Mary Vail

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Mary Vail My email address is lizvail@outlook.com. Will be happy to hear from you
Feb 02 · posted to the photo Robert Russell Greene
Mary Vail Somehow, this sent the message before I was done. To continue, Lyndall's father was Dr. Frank Ellis. He changed his name from Frank Greene in early 1890. His father was Wylie Bridges Greene and his mother was Maggie Greene. Therefore, his brother was Robert Greene. I have copies of parts of Maggie's diary which are so interesting to read...from the time she first became acquainted with Wiley til they married