Jacque Schwenke

Families researching: Birchett, Lingo, Pattillo, Ragland, Sanders

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Jacque Schwenke Hi Teddi! This certainly is taking me forever! Let me see if my Mom has more info on Thelma (my grandmother) and Anna. Sorry this is taking me so long! Jacque
Feb 10 · posted to the photo Bridesmaid Anna Halliday
Jacque Schwenke From: John Martin Campbellsburg, Ky To: John L. Ragland Bellcombrea Post Office Ballard Co., KY July 6th or 7th, 1851 Dear Friend, I embrace this opportunity of informing you that I am well and all the ballence of Father’s family is enjoying the same health. John I have been lying off to write for sometime. I received your letter and I was very glad to hear of you all. John, I have but very little of importance to write you but the best news is we are all well and our crops looks fine. Some of neighbors wheat was very thin and they did not cut it but Father’s wheat was very fine. The corn crops looks very promising. John I enjoyed myself very well this last six weeks. The twenty second day of May we had a great May walk at Newscastle and of all the ? there was there was a sight, Mr. Simmons female scholars and Mr. Williams male school schollars marcht out to Mr. Browns pasture, and there they all spoke and sang and the sixteenth day of June there was grate odd fellows and mason perrade and thear was too or three diff men spoke but that beat New Castle for pretty girls for Casra was thear. She can beat New Castle herself, not only that they had a brass band and thear was a good many ? from Cincinnate and Louisville and Madison and Tent and Vera. I forgot to tell you that we had brass bands at New Castle. On the fourth day of July thear was a great barbacue at Silgo for the sons of temprance and thear is said thear was about 5,000 thear. Thear is a sons of tempreace lodge in our town now, and have about 30 members. Sam Thisle and Thomas Bery have joint them. I must tell you of our big day on the fifth day of July. We hat a great Pick Nick party witch beat all the others. We hat our table out in Mr. Bowlars woods pasture and we hat two swings out on the ground. John we hat one best tables you ever sat. We hat oranges, pineaples, ice cream, lemonade, floats, and kinds of candyes. All kinds of cakes and all kinds of meats and everything that is good. Then Mrs. Feris marched her school and all neighboring out there and all the girls were dressed in white with a reethe and blew ribbon on thear heads and we plaid all day. John, it has rant nearly all day. Me and Mary Anne Lyda was going over to Canes Run and it rained so that we could not go. John, I am not married yet, but I will the first chance I get. G. Bartlett and Miss Baker are married at last. John give my best respects to all my friends tell T.P. Lenes that I don’t think he would speak to me since his family has increased so. Jesse Scott has got home from Hannover College. I must come to close. You must write me as soon as you get my letter. I wish you well. Your John J. Martin
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Ragland
Jacque Schwenke Charles Thomas Ragland was born, probably in 1844, in Henry County, Kentucky..family moved to McCraken and Ballard Counties while the children were still young. The following account was told to my grandmother, Thelma Ioma (Ragland) Sanders while still a girl. The following is the ONLY thing Charleswould say about his family. He refused to talk about it any further, and until 5 years ago, we didn’t know the names of any of his family members. We found those in a book about the Raglands. My Mother is an only child. Her mother went to heaven not knowing anything about her fathers family, and I would like to try to at least help my Mom find out who her distant cousins are. As told by Charles Thomas Ragland: At a young age, probably late teens, or early 20's, he returned from (somewhere..the war, we think) and his mother drew a hot bath for him. After he had lowered himself into the hot water, she came in with a broomstick and started beating him with it..yelling something about what he had "done". Charles had no idea as to what she was talking about, but he was given his inheritance,a horse, and told to leave the family. He was being disowned. What we found out: We don't know exactly when Charles left his home. He may have stayed in Paducah for a short time at a boarding house, and that information is questionable but came from a friend that found a Charles Ragland in a boarding house listed on a census. Charles traveled at some time to Arkansas, settling in Ozark. He took up work as a book keeper in a store called Conatzers. Coincidentally, my