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Kathy Pinna

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Updated: April 16, 2024

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Christian T Selway
Christian T Selway
Photo of Christian T Selway included with his August 2000 obituary. Christian passed away in New Jersey at the young age of 17.
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Herbert Sokol
Herbert Sokol
1942 yearbook photo of Herbert Sokol in his senior year at Susan Miller Dorsey High School in Los Angeles, California.
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Margie L Keith
Margie L Keith
1957 yearbook photo of Margie L Keith at Leroy High School in Leroy, Alabama.
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Paul A Shelby
Paul A Shelby
1973 yearbook photo of Paul A Shelby at Girard High School in Girard, Ohio.
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. . .dies of covid-19 HUNTSVILLE, Texas — A onetime henchman of one of the Houston area’s most notorious serial killers has died of covid-19, officials said Wednesday. David Owen Brooks was 65 when he died in a Galveston prison hospital on May 28, two weeks after he had been hospitalized with symptoms consistent with the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, according to the Texas Department of Criminal Justice website. He also suffered from a number of preexisting conditions but did test positive for the virus, and preliminary results of an autopsy suggested it was a contributing cause of his death. Brooks was serving six life sentences in prison for his part in the reign of terror by Dean Corll, who killed at least 28 teenage boys and young men in Houston in the 1970s. Corll, a Houston electric company worker and former candy store owner, used Brooks and fellow teen Elmer Wayne Henley to lure youngsters to his apartment, where they were handcuffed and shackled to a plywood torture board before being sexually assaulted and killed. Henley, who said he shot and killed Corll in 1973 in self-defense after hours of drinking and glue sniffing at Corll’s Pasadena house, also is serving six life sentences. Police then recovered the bodies of their victims, most from Corll’s southwest Houston boat shed. Other bodies were buried in remote areas of East Texas and at the beach. The killings were called the Houston Mass Murders — at the time, the worst in U.S. history. Most of the bodies were badly decomposed, their identities obscured by time and elements. A few were buried with mementos that whispered of their youth and the fashions of the day: a brown fringed leather jacket, ankle-high leather boots, shorts in a tie-dyed pattern. The condition of their bodies hinted of agony in their final minutes. Henley, who turned 64 on Tuesday, became eligible for parole in 1983 but has been denied release repeatedly. - The Associated Press on June 10, 2020 at 10:38 p.m. Photo of David Brooks David Brooks
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Christian T Selway
Christian T Selway
Photo of Christian T Selway included with his August 2000 obituary. Christian passed away in New Jersey at the young age of 17.
People tagged:
Herbert Sokol
Herbert Sokol
1942 yearbook photo of Herbert Sokol in his senior year at Susan Miller Dorsey High School in Los Angeles, California.
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Margie L Keith
Margie L Keith
1957 yearbook photo of Margie L Keith at Leroy High School in Leroy, Alabama.
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Paul A Shelby
Paul A Shelby
1973 yearbook photo of Paul A Shelby at Girard High School in Girard, Ohio.
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Opal L Hood
Opal L Hood
Photo of Opal L Hood included in her 1993 obituary in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.
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Margaret M Halbeisen
Margaret M Halbeisen
1937 yearbook photo of Margaret at Waite High School in Toledo, Ohio.
