received the doctrines of the Christian faith, belong to the jurisdiction of St. Peter and of the holy Roman Church. References to Laudabiliter become more frequent in the later Tudor period when the researches of the Renaissance humanist scholars cast doubt on the historicity of the Donation. But even if the Donation was spurious, other documents such as Dictatus papae (1075–87) reveal that by the 12th century the Papacy felt it had political powers superior to all kings and local rulers. Pope Alexander III, who was Pope at the time of the invasion, mentioned and reconfirmed the effect of Laudabiliter in his "Privilege" of 1172. Invasion of 1169 Original landing site for the invasion – Bannow Bay After losing the protection of Tyrone Chief, Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland, who died in 1166, MacMorrough was forcibly exiled by a confederation of Irish forces under the new High King, Rory O'Connor. MacMurrough fled first to Bristol and then to Normandy. He sought and obtained permission from Henry II of England to use the latter's subjects to regain his kingdom. Having received an oath of fealty from Dermod, Henry gave him letters patent in the following words: Henry, King of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, to all his liegemen, English, Norman, Welsh and Scotch, and to all the nations under his dominion, greeting. When these letters shall come into your hands, know ye, that we have received Dermod, Prince of Leinster, into the bosom of our grace and benevolence. Wherefore, whosoever, in the ample extent of all our territories, shall be willing to assist in restoring that prince, as our vassal and liegeman, let such person know, that we do hereby grant to him our licence and favour for the said undertaking.[2] By 1167 MacMurrough had obtained the services of Maurice Fitz Gerald and later persuaded Rhys ap Gruffydd Prince of Deheubarth to release Fitz Gerald's half-brother Robert Fitz-Stephen from captivity to take part in the expedition. Most importantly he obtained the support of the Earl of Pembroke Richard de Clare, known as Strongbow. The first Norman knight to land in Ireland was Richard fitz Godbert de Roche in 1167, but it was not until 1169 that the main body of Norman, Welsh and Flemish forces landed in Wexford. Within a short time Leinster was conquered, Waterford and Dublin were under Diarmait's control. Strongbow married Diarmait's daughter, Aoife, and was named as heir to the Kingdom of Leinster. This latter development caused consternation to Henry II, who feared the establishment of a rival Norman state in Ireland. Accordingly, he resolved to visit Leinster to establish his authority. Arrival of Henry II in 1171 Henry landed with a large fleet at Waterford in 1171, becoming the first King of England to set foot on Irish soil. Both Waterford and Dublin were proclaimed Royal Cities. In November Henry accepted the submission of the Irish kings in Dublin. In 1172 Henry arranged for the Irish bishops to attend the Synod of Cashel and to run the Irish Church in the same manner as the Church in England. Adrian's successor, Pope Alexander III, then ratified the grant of Ireland to Henry, ".. following in the footsteps of the late venerable Pope Adrian, and in expectation also of seeing the fruits of our own earnest wishes on this head, ratify and confirm the permission of the said Pope granted you in reference to the dominion of the kingdom of Ireland." Henry was happily acknowledged by most of the Irish Kings, who saw in him a chance to curb the expansion of both Leinster and the Normans. He then had to leave for England to deal with papal legates investigating the death of Thomas Becket in 1170, and then for France to suppress the Revolt of 1173–1174. His next involvement with Ireland was the Treaty of Windsor in 1175 with Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair.[3] However, with both Diarmuid and Strongbow dead (in 1171 and 1176 respectively) and Henry back in England, within two years this treaty was not worth the vellum it was inscribed upon. John de Courcy invaded and gained much of east Ulster in 1177, Raymond FitzGerald (known as Raymond le Gros) had already captured Limerick and much of the Kingdom of Thomond (also known as North Munster), while the other Norman families such as Prendergast, fitz-Stephen, fitz-Gerald, fitz-Henry and le Poer were actively carving out petty kingdoms for themselves. In 1185 Henry awarded his Irish territories to his 18-year-old youngest son, John, with the title Dominus Hiberniae ("Lord of Ireland"), and planned to establish it as a kingdom for him. When John unexpectedly succeeded his brother Richard as king in 1199, the Lordship became a possession of the English Crown. Subsequent assaults While the main Norman invasion concentrated on Leinster, with submissions made to Henry by the other provincial kings, the situation on the ground outside Leinster remained unchanged. However, individual groups of knights invaded: Connacht in 1175 and 1200–03, led by William de Burgh Munster in 1177, led by Raymond le Gros East Ulster in 1177, led by John de Courcy These further conquests were not planned by or made with royal approval, but were then incorporated into the Lordship under Henry's control, as with Strongbow's initial invasion
