Croft Family History & Genealogy

47 photos and 8,255 biographies with the Croft last name. Discover the family history, nationality, origin and common names of Croft family members.
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Croft Last Name History & Origin

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Updated Oct 17, 2018

History

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Name Origin

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Spellings & Pronunciations

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Nationality & Ethnicity

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Famous People named Croft

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Early Crofts

These are the earliest records we have of the Croft family.

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1360 - Unknown
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1372 - Unknown
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1790 - 1872
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1798 - 1856
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1799 - 1857
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1802 - 1878
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1813 - 1870
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1814 - 1897
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1819 - 1898

Croft Family Tree

Discover the most common names, oldest records and life expectancy of people with the last name Kroetch.

Search Croft biographies:

Most Common First Names

Sample of 20 Croft Biographies

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Jun 3, 1907 - Unknown
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Apr 6, 1916 - Sep 27, 2004
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Jun 15, 1914 - Apr 13, 2002
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Sep 20, 1909 - Oct 31, 2000
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Sep 16, 1898 - May 1972
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Dec 15, 1914 - Nov 3, 2007
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Mar 6, 1914 - Feb 25, 1988
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Aug 17, 1906 - November 1983
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Feb 8, 1914 - Sep 11, 1987
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Jan 31, 1928 - Dec 16, 2001
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Oct 7, 1953 - Sep 4, 2003
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Jan 21, 1918 - September 1973
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c. 1964 - Unknown
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c. 1953 - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown
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1842 - 1899
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1868 - 1943
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1892 - 1964
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1900 - 1983
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c. 1916 - Unknown

Croft Death Records & Life Expectancy

The average age of a Croft family member is 69.1 years old according to our database of 5,734 people with the last name Croft that have a birth and death date listed.

Life Expectancy

69.1 years

Oldest Crofts

These are the longest-lived members of the Croft family on AncientFaces.

Bio
Oct 10, 1884 - Apr 28, 1989
104 years
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Jul 11, 1884 - February 1989
104 years
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May 3, 1891 - Jun 8, 1995
104 years
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Jul 24, 1895 - Dec 23, 1998
103 years
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Mar 23, 1902 - Aug 17, 2005
103 years
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Jul 9, 1865 - August 1967
102 years
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Jan 3, 1884 - November 1985
101 years
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Aug 19, 1889 - Nov 16, 1990
101 years
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Jan 2, 1900 - Jan 21, 2001
101 years
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Jun 5, 1903 - Dec 28, 2004
101 years

Other Croft Records

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Share memories about your Croft family

Leave comments and ask questions related to the Croft family.

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On November 24, 1941, I was aboard the USS McFarland AVD-14, an old 4-stack destroyer. It had been converted to a seaplane tender, hauling aviation gasoline to naval airfields on remote islands. We were under Commander Patrol Wing 2 headquartered at Pearl. I had the mid-watch (12-4 a.m.) alone in the radio shack. I was suddenly hit with severe pains. The pains grew worse and I found I couldn't even stand up. I crawled on my hands and knees to the bridge (about 40 feet away) and called for help. I was taken to sick bay and the ships captain immediately set sail for the island of Palmyra which we had left about 8 hours earlier. We had no ships doctor. I was transferred to the infirmary on Palmyra and diagnosed as having an acute attack of appendicitis. No doctor was on Palmyra either so my lower extremities were packed in ice and I was flown to the Naval Hospital in Pearl. My appendix was removed on 11/25/41. My recovery complete, I was at the hospital as an "up" patient. The McFarland was at sea, I was waiting for her return. On the morning of 12/7/41, I was on the second floor veranda reading the Sunday paper. Suddenly a large group of planes flew over. The fellow next to me said "they must be having practice war maneuvers". I yelled "those are Japanese planes - see the rising sun insignia under their wings?" About that time, the torpedo bombers started diving and dropping torpedoes. The vantage point from the second floor of the hospital was such that you could view the entire harbor and the Naval Air Station directly across from the hospital. The old hospital stood on what was called "Hospital Point" at the entrance to Pearl. I saw just about every ship get hit either with torpedoes or bombs. It was like sitting in front of a TV screen with my eyes as cameras taking in everything taking place. It wasn't long before wounded men were brought into the hospital. All "up" patients were immediately brought into service to help the doctors, nurses and corpsmen. The hospital staff was overwhelmed by the number of injured being brought in. I was assigned to applying a burn salve on burn patients and applying loose bandages. Many were burned or injured so badly they were dying before they could be helped. After the nightmare of the first several days attending to the wounded and dying, I was assigned to the burial detail at Ieia Landing. There we had to try and identify bits and pieces of bodies. Arms, legs, torsos detached from their bodies were fingerprinted. Stenciled names on clothing, dog tags, anything that could be used to identify remains were used. The remains were placed in plain pine boxes, taken to the cemetery and given military burial. Many times while lifting the caskets to our shoulders, the putred body fluids would spill onto our own bodies. Quite an experience for an 18 year old.