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Life Starts Anew for Nipponese Lad HOLLYWOOD, September 26 - Little Alex Hayes has become Yukio Hayakawa, and with the change in name has entered into a new life to be filled with all the advantages wealthy and noted parents can afford. The two-and-a-half-year-old Japanese lad, born in Chicago and given an English name by his mother, is now through official adoption the son of Sessue Hayakawa, screen and stage star, and his wife, the former Tsuru Aoki. Behind the official records of the adoption is a story of an old friendship cherished by Hayakawa even though its object, the father of little Yukio, is dead. The boy's real father, Hayashi by name, was a member of a politically important family in Japan, and a close friend of the star. MOTHER GIVES CONSENT: A graduate of Cambridge, Hayashi was studying for a degree at the University of Chicago, preparatory to entering the diplomatic service of Japan, when pneumonia ended his life shortly before his son was born. Hayakawa, then in Japan, sought at once to adopt the child, and repeated his offer of adoption when he first saw Yukio 15 months ago. Recently the boy's mother, unable to support his longer, accepted the offer and the Hayakawas brought them to Los Angeles to begin adoption proceedings. The lad lived with the Hayakawas several weeks before the adoption legally was sanctioned, and once, when it appeared momentarily uncertain that it could be arranged, he was sent back to his mother. THIRD ADOPTED CHILD: "We didn't want to become too attached to him, or let him become too attached to us, if we could not keep him always," explained Hayakawa. But now Yukio is happily established as the son of wealthy and devoted parents. Yukio is a bright youngster, as happy to be with the Hayakawas as they are to have him. His new foster-parents, themselves childless, already have reared two adopted children, orphaned sister who were both married about four years ago. Little Yukio, child of their old frend and boasting an illustrious parentage, is taking their place. - The Tampa Tribune (Tampa, Florida) Sunday, September 27, 1931 on page 28. Photo of Yukio Hayakawa Yukio Hayakawa
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April L Johnson
April L Johnson
1994 yearbook photo of April at Buckeye High School in Deville, Louisiana.
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Doris Hardingham
Doris Hardingham
The newspaper announcement of Doris Van Doren to Ebbitt Westervelt Hardingham in The Courier-News (Bridgewater, New Jersey) on Saturday November 29th, 1947
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Alicia Bond
Alicia Bond
Actress Alicia Bond in the film "Helpful" in the year 1972.
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Anna L Kramen
Anna L Kramen
1931 yearbook of Anna at Harrison Technical School in Chicago, Illinois.
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Famed Televangelist opened Bible-themed attraction in San Diego Morris Cerullo, the famed and sometimes controversial televangelist who opened a $200 million Bible-themed attraction in Mission Valley last December, passed away on Friday in a San Diego hospital after a brief bout with pneumonia. He was 88. In December, the Rancho Santa Fe resident told The San Diego Union-Tribune that he hoped that his massive new Morris Cerullo Legacy International Center would reflect his lifetime of service, both to his faith and to the millions of people he ministered to throughout his life. “I’m 88 years of age, and my time on this Earth may not be very long,” Cerullo said. “I wanted to leave something that would be of value and speak to the principles I’ve upheld for the past 70 years. All I can tell you is that everybody is welcome at the Legacy Center. We can’t draw any lines of demarcation. It’s like saying Jesus didn’t die for the Muslims. He died for the world. Our job is to love everybody and to love them sincerely but not hypocritically.” Tributes to Cerullo — who ran ministry programs in more than 150 nations on six continents — have poured in from Christian leaders around the world. Israeli televangelist Benny Hinn wrote that he couldn’t imagine his life without the time he spent with Cerullo, whose nickname among friends and followers was “Papa.” “I’ve never met anyone who was more on fire for the cause of Christ,” Hinn wrote. “The intensity of the flames that burned in his heart for the lost was contagious, and I never walked away from spending time with him without my life changed forever.” On Twitter, founding Bishop Mike Okonkwo of The Redeemed Evangelical Mission in Nigeria wrote that Cerullo was a “good soldier of Christ.” “You fought a good fight, finished your course and kept the faith,” Okonkwo tweeted. “Our consolation is that you lived an impactful life, raising men across the globe for Jesus.” Cerullo also faced controversy during his long career. His miracle-healing crusades were the subject of negative news coverage and public uproar in the United Kingdom, India and Brazil. He also faced tax-evasion charges for under-representing his income from 1998 to 2000, but the 2007 California case against him was dismissed due to improperly administered jury instructions. Members of the LGBTQ community also criticized him for anti-gay preaching. In December, Will