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1125 - 1199
Added Jan 15, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
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Angharad de Windsor de Barry married William de Barri (Barry) lived at Manorbier,Pembrokeshire, Wales They had four children: Robert de Barry (1120-1185) Philip de Barry (1125-1199) Walter de Barry (1130 Gerald Cambrensi de Barri (1135-1215) (archd. of Brecon)
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Added Jan 14, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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The Last Earls of Barrymore: Barons David de Barry, 1st Baron Barry (d. 1278). John Barry, 2nd Baron Barry (d. 1285) David FitzDavid Barry, 3rd Baron Barry (d. 1290) John Barry, 4th Baron Barry (d. 1330) David Barry, 5th Baron Barry (d. 1347) David Barry, 6th Baron Barry (d. 1392) John Barry, 7th Baron Barry (d. 1420) William Barry, 8th Baron Barry (d. 1480) John Barry, 9th Baron Barry (d. 1486) Thomas de Barry, 10th Baron Barry (d. 1488) William Barry, 11th Baron Barry (d. 1500) John Barry, 12th Baron Barry (d. 1530) John Barry, 13th Baron Barry (d. 1534) John FitzJohn Barry, 14th Baron Barry (1517–1553) (created Viscount Barry in 1541) Viscounts Buttevant (1541) John FitzJohn Barry, 1st Viscount Buttevant (1517–1553) Edmund FitzJohn Barry, 2nd Viscount Buttevant (d. 1556) James FitzJohn Barry, 3rd Viscount Buttevant (d. 1557) James de Barry, 4th Viscount Buttevant (b. c. 1520–1581) David Barry, 5th Viscount Buttevant (d. 1617) David Barry, 6th Viscount Buttevant (1604–1642) (created Earl of Barrymore in 1627/28) Earls of Barrymore (1627/28) David Barry, 1st Earl of Barrymore (1604–1642) Richard Barry, 2nd Earl of Barrymore (1630–1694) Laurence Barry, 3rd Earl of Barrymore (1664–1699) James Barry, 4th Earl of Barrymore (1667–1747) James Barry, 5th Earl of Barrymore (1717–1751) Richard Barry, 6th Earl of Barrymore (1745–1773) Richard Barry, 7th Earl of Barrymore (1769–1793) Henry Barry, 8th Earl of Barrymore (1770–1823)
Added Jan 13, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
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Gerald of Wales (c. 1146 – c. 1223), also known asGerald de Barry, Gerallt Gymroin Welsh or Giraldus Cambrensis in Latin, archdeacon of Brecon, was a medieval clergyman and chronicler of his times. Born ca. 1146 at Manorbier Castle in Pembrokeshire, Wales, he was of mixed Norman and Welsh descent; he is also known as Gerald de Barri. Gerald was son of William FitzOdo de Barry (or Barri), the common ancestor of the Barry family in Ireland and one of the most powerful Anglo-Norman barons in Wales at that time.[1] He was a maternal nephew of David fitzGerald, the Bishop of St David's and a grandson of Gerald de Windsor (alias FitzWalter),[2] Constable of Pembroke Castle, and Nest the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr. Through their mother, Angharad, Gerald and his siblings were closely related to Angharad's first cousin, Rhys ap Gruffydd, the Lord Rhys (Yr Arglwydd Rhys), and his family. Gerald received his initial education at the Benedictine house of Gloucester, followed by a period of study in Paris from ca 1165-74, where he studied the trivium. He was employed by Richard of Dover, the Archbishop of Canterbury, on various ecclesiastical missions in Wales, wherein he distinguished himself for his efforts to remove supposed abuses ofconsanguinity and tax laws flourishing in the Welsh church at the time. He was appointed archdeacon of Brecon, to which was attached a residence at Llanddew. He obtained this position by reporting the existence of the previous archdeacon's mistress; the man was promptly fired. While administrating this post, Gerald collected tithes of wool and cheese from the populace; the income from the archdeaconry supported him for many years. Upon the death of his uncle, the Bishop of St David's, in 1176, the chapter nominated Gerald as his successor. St David's had long-term aims of becoming independent of Canterbury, and the chapter may have thought that Gerald was the man to take up the cause. Henry II of England, fresh from his struggle with Thomas Becket, promptly rejected Gerald, possibly because his Welsh blood and ties to the ruling family of Deheubarth made him seem like a troublesome prospect, in favor of one of his Norman retainers Peter de Leia. According to Gerald, the king said at the time: "It is neither necessary nor expedient for king or archbishop that a man of great honesty or vigor should become Bishop of St. David's, for fear that the Crown and Canterbury should suffer thereby. Such an appointment would only give strength to the Welsh and increase their pride".[3] The chapter acquiesced in the decision; and Gerald, disappointed with the result, withdrew to the University of Paris. From ca 1179-8, he studied and taught canon law and theology. He returned to England and spent an additional five years studying theology. In 1180, he received a minor appointment from the Bishop of St. David's, which he soon resigned because of corruption he saw in the administration.