Grandfather Samuel Sanders, who would some day be son-in-law to Charles,(but after Charles passes on), traveled down the mountain from his home at Mountain Top, to sell goods in Ozark, and may have even met Mr.Ragland. While working in Ozark, Charles met my Great Grandmother, Melinda Jackson James, 1st cousin to Jesse and Frank James. They fell in love and married. In a strange twist to this story, a man named Edward Lingo JR. asked for the hand of Melinda from her father. He refused, saying it would not be right for Melinda to marry ahead of her older sister Tiny. Edward Lingo instead married Tiny, and became brother-in-law to Melinda. Remember Edwards name, you are going to hear it again in this strange story. After Charles and Melinda married, they moved to Tom Bean, Texas, where my grandmother, Thelma Ioma Ragland, and her older sister Carrie, and brother Ray were born. Charles ran a store there, and they were a very happy and successful family during that time. He made it clear to his family that he did not want to talk about where he had come from, or the circumstances surrounding his loss of family. He only mentioned that he had a brother who was a Baptist Preacher, and a sister. He said that Thelma looked like his sister, and told the story of his mother whipping him. Tiny, Melindas older sister who had married Mr. Lingo, became ill, and died. Ed Lingo then started "bothering", (as my grandmother put it), her mother, Melinda. One day, Charles Thomas suddenly left for Oklahoma, taking his gun, which he never used, with him looking for Ed Lingo. Charles went back home to Texas in a coffin, his pocket watch and gun gone. My grandmother Thelma was 14 years old when her father died. Ed Lingo then married Melinda, so that they could combine both families, since Melinda felt she needed to care for her sisters children. They moved the family to Durant, Oklahoma. When Thelma was around 16 years of age, Samuel George Sanders (mentioned above) came riding up, coming to visit HIS Uncle Ed Lingo! Samuel and Ed were related through a Sanders/Lingo marriage. Thelma and Samuel fell in love, and married in 1923. On a trip to their new home, the train had a lay-over in Missouri. Samuel decided to get a haircut there at the station, and had Thelma wait outside on a bench for him. She noticed a woman walking back and forth in front of her on the walkway, and as the woman would pass, she would look at Thelma in the face. Finally the woman approached Thelma, and asked just one question: "Would you be the daughter of Charles Thomas Ragland?" When Thelma answered, "Yes!", the woman burst into tears and ran off. Apparently Thelma DID look just like Charles’ sister, or at least like her father. Years later, when Thelma and her brother Ray were grown, and Melinda had passed away, Ed Lingo called Thelma and asked if she and Samuel would come and take him to see Ray, that he had something to give him. No one could stand Ed Lingo, but at the thought of seeing her brother, she agreed. Thelma and Samuel would drive to Ed Lingo’s house and spend the night, then drive on to Rays house the next morning. Thelma and Samuel arrived at Ed’s house and spent the evening talking with him. During the conversation, he mentioned again that he had something to give to Ray. He decided to show it to Thelma and Samuel. Imagine their surprise when it turned out to be Charles Thomas' missing gun! Thelma was seething, but did not show it. Ed didn't realize that she and her brother Ray were aware that their father returned in a coffin without his gun! That night, while Ed was asleep, Thelma went in and took the gun, hiding it under Samuel’s "medicinal" whiskey bottle in the suitcase. The next morning when they were to leave, Ed couldn't find the gun, and thought he had misplaced it. Thelma played her game, and acted as if she were trying to help him find it, knowing all along that it was hidden in her suitcase. When they arrived at Rays house, Thelma gave the gun to her brother in private. We have only one picture of Charles Thomas, and he is old in the picture. (see PHOTOS>FAMILY>RAGLAND Charles Thomas' parents, and siblings are as follows: James R. Ragland wife: Agnes A. Abernathy children: Charles Thomas Ragland wife: Malinda Jackson James Sarah Elizabeth Ragland husband: James Harper Robert Luther Ragland (Baptist Minister) wife: ? name died of Pneumonia Barlow Dec. 16, 1906 Melissa Ann Ragland husband: William H. Simpson Martha Alice Ragland husband: P.O. Foree William N. Ragland wife: ? Mary A. Ragland husband: ? I am asking that if anyone knows anything about this family, or has heard any stories simular to what Charles told, please let me know! Jacqueline Jeanne (Birchett) Schwenke