Rodriguez-Kennedy, immediate past president of the LGBT organization San Diego Democrats for Equality, said the Legacy International Center should not overlook that part of Cerullo’s past. “This is a legacy project to honor Dr. Cerullo’s history, and that history is tainted by the fact that his ministry has promoted gay conversion therapy, which is illegal in California and is dangerous and harmful,” Rodriguez-Kennedy said. “It will be up to the owners and operators of this complex to demonstrate that they are inclusive of the LGBT community, and if they demonstrate that, I’m sure it will be a welcome addition to the community.” Jim Penner, executive director of the Legacy Center Foundation at Morris Cerullo World Evangalism, said on Monday that it meant the world to Cerullo that he lived long enough to see the Legacy International Center open to the public. “It was definitely a dream fulfilled,” Penner said. “He was extremely excited to see Legacy completed and people enjoying it.” Despite Cerullo’s advanced age, Penner said he remained “active every hour of every day” in the ministry, which employs about 100 people at its offices in San Diego, London, Holland and Canada. In the aftermath of his death, Cerullo’s wife of 69 years, Theresa Cerullo, has taken on a leadership role in the ministry, which Penner said was organized many years ago to survive its founder by training ministers worldwide. “So it’s multiple people in multiple nations carrying that mantle forward, not just one person sitting in San Diego,” he said. Penner said Cerullo behind the scenes was very much the friendly, affectionate man known to television viewers worldwide. “He smiled easily and he loved easily and he absolutely loved people,” Penner said. “It didn’t matter what your station in life or nationality, if he met you, he fell in love with you very quickly.” Born in Passaic, N.J., Cerullo was orphaned at age 2, and he and his four siblings were placed at the Daughters of Miriam Jewish orphanage in Clifton, N.J. He lived there until age 15 and at some point found his Christian faith. At age 17, he received a scholarship to a Bible college in New York and by 23 he was running his first outreach crusade in Greece. His profile expanded globally through his television program “Victory Today,” and he wrote more than 200 books and devotionals, according to an obituary published on his website. Much of Cerullo’s work was spent building schools of ministry around the world. He also was involved in global humanitarian work. According to his ministry, he built multiple orphanages in Mexico and provided aid in Ethiopia. With his wife and partners Tommy and Matthew Barnett he built a floor of the Los Angeles Dream Center for housing up to 200 homeless individuals. In 2011, Cerullo purchased 18 acres along Interstate 8 in Mission Valley for the Legacy International Center. Financed entirely with donations from the faithful and the sales of ministries overseas, the resort features a two-story headquarters building; a five-story, 126-room hotel and spa; a 4-D motion seat dome theater that plays religious films; biblical-style catacombs; art galleries; illuminated fountains; a re-creation of the Western Wall in Jerusalem; an interactive globe structure; and a marketplace of international shops. Cerullo is survived by his wife, Theresa, their son, David, and daughter-in-law, Barbara; and daughter, Susan Peterson; seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Penner said memorial services have not been announced and would likely be impacted by social-distancing orders. - The San Diego Union - Tribune, July 13, 2020 Photo of Mark Cerullo Mark Cerullo
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Desiree S. Anzalone, age 31 of Stratford passed Sunday, September 27, 2020 at Smilow Cancer Hospital. Born in Norwalk on September 15, 1989 she was the daughter of Mario Anzalone of Stratford and Julia Arnaz of Milford. Desiree was an old soul who loved 60’s & 70’s music. Her talent was prolific including her art, song writing, poetry & playing piano. She was a talented photographer & enjoyed playing guitar with her father, singing & modeling photography. Desiree was a lover of animals & people but most of all she loved life. She will be missed deeply by all but will live forever in our hearts. In addition to her father Mario and his wife Nancy and her mother Julia Arnaz and her husband Halbert Massey, she is survived by her maternal grandmother, Susan Callahan Howe, maternal grandfather, Desi Arnaz Jr., paternal grandmother, Carol Anzalone and paternal great-grandmother, Marjorie Broadhurst and her fiancé and caregiver, Chris Reynolds. She is also survived by her step brothers; Sammy and Joe, AJ and Nick as well as her uncle, John and aunts; Melissa, Janine & Sherry. She was predeceased by her beloved grandfather Mario Anzalone, Sr., and her great-grandparents Desi Arnaz Sr. and Lucille Ball. Friends may greet the family on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020 from 11:00 am to 2:30 pm at the Dennis & D’Arcy – Abriola & Kelemen Funeral Home, 2611 Main Street Stratford. Please follow pandemic guidelines by wearing a face mask, keep social distance and avoid lingering after paying your respects to the family. Photo of Susan Callahan-Howe Susan Callahan-Howe
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