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1147 - 1223
Added Jan 13, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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Gerald de Windsor (1070 -1136), also known as Gerald FitzWalter, Constable of Pembroke Castle from 1102, was the nobleman in charge of the Norman forces in Wales in the late 11th century. Notably, he was the progenitor of the FitzGerald and de Barry dynasties of Ireland. These celebrated Hiberno-Norman or Cambro-Norman families, have been Peers of Ireland since the 14th Century at least. Odo’s grandson, Gerald of Wales, a 12th century scholar, gives the origin of his family's name, de Barry, in his Itinerarium Cambriae (1191): "Not far from Caerdyf is a small island situated near the shore of the Severn, called Barri, from St. Baroc … . From hence a noble family, of the maritime parts of South Wales, who owned this island and the adjoining estates, received the name of de Barri." Many family members later assisted in the Norman invasion of Ireland. For the family's services, King John of England awarded Philip's son, William de Barry, extensive baronies in the Kingdom of South Munster, specifically the defunct Uí Liatháin kingdom (O'Lethan and Imokilly) with its late seat at Castlelyons. Probably the first emigrant Gherardini was Otterus, or Othoer, son of Mathias, a son of Cosmus, the great Duke of Florence. They were also of the Ferrara-Modena branch of the House D'Este, the younger branch penetrating to the Teutonic domains of Charlemagne to found the royal families of Brunswick and Hanover in what is now Germany. Some records say that Otho went to Normandy in the caravan of King Canut of England who had passed through Florence on his way home from a pilgrimage to Rome. It is said that he came into England later with Edward the Confessor when he was called back from exile to be King of England. There is an old lyric quote in English records which says "the Earldom which to Otho brave, the Saxon sainted Edward gave". His son, Otho Fitz-Othoer appears in 1058 in the Domesday Book as a baron of England. This man, Otho, was the ancestor of Gerald de Windsor. Gerald was the ancestor of the Fitzgeralds,,Barrys,Barrymore, Fitzmaurices, Carews, Redmonds and Keatings of Ireland,
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1070 - 1136
Angharad de Windsor (de Barry) (Born 1104 Died 1176) foundress of the de Barry dynasty of Ireland who married William FitzOdo de Barry Angharad, who married to William Odo de Barry (William de Barry), Odo de Barry was the grantee of the immense manor of Manorbier in Pembrokeshire, which included the manors of Jameston and Manorbier Newton, as well as the manors of Begelly and Penally. He built the first motte-and-bailey at Manorbier. His son, William FitzOdo de Barry, is the common ancestor of the Barry family in Ireland. He rebuilt Manorbier Castle in stone and the family retained the lordship of Manorbier until the 15th century. • Children • Philip de Barry (fl. 1183), was a Cambro-Norman warrior from Manorbier in Pembrokeshire who participated in the colonisation of Kingdom of Desmond following the Norman invasion of Ireland. He was the founder of the Barry or De Barry family in County Cork, and common ancestor of the barons Barry and earls of Barrymore. Philip de Barry, founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland • Robert de Barry (fl. 1175) was a Cambro-Norman warrior from Manorbier in Pembrokeshire who participated in the colonisation of the Kingdom of Desmond following the Norman invasion of Ireland. • Edmond de Barry • Gerald of Wales (c. 1146 – c. 1223), also known as Gerallt Gymro in Welsh or Giraldus Cambrensis in Latin, archdeacon ofBrecon, was a medieval clergyman and chronicler of his times. Born ca. 1146 at Manorbier Castle in Pembrokeshire, Wales, he was of mixed Norman and Welsh descent; he is also known as Gerald de Barri. • Gerald was son of William FitzOdo de Barry (or Barri), the common ancestor of the Barry family in Ireland and one of the most powerful Anglo-Norman barons in Wales at that time.