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Ragland
Jacque Schwenke My daugher Beth had written to my mother, (Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett), and asked if it was "okay" to write to soldiers stationed overseas. This is the reply from my Mother to Beth. **************** It isn’t like it used to be, when we were not afraid to give information about ourselves. We used to stand on the platform at the train station and watch the troop trains go by. The GIs always had the windows open, leaning out, waving and yelling. They threw paper wads at us, and we would pick them up and read the notes they would write. It was always just an address to write to them. I would write to a few. It was something to do. We lived in the little town called Atwood, (Oklahoma), with not a thing to do. The song "They're Either Too Young Or Too Old" sure did hit the nail on the head for us. Most of the boys had joined the Navy, (as soon as they turned 17, they'd do it if they could get their parents to sign for them), and the young men who didn’t do that got drafted or they'd go ahead and join in order to avoid getting drafted, where there was no choice about which branch they were put in. So, writing letters became sort of 2nd nature to me. After a while, and an exchange of a few letters, the boys would stop writing. No telling what had happened to them. Sent overseas, or they had a new girl friend, or were lost, or killed. It was such a bitter-sweet time. So very sad in so many ways. I always wrote letters to my cousins who were in the service. There was Tom Johnson, in the Army, and the Bruce brothers: Boyce, Noel, Glenn, and Ray. Boyce was in the Army; he came up through Italy from north Africa. Noel was also in the Army and was in the Battle of the Bulge. Glenn, who was in the Air Corps, was stationed in England as part of ground crew taking care of the B-17s. The youngest, Ray was in the Army, but he never went overseas. The war was over before he had to go fight. My Cousins G.W. and Bill James were from Pampa, Texas. G.W. was in the Air Corps and Bill in the Navy. I had a Seabee cousin; Benny Clement and a Coast Guard cousin Thomas Sparks. Aunt Leona Pattillo had a stepson; Byron Pattillo who was lost when his ship went down in the Pacific. I had some other more distant cousins and they all were in uniform: Byron Lingo, who was in the Army, and J. Jarvis, who was in the Air Corps, and flew the hump. My Navy boy friend from Holdenville (Oklahoma); Gail Secrest was killed aboard ship. My boyfriend from Detroit, (Alvin Duvall), was with the 5th Marines fighting all over the Pacific and actually made it home alive. (He was in a platoon of 30 men, stationed for training on the west coast, when all 30 of them wrote to me. All on the same day, and in separate envelopes. They all got to our little post office on the same day, ) Needless to say. our Post Master, Sam Irwin was really put out of joint, and it got all over town. Aunt Leona, (Pattillo), was just scandalized, and Moma, (Thelma Ioma Sanders), wasn’t too happy, but at least she could see the joke in it. Actually, all we had was the mail. And then, the overseas mail was censored. I didn’t meet your Grandpa, (Raymond George Birchett; Holdenville, OK), until he was home from the fighting. It's a wonder he wasn’t killed. He sure was in a good position for it. I intend to find that poem, Christmas of '44. It is good. I'll send you a copy. Well, I'll bet you're sorry you asked me. So, I say, just go ahead and send cards, and write saying who you are, and what you do and where you live and how it is for Christmas where you are. Some lonesome person may get a real kick out of it, and perhaps write you back. If you don't like what you get, you don't need to continue writing. But be forewarned, sometimes, lonesome guys will get serious real quick. You have to learn to "Let 'em down easy," so to speak. That comes under the same heading of " Always leave 'em laughing." Well kiddo, its time for bed, so I guess I will go. Write soon, Love, Grandma
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Sanders