During the attack, a Japanese plane was shot down and crashed into the medical experimental wing at the U.S. Naval Hospital. Certainly it was one of the very first planes shot down by U.S. Forces in World War 2. Several of us sailors ran to the crash site to extinguish the flames. I retrieved several pieces of metal and part of the pilots burned parachute to keep as souvenirs which I have passed on to my son as a memoir of Pearl Harbor.
Nov 28, 2003 · Reply
Rebecca Monday
58 favorites
Some of my fondiest memories are of my Grandma Lula (Croft) Freeman. She was without a doubt, the sweetest person I ever knew. I always enjoyed my visits to see Granma Lula. Born March 16,1891 to parents George Washington and Emma (Hilton) Croft. They always lived in Cherokee County, GA. Lula was the middle child of three children and the only girl. Her mother died shortly after the birth of the last child in 1894. George Washington married again to Lina Jane (New)on October 24, 1894, and grandma and her brothers were raised with their half brothers and sisters. from that marriage. Grandma Lula married Jess Oscar Freeman January 2, 1910. They had nine children, including a set of twins. Grandpa Jess died in December 1934. I never knew him. But, my grandma was still young and beautitful and never ever dreamed of remarriage. She always found time for her grandchildren along with her own children. I could not wait for any visit to my grandmother's house. Especially the Summer visits where I could stay longer being out of school. Grandma was a God fearing Christian woman. We did fun things together, cooking, listening to the radio, which she kept in the kitchen on top of the ice box, she spent most of her time in the kitchen cooking for her family and friends. She would always listen to her favorite soap opera and the news. I remember us huddling around the radio listening and hoping for a good report from the little girl (Kathy) that fell into the well in 1949? A sad ending to that story made us both cry. She had a fenced back yard and a dog named Fluff and I loved going outside to play with Fluff while grandma Lula sat on the back steps and watched us play. I will always love and remember my grandma Lula, she was certainly the Apple of my eye. She passed away in October of 1980 surrounded by family and friends. She is buried beside the love of her life, my grandpa Jess Freeman in Bascomb Church Cemetery, in Woodstock, (Cherokee County) GA. What an honor to remember her with a short story this close to Mother's Day.
May 05, 2006 · Reply
Michael Atkins
200 favorites
On November 24, 1941, I was aboard the USS McFarland AVD-14, an old 4-stack destroyer. It had been converted to a seaplane tender, hauling aviation gasoline to naval airfields on remote islands. We were under Commander Patrol Wing 2 headquartered at Pearl. I had the mid-watch (12-4 a.m.) alone in the radio shack. I was suddenly hit with severe pains. The pains grew worse and I found I couldn't even stand up. I crawled on my hands and knees to the bridge (about 40 feet away) and called for help. I was taken to sick bay and the ships captain immediately set sail for the island of Palmyra which we had left about 8 hours earlier. We had no ships doctor. I was transferred to the infirmary on Palmyra and diagnosed as having an acute attack of appendicitis. No doctor was on Palmyra either so my lower extremities were packed in ice and I was flown to the Naval Hospital in Pearl. My appendix was removed on 11/25/41. My recovery complete, I was at the hospital as an "up" patient. The McFarland was at sea, I was waiting for her return. On the morning of 12/7/41, I was on the second floor veranda reading the Sunday paper. Suddenly a large group of planes flew over. The fellow next to me said "they must be having practice war maneuvers". I yelled "those are Japanese planes - see the rising sun insignia under their wings?" About that time, the torpedo bombers started diving and dropping torpedoes. The vantage point from the second floor of the hospital was such that you could view the entire harbor and the Naval Air Station directly across from the hospital. The old hospital stood on what was called "Hospital Point" at the entrance to Pearl. I saw just about every ship get hit either with torpedoes or bombs. It was like sitting in front of a TV screen with my eyes as cameras taking in everything taking place. It wasn't long before wounded men were brought into the hospital. All "up" patients were immediately brought into service to help the doctors, nurses and corpsmen. The hospital staff was overwhelmed by the number of injured being brought in. I was assigned to applying a burn salve on burn patients and applying loose bandages. Many were burned or injured so badly they were dying before they could be helped. After the nightmare of the first several days attending to the wounded and dying, I was assigned to the burial detail at Ieia Landing. There we had to try and identify bits and pieces of bodies. Arms, legs, torsos detached from their bodies were fingerprinted. Stenciled names on clothing, dog tags, anything that could be used to identify remains were used. The remains were placed in plain pine boxes, taken to the cemetery and given military burial. Many times while lifting the caskets to our shoulders, the putred body fluids would spill onto our own bodies. Quite an experience for an 18 year old.

During the attack, a Japanese plane was shot down and crashed into the medical experimental wing at the U.S. Naval Hospital. Certainly it was one of the very first planes shot down by U.S. Forces in World War 2. Several of us sailors ran to the crash site to extinguish the flames. I retrieved several pieces of metal and part of the pilots burned parachute to keep as souvenirs which I have passed on to my son as a memoir of Pearl Harbor.
George W. Croft
CTCM U.S.N. Ret.
May 28, 2006 · Reply

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