[1] He was a maternal nephew of David fitzGerald, the Bishop of St David's and a grandson of Gerald de Windsor (alias FitzWalter),[2] Constable of Pembroke Castle, and Nest the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr. Through their mother, Angharad, Gerald and his siblings were closely related to Angharad's first cousin, Rhys ap Gruffydd, the Lord Rhys (Yr Arglwydd Rhys), and his family. Barons Barry (c. 1261) • David de Barry, 1st Baron Barry (d. 1278) • John Barry, 2nd Baron Barry (d. 1285) • David FitzDavid Barry, 3rd Baron Barry (d. 1290) • John Barry, 4th Baron Barry (d. 1330) • David Barry, 5th Baron Barry (d. 1347) • David Barry, 6th Baron Barry (d. 1392) • John Barry, 7th Baron Barry (d. 1420) • William Barry, 8th Baron Barry (d. 1480) • John Barry, 9th Baron Barry (d. 1486) • Thomas de Barry, 10th Baron Barry (d. 1488) • William Barry, 11th Baron Barry (d. 1500) • John Barry, 12th Baron Barry (d. 1530) • John Barry, 13th Baron Barry (d. 1534) • John FitzJohn Barry, 14th Baron Barry (1517–1553) (created Viscount Barry in 1541) Viscounts Barry (1541) • John FitzJohn Barry, 1st Viscount Barry (1517–1553) • Edmund FitzJohn Barry, 2nd Viscount Barry (d. 1556) • James FitzJohn Barry, 3rd Viscount Barry (d. 1557) • James FitzRichard Barry, 4th Viscount Barry (b. c. 1520–1581) • David Barry, 5th Viscount Barry (d. 1617) • David Barry, 6th Viscount Barry (1604–1642) (created Earl of Barrymore in 1627/28) Earls of Barrymore (1627/28) • David Barry, 1st Earl of Barrymore (1604–1642) • Richard Barry, 2nd Earl of Barrymore (1630–1694) • Laurence Barry, 3rd Earl of Barrymore (1664–1699) • James Barry, 4th Earl of Barrymore (1667–1747) • James Barry, 5th Earl of Barrymore (1717–1751) Mother Nest ferch Rhys (b. c. 1085 - d. before 1136) was the only legitimate daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last King of Deheubarth, by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn of Powys. She is sometimes known, incorrectly, as "Nesta" or "Princess Nesta".[1][2] Father Gerald de Windsor (1070 -1136), also known as Gerald FitzWalter .Some time after the rebellion of the powerful Montgomery clan of Normandy and England, King Henry married Nest to Gerald de Windsor, Arnulf de Montgomery's former constable for Pembroke Castle and one of the recent Montgomery rebels. By Gerald, Nest is the maternal progenitor of the FitzGerald dynasty, one of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain..Angharad was the granddaughter Walter FitzOtho . FitzOtho became Constable of Windsor Castle immediately upon its completion by William I of England.[1] of They are referred to as Cambro-Normans or Hiberno-Normans, and have been Peers of Ireland since 1316, when Edward II created the earldom of Kildare for John FitzGerald. Gerald de Windsor held the office of Constable of Pembroke Castle from 1102 and was granted the manor of Moulsford in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire) by Henry I of England. The castle at Carew came with Nest as part of her dowry. Gerald demolished the wooden structure and built a motte and bailey in its place. In 1105, Gerald built the castle of Little Cenarch. Brother Robert Fitz-Stephen (c.1120–1183)[1] was a Cambro-Norman soldier, one of the leaders of the Norman invasion of Ireland, for which he was granted extensive lands in Ireland. He was a son of the famous Nest, daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, the last king of Deheubarth (South Wales). His father was Nest's second husband, Stephen, Constable of Cardigan (Welsh: Aberteifi). Following the death of her first husband, Gerald de Windsor, her sons had married her to Stephen, her husband's constable for Cardigan. By Stephen, she had another son, possibly two; the eldest was Robert, and the younger may have been Hywel. In Wales Robert rendered good service in the troubles of 1173 and was rewarded in 1177 by receiving from the king of England, jointly with Miles de Cogan, a grant of the kingdom of Cork, "from Lismore to the sea".[3] with the exception of the city of Cork. Cogan was the son of his half-sister Gwladys. The native princes of that province disputed the king's right to dispose of the territory on the grounds that they had not resisted king Henry, or committed any act that would have justified the forfeiture of their lands. In consequence, Fitz-Stephen had difficulty in maintaining his position and was nearly overwhelmed by a rising in the Kingdom of Desmond in 1182. Having no living male heirs, Fitz-Stephen eventually ceded these territories to Angharad son Philip de Barry, his half-nephew around 1180: References 1. ^ Rev. E. Barry, Records of the Barrys of County Cork from the earlist to the present time., Cork, 1902, pg 3. 2. ^ The Peerage: Gerald fitz Walter 3. ^ Geraldus Cambrensis, Vol. vi., p. 91. 4. ^ Welsh Biography Online 5. ^ Rev. E. Barry, Records of the Barrys of County Cork from the earliest to the present time., Cork, 1902, pg 4.