Jacque Schwenke You asked about when Moma Jack and Uncle Ed Lingo moving to the Durant area.....Well I don’t really know when. It had to have been after C.T. Ragland died. Also, I don't know when or where Moma Jack and Uncle Ed got married. So, Charles Thomas Ragland and Malinda Jackson (Jackie) James married in Ozark, Arkansas and moved to the Tom Bean, Texas area. (their store was in the town of TomBean, but they lived in White Mound) But Moma told me that when she was little, Aunt Carrie,(who was 14 years older than Moma), would walk to their store and that their father would give her a big Hershey Bar to take home and share among the 3 kids. So, if they were living in White Mound, how did Aunt Carrie WALK to the store. I just wish I had thought to ask Moma. Aunt Carrie and her husband, Sam Bruce, came to visit Moma and Daddy while we were in Berlin, and Moma and Daddy were living in our house in OKC. They all took a drive out to Frontier City, and saw the skit where the outlaws stage a holdup, and the LAW arrests them. Of course there is a shootout. Moma said that Aunt Carrie laughed and told Moma that it was just like when they lived at TomBean. That was where Moma Jack got rid of the drunk cowboy who was on his horse, waving his six-shooter around threatening to kill C.T. Ragland and demanding to know his whereabouts. Moma Jack quietly asked him to wait; went into the house and got a teakettle of boiling water, came back out and poured it on the horse. Of course, the horse bolted, running away at a full gallop with the cowboy hanging on for dear life. Moma Jack was some nervy lady. Well, back to the move to Durant. C.T. Ragland died 1916. Malinda J. (James) Ragland married George E. Lingo and moved to the Durant,Ok. area. I would say that the move had to be pretty soon after C.T. died. Moma was 14 years old when her Dad died, and she continued to go to school after moving to Durant. They lived in the Lone Oak school district. It's on the map, near the Blue River, just a little way from Durant. Moma was about 16 when Daddy came to visit his uncle Lingo, and saw Moma for the first time. They were married when she was 18 years old, in Feb.1923. That sounds like an error, but Momas birth date is Nov. 25, and depending on the dates of the events might make it sound like that. I have no idea how long Moma Jack and Uncle Ed lived there, or when they made the move to West Texas, as I told you in as earlier E-mail, it had to be before about 1930. ~Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Lingo
Jacque Schwenke ~As told by Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett~ You asked about when Moma Jack and Uncle Ed Lingo moving to the Durant area.....Well I don’t really know when. It had to have been after C.T. Ragland died. Also, I don't know when or where Moma Jack and Uncle Ed got married. So, Charles Thomas Ragland and Malinda Jackson (Jackie) James married in Ozark, Arkansas and moved to the Tom Bean, Texas area. (their store was in the town of Tom Bean, but they lived in White Mound) But Moma told me that when she was little, Aunt Carrie,(who was 14 years older than Moma), would walk to their store and that their father would give her a big Hershey Bar to take home and share among the 3 kids. So, if they were living in White Mound, how did Aunt Carrie WALK to the store. I just wish I had thought to ask Moma. Aunt Carrie and her husband, Sam Bruce, came to visit Moma and Daddy while we were in Berlin, and Moma and Daddy were living in our house in OKC. They all took a drive out to Frontier City, and saw the skit where the outlaws stage a holdup, and the LAW arrests them. Of course there is a shootout. Moma said that Aunt Carrie laughed and told Moma that it was just like when they lived at Tom Bean. That was where Moma Jack got rid of the drunk cowboy who was on his horse, waving his six-shooter around threatening to kill C.T. Ragland and demanding to know his whereabouts. Moma Jack quietly asked him to wait; went into the house and got a teakettle of boiling water, came back out and poured it on the horse. Of course, the horse bolted, running away at a full gallop with the cowboy hanging on for dear life. Moma Jack was some nervy lady. Well, back to the move to Durant. C.T. Ragland died 1916. Malinda J. (James) Ragland married George E. Lingo and moved to the Durant,Ok. area. I would say that the move had to be pretty soon after C.T. died. Moma was 14 years old when her Dad died, and she continued to go to school after moving to Durant. They lived in the Lone Oak school district. It's on the map, near the Blue River, just a little way from Durant. Moma was about 16 when Daddy came to visit his uncle Lingo, and saw Moma for the first time. They were married when she was 18 years old, in Feb.1923. That sounds like an error, but Momas birth date is Nov. 25, and depending on the dates of the events might make it sound like that. I have no idea how long Moma Jack and Uncle Ed lived there, or when they made the move to West Texas, as I told you in as earlier E-mail, it had to be before about 1930.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Ragland