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Nest ferch Rhys (b. c. 1085 - d. before 1136) was the only legitimate daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last King of Deheubarth, by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn of Powys. She is sometimes known, incorrectly, as "Nesta" or "Princess Nesta" http://www.penrose.org/getperson.php?personID=I6407&tree=penrose She was a king's daughter, another's hostage, and mistress of a third. Her beauty made men tremble at the mention of her name. She was seized from the Celts by the Normans, abducted from her husband's bed by an infatuated rebel, vanished into the hills with him, and plunged a nation into war. She loved conquerors and conquered alike and had at least seven children by four different men. She was Helen of Troy. But in the pantheon of female history she suffered one handicap. She was Welsh. At last Princess Nest, daughter of King Rhys of Deheubarth, has been given her just deserts, albeit in an academic essay by Kari Maund (published by Tempus). The ancient bards and chroniclers did their best to jazz up her story, but are unreliable. Nest's clerical grandson, Gerald of Wales, hardly mentioned her, perhaps disapproving of her Norman liaisons. As a result, Maund's account of her life is mostly surmise. But Nest's ghost still flits through the castles where she lived, and Welsh girls are called Nesta (Welsh for Agnes) in her honour. The Norman invasion of Britain ground to a halt in the rain-soaked hills and tribal feuds of Wales. William the Conqueror settled his barons along Offa's Dyke and cut deals with the rulers of Powys, Gwynedd and Deheubarth to the west. In the last, he formally acknowledged Rhys ap Tewdwr as king and made a pilgrimage to St Davids. William's death in 1087 was a catastrophe for the Welsh. The cruel and insecure William Rufus encouraged his barons to march forth into Wales and plunder the principalities with which his father had sought peace. Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury, reached Cardigan Bay and turned south. Playing Welshman against Welshman, he wore down resistance until, in 1093, Rhys of Deheubarth was killed in battle outside Brecon. South Wales was overrun by Normans, and Nest, her mother and brothers were seized as hostages. The princess was probably no more than 12 at the time. As the virgin daughter of the last reigning king of Wales, she was a valuable asset in the murky world of Anglo-Celtic politics. Accustomed to the ways of Wales and familiar only with Irish and Vikings over the seas, she must have been terrified by William's rough and ruthless barons. Yet she was lovely enough to be taken into William II's court and catch the eye of Henry, his shrewd but lustful brother. A man whose womanising was noted even by medieval chroniclers, Henry was a dashing figure who had fathered some 20 illegitimate children by the time of his marriage and coronation as Henry I in 1100. His coupling with Nest, naked apart from their crowns, is the first depiction of such a relationship, in a medieval manuscript now in the British Library. The result was Henry Fitzhenry. The Welsh girl was clearly a fixture at the Norman court. Not for long. Nest was insufficiently high-born to be queen and was duly "donated" to Gerald of Windsor, the king's governor in the strategically crucial province of Pembroke. It was a clever move. Maund points out that, as daughter of its former king, she would "lend to a Norman lord some aura of legitimacy in the eyes of the Welsh ... a voice of some kind close to the centre of power". Gerald built for her a new castle at Carew. Two of their children carried Norman names, William and Maurice, and two Welsh, David and Angharad. Gerald knew no peace. The Welsh from the north were ever threatening, especially under the powerful prince of Powys, Cadwgan. Gerald built a new castle at what is now Cilgerran, on a spectacular bluff over the Teifi gorge. Here in 1109 he appears to have installed Nest, now in her late-20s and by all accounts a remarkable beauty. Cadwgan was raiding deep into the neighbouring country and held a great feast for his kinsmen, attended by his hot-blooded son, Owain. On hearing that Nest was nearby at Cilgerran, Owain and a band of friends fell on the castle, set fire to part of it and surrounded the chamber in which Gerald and Nest were asleep. Nest pleaded with her husband to hide for his life in the latrine tower. According to the chronicles, the infatuated Owain, "at the instigation of the Devil and moved by passion and love", entered the room and seized Nest, her children and the castle's treasure before making his escape. Her degree of compliance in this operation has long been a source of delighted Welsh conjecture, enhanced today by a walk along Cilgerran's massive walls and under its fragmentary chambers, where the mist rises from the Teifi below. Maund rather spoils the fun by claiming no evidence that Nest colluded in this romantic abduction, though her instinct for survival suggests at least a temporary compromise with her virtue. Owain's exploit was anything but wise. A proud Norman had lost his family and been incarcerated in his own loo. Carried off into the wilds of Ceredigion, Nest pleaded with Owain to release her children to Gerald, but he was a wanted man. Henry I, her old lover, was no fool. He summoned Cadwgan's many Welsh rivals and offered them all of Powys if they could rescue Nest and avenge Gerald. Somehow Nest found her way back to Pembroke, but Owain fled to Ireland, even his outraged father denying him protection. Nest's errant brothers now entered the picture, rising in rebellion against the Normans. Her loyalties must have been torn as her husband, brothers and cousins fought battle upon battle, often pitting Welshman against Welshman. Owain recklessly returned from Ireland to plunge into the general feuding, at one point carelessly finding himself fighting with Gerald's Normans against the marauding armies of Gwynedd. For Gerald the opportunity was too good to miss. He turned his Flemish archers on Owain and felled him in a hail of arrows. Gerald died some time in the 1120s, and the widowed Nest appears to have accepted the comfort of the sheriff of Pembroke, a Flemish settler named William Hait. She delivered him a son, also William. But she was soon married to the Norman constable of Cardigan, Stephen, with yet another son, Robert Fitzstephen, and possibly two, born when she must have been in her 40s. Half of Wales must have Nest's genes in their blood. Wars continued to swirl round her, sons fighting cousins in tragic rivalry and vendetta. We do not know when she died but she left Norman dynasties based on the Fitzstephens, lords of Cork in Ireland, Fitzgeralds, Fitzowens and Fitzhenrys. Meanwhile, her grandson by her daughter, Angharad, was a Welsh nationalist and the first British topographer, Gerald of Wales. Her son by Henry I gave his own son the charming name of Meilyr and others used such names as Gwladys and Hywel. The remarkable feature of the Norman conquest was that, unlike most such imperial ventures, it was a true marriage of peoples, a mingling of Norman, Celt and Saxon blood. They fought each other for centuries, but whatever quality is meant by Britishness was the outcome. No one more vividly initiated that melting pot than the exquisite Nest ap Rhys,The Princess of Wales. Nasta daughter Angharad, who married William Fitz Odo de Barry (William de Barry), by whom she was the mother of Philip de Barry, founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland Robert de Barry Edmond de Barry Gerald of Wales Nest is the maternal progenitor of the Fitzgerald and Barry dynasty, two of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain. Princess Nesta was a very remarkable woman. She is sometimes referred to as the "mother of the Irish invasion" since her sons, by various fathers, and her grandsons were the leaders of the invasion. She had, in the course of her eventful life, two lovers, two husbands, and many sons and daughters. Her father is quoted as saying that she had 10 children as a result of her matrimonial escapades, eight sons and two daughters, among them William fitzGerald de Windsor. One of her lovers was King Henry I of England. Some years before she married Gerald, her father, the fierce old Prince of South Wales, was fighting the English under Henry, (then the Prince and later King). Henry succeeded in taking the lovely Nesta as hostage. By this royal lover, she had two sons; Meyler fitzHenry and the celebrated Robert of Gloucester. It would seem that Gerald, busily engaged in military business, could have had no peace about his wife, since she was clever as well as beautiful, and every warrior seems to have fallen in love with her. In 1095, Gerald led an expedition against the Welsh on the borders of what is now Pembrokeshire. In 1100, he went to Ireland to secure for his lord, Arnulf