Jacque Schwenke You asked about when Moma Jack and Uncle Ed Lingo moving to the Durant area.....Well I don’t really know when. It had to have been after C.T. Ragland died. Also, I don't know when or where Moma Jack and Uncle Ed got married. So, Charles Thomas Ragland and Malinda Jackson (Jackie) James married in Ozark, Arkansas and moved to the Tom Bean, Texas area. (their store was in the town of TomBean, but they lived in White Mound) But Moma told me that when she was little, Aunt Carrie,(who was 14 years older than Moma), would walk to their store and that their father would give her a big Hershey Bar to take home and share among the 3 kids. So, if they were living in White Mound, how did Aunt Carrie WALK to the store. I just wish I had thought to ask Moma. Aunt Carrie and her husband, Sam Bruce, came to visit Moma and Daddy while we were in Berlin, and Moma and Daddy were living in our house in OKC. They all took a drive out to Frontier City, and saw the skit where the outlaws stage a holdup, and the LAW arrests them. Of course there is a shootout. Moma said that Aunt Carrie laughed and told Moma that it was just like when they lived at TomBean. That was where Moma Jack got rid of the drunk cowboy who was on his horse, waving his six-shooter around threatening to kill C.T. Ragland and demanding to know his whereabouts. Moma Jack quietly asked him to wait; went into the house and got a teakettle of boiling water, came back out and poured it on the horse. Of course, the horse bolted, running away at a full gallop with the cowboy hanging on for dear life. Moma Jack was some nervy lady. Well, back to the move to Durant. C.T. Ragland died 1916. Malinda J. (James) Ragland married George E. Lingo and moved to the Durant,Ok. area. I would say that the move had to be pretty soon after C.T. died. Moma was 14 years old when her Dad died, and she continued to go to school after moving to Durant. They lived in the Lone Oak school district. It's on the map, near the Blue River, just a little way from Durant. Moma was about 16 when Daddy came to visit his uncle Lingo, and saw Moma for the first time. They were married when she was 18 years old, in Feb.1923. That sounds like an error, but Momas birth date is Nov. 25, and depending on the dates of the events might make it sound like that. I have no idea how long Moma Jack and Uncle Ed lived there, or when they made the move to West Texas, as I told you in as earlier E-mail, it had to be before about 1930. ~Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Lingo
Jacque Schwenke You asked about when Moma Jack and Uncle Ed Lingo moving to the Durant area.....Well I don’t really know when. It had to have been after C.T. Ragland died. Also, I don't know when or where Moma Jack and Uncle Ed got married. So, Charles Thomas Ragland and Malinda Jackson (Jackie) James married in Ozark, Arkansas and moved to the Tom Bean, Texas area. (their store was in the town of TomBean, but they lived in White Mound) But Moma told me that when she was little, Aunt Carrie,(who was 14 years older than Moma), would walk to their store and that their father would give her a big Hershey Bar to take home and share among the 3 kids. So, if they were living in White Mound, how did Aunt Carrie WALK to the store. I just wish I had thought to ask Moma. Aunt Carrie and her husband, Sam Bruce, came to visit Moma and Daddy while we were in Berlin, and Moma and Daddy were living in our house in OKC. They all took a drive out to Frontier City, and saw the skit where the outlaws stage a holdup, and the LAW arrests them. Of course there is a shootout. Moma said that Aunt Carrie laughed and told Moma that it was just like when they lived at TomBean. That was where Moma Jack got rid of the drunk cowboy who was on his horse, waving his six-shooter around threatening to kill C.T. Ragland and demanding to know his whereabouts. Moma Jack quietly asked him to wait; went into the house and got a teakettle of boiling water, came back out and poured it on the horse. Of course, the horse bolted, running away at a full gallop with the cowboy hanging on for dear life. Moma Jack was some nervy lady. Well, back to the move to Durant. C.T. Ragland died 1916. Malinda J. (James) Ragland married George E. Lingo and moved to the Durant,Ok. area. I would say that the move had to be pretty soon after C.T. died. Moma was 14 years old when her Dad died, and she continued to go to school after moving to Durant. They lived in the Lone Oak school district. It's on the map, near the Blue River, just a little way from Durant. Moma was about 16 when Daddy came to visit his uncle Lingo, and saw Moma for the first time. They were married when she was 18 years old, in Feb.1923. That sounds like an error, but Momas birth date is Nov. 25, and depending on the dates of the events might make it sound like that. I have no idea how long Moma Jack and Uncle Ed lived there, or when they made the move to West Texas, as I told you in as earlier E-mail, it had to be before about 1930. ~Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Lingo
Jacque Schwenke Monterey, Owen County To: Mr. John L. Ragland Esq. Bellombora Post Office Ballard County, KY Jan 30, 1854 Dear Brother J.L. Ragland, I embrace the present moment to redeame my promise. I told you that I would write to you as soon as Penelope was confined. I hope you and Rebecca landed home safe and I hope you found all the friends well. Penelope was confined the 25th day of January. She has a fine daughter and she is doing as well as she can. The rest of the family are in tolerable health. Bills hand is not much better. He will not be able to do any work this winter. I have nothing new to write to you. The Captain is very proud of his find daughter. He staid with her from Sunday until Friday. They have named the child Sally Dulcena Sanders. It had name enough to kill it. You must give my respects to old man and the Lady. To Sally, Edmund and Mary, to James and Agnes. I would be glad to sea them all. Tell Rebecca that I miss her very much. Tell her that Penelope say that she will write to her as soon as she gets abel. John, you must write to me as soon as my letter comes to hand and let me know how you are. Don’t fail to right. I am anxious to hear form you. Tell Edmund I shall expect him to come and sea me when he comes up to Louisville with he tobacco. I would be glad to come and sea you all this spring, but I don’t know wheather I can or not having done nothing this winter. I have a great deal of work to do. James is compeled to go to school and I have to work. When you right give me all the news. Yours in hope of immortality James E. Duvalt
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Ragland
Jacque Schwenke This is part of a letter I recieved from my Mother when asking about the Charles Thomas Ragland/George Edward Lingo families, from Texas. You asked about when Moma Jack and Uncle Ed Lingo moving to the Durant area.....Well I don’t really know when. It had to have been after C.T. Ragland died. Also, I don't know when or where Moma Jack and Uncle Ed got married. So, Charles Thomas Ragland and Malinda Jackson (Jackie) James married in Ozark, Arkansas and moved to the Tom Bean, Texas area. (their store was in the town of TomBean, but they lived in White Mound) But Moma told me that when she was little, Aunt Carrie,(who was 14 years older than Moma), would walk to their store and that their father would give her a big Hershey Bar to take home and share among the 3 kids. So, if they were living in White Mound, how did Aunt Carrie WALK to the store. I just wish I had thought to ask Moma. Aunt Carrie and her husband, Sam Bruce, came to visit Moma and Daddy while we were in Berlin, and Moma and Daddy were living in our house in OKC. They all took a drive out to Frontier City, and saw the skit where the outlaws stage a holdup, and the LAW arrests them. Of course there is a shootout. Moma said that Aunt Carrie laughed and told Moma that it was just like when they lived at TomBean. That was where Moma Jack got rid of the drunk cowboy who was on his horse, waving his six-shooter around threatening to kill C.T. Ragland and demanding to know his whereabouts. Moma Jack quietly asked him to wait; went into the house and got a teakettle of boiling water, came back out and poured it on the horse. Of course, the horse bolted, running away at a full gallop with the cowboy hanging on for dear life. Moma Jack was some nervy lady. Well, back to the move to Durant. C.T. Ragland died 1916. Malinda J. (James) Ragland married George E. Lingo and moved to the Durant,Ok. area. I would say that the move had to be pretty soon after C.T. died. Moma was 14 years old when her Dad died, and she continued to go to school after moving to Durant. They lived in the Lone Oak school district. It's on the map, near the Blue River, just a little way from Durant. Moma was about 16 when Daddy came to visit his uncle Lingo, and saw Moma for the first time. They were married when she was 18 years old, in Feb.1923. That sounds like an error, but Momas birth date is Nov. 25, and depending on the dates of the events might make it sound like that. I have no idea how long Moma Jack and Uncle Ed lived there, or when they made the move to West Texas, as I told you in as earlier E-mail, it had to be before about 1930. ~Georgene Jackson (Sanders) Birchett
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Lingo
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