Montgomery, the hand of the daughter of King Murrough in marriage. He was the first of the Geraldines to set foot in Ireland, where they were later to rule like kings. Later, Arnulf joined in a rebellion against the King, was deprived of his estates and exiled in 1102. Then the King granted custody of Pembroke Castle to Gerald. Later, he was appointed president of the County of Pembrokeshire. But it was Nesta that occupied the center of their stage during their marriage. Her beauty continued to excite wonder and desire throughout Wales. At Christmas in 1108, Cadwgan, Prince of Cardigan, invited the native chieftains to a feast at Dyvet (St. David's). Nesta's beauty was a subject of conversation. She excited the curiosity of Owen, the son of Prince Cadwgan, who resolved to see her. She was his cousin, so that the pretense of a friendly visit was easy. He successfully obtained admission with his attendants into Pembroke Castle. Her beauty -- it was even greater than he expected -- excited his lust. He determined to carry her off! In the middle of the night, he set fire to the castle, and his followers surrounded the room where Gerald and Nesta were sleeping. Gerald was awakened by the noise and about to discover the cause, but Nesta, suspecting some /treason, persuaded him to make his escape. She pulled up a board and let her husband escape down a drain by a rope. Then Owen broke open the door, seized Nesta and two of her sons, and carried them off to Powys, leaving the castle in flames. Owen had his way with Nesta, (historians say that one of her ten children was his), though whether she yielded from desire or force was uncertain. But at her request, Owen hastened to send back the two sons to Gerald. When King Henry heard of Nesta's abduction, he was furious. He regarded it as an injury almost personal, since Gerald was not only his steward, but his particular friend. The abduction of Nesta led to a war, which resulted in her return to her husband, and Owen fled to Ireland. Gerald took a conspicuous role in the fighting. In 1116, Henry ordered Owen, who had returned to Wales, to apprehend Gruffuyd, son of Rhys ap Tewdyr. As he passed through a wood on his march to join up with the royal forces, Owen seized some cattle. The owners of the cattle, as they fled, met Gerald, Constable of Pembroke. Gerald was also on his way to join the royal forces. When the cattle owners requested his assistance, he was only too delighted to have the opportunity for revenge for the insult to his honor done by Owen's abduction of Nesta. He lost no time in pursuing Owen, found him, and a skirmish followed. Owen was slain, an arrow piercing his heart, and Gerald's honor was avenged. Gerald died about 1135, leaving three sons and a daughter by Nesta. They were: Maurice, one of the principal leaders of the Irish invasion in 1169; William, ancestor of the families of Carew, Grace, Fitzmaurice, Gerald, and the Keatings of Ireland; David, who became bishop of St. David's; and Angareth, wife of William de Bari, and mother of the historian, Gerald Cambrensis. Nesta married again. Her second husband was Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had one son, Robert fitzStephen. Nesta's children and their descendants constituted a menace to the English rule of Wales. Royal Welsh blood mingled with the blood of the nobles of Normandy in all the half-brothers, sons of Gerald of Windsor and Stephen of Cardigan. Bastard or legitimate, they were turbulent princes in a /troubled land. Now fighting the Welsh natives, now allying themselves with their cousin, Nesta's brother Gruffuyd, the unconquered Prince of Wales, on whose head Henry had set "a mountain of gold", they remained a constant source of /trouble to the King, an ever-present threat to his security. It was thus that the Norman invasion of Ireland came about, and the Geraldines and de Barry's arrived in 1169.
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c. 1085 - c. 1136
Added Jan 13, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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The Norman knight Odo de Barri was granted the lands of Manorbier, Penally and Begelly in gratitude for his military help in conquering Pembrokeshire,Wales in 1103. The first castle was motte and bailey style, with the stone walls being added in the next century by later Normans. Giraldus Cambrensis, son of William de Barri, was born in the village in 1146, and called it "the pleasantest place in Wales".
Barryscourt Castle (Caisleán Chúirt an Bharraigh in Irish) is a castle located in eastern County Cork in southern Ireland, close to the town of Carrigtwohill.
Added Jan 12, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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The Barry's Castle in Buttevant, County Cork Ireland. Barry family: Named Buttevant after family motto: Boutez-en-Avant (Go Forward )
Added Jan 12, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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Coat of Arms of the Barry Family
Added Jan 12, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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Kevin Gerard Barry (Irish: Caoimhín de Barra ) (20 January 1902 – 1 November 1920) was the first Irish republican to be executed by the British since the leaders of the Easter Rising.[1] Barry was sentenced to death for his part in an IRA operation which resulted in the deaths of three British soldiers.[2] Barry's death is considered a watershed moment in the Irish conflict. His execution outraged public opinion in Ireland and throughout the world, because of his youth. The timing of his death was also crucial, in that his hanging came only days after the death on hunger strike of Terence MacSwiney - the republican Lord Mayor of Cork – and brought public opinion to fever-pitch. His treatment and death attracted great international attention and attempts were made by U.S., British, and Vatican officials to secure a reprieve. His execution and MacSwiney's death precipitated a dramatic escalation in violence as the Irish War of Independence entered its most bloody phase. Because of his refusal to inform on his comrades while under torture, Kevin Barry was to become one of the most celebrated of republican martyrs.[3][4] A ballad bearing his name, relating the story of his execution, is popular to this day.
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Unknown - Unknown
Added Jan 12, 2013 by: Kevin Barry
Kevin Barry
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John Barry (March 25, 1745 – September 13, 1803) was an officer in the Continental Navy during the American Revolutionary War and later in the United States Navy. He is often credited as "The Father of the American Navy" and was appointed a Captain in the Continental Navy on December 7, 1775.[1] He was the first Captain placed in command of a US warship commissioned for service under the Continental flag. Barry was born in Tacumshane, County Wexford, Ireland. Barry's family was driven from their ancestral home by the British. On October 24, 1768, Barry married Mary Cleary, who died in 1774. On July 7, 1777, he married Sarah Austin, daughter of Samuel Austin and Sarah Keen of New Jersey. Barry had no children, but he helped raise Patrick and Michael Hayes, children of his sister, Eleanor, and her husband, Thomas Hayes, who both died in the 1780s. Barry died at Strawberry Hill, in present-day Philadelphia on September 13, 1803, and was buried in the graveyard of Old St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in Center City, Philadelphia. Appointed senior captain upon the establishment of the U.S. Navy, he commanded the frigate United States in the Quasi-War with France. Barry authored a Signal Book published in 1780 to improve communications at sea among vessels traveling in formation.[11] On February 22, 1797, he was issued Commission Number 1 by President George Washington, backdated to June 4, 1794. His title was thereafter "Commodore." He is recognized as not only the first American commissioned naval officer but also as its first flag officer.[12] Barry's last day of active duty was March 6, 1801, when he brought the USS United States into port, but he remained head of the Navy until his death on September 12, 1803, from asthma. Barry died childless.
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1745 - 1803
My father, Alf. brother to Edward
Added Jul 11, 2009 by: William Barry
William Barry
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Taken Glendale Union Cemetery Cardington,Morrow,OH /Merrill Paul Barry born 12 Dec 1897 Morrow Co.,OH died 8 Jun 1980 Mt. Gilead,Morrow,OH-son of Charles Basil Barry(1856-1919) & Francelia Emery(1859-1938) /Mary Lovicy Sparks born 1 Oct 1911 Wells Co.,IN died 22 Jul 1966 Mt. Gilead,Morrow,OH-daughter of Lucion Otis Sparks(1879-1918) & Della May Wolfcale(1881-1966)
Mary Ellen Clark Barry & William Alvin Barry. Married 1920, Dallas Texas. Photo made circa 1942. Mary Ellen was known as "Sissy" & William was known as "Pee Wee". She was daughter of John R Clark & Julia Catherine Gragson. He was son of George Walker Barry & Maggie Lee Rogers.
Added Sep 6, 2005 by: KatheyKelley Hunt
KatheyKelley Hunt
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Picture of the Members of the Mack Avenue Business Men's Club in Detroit Michigan 1959.
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Jun 6, 1907 - Aug 10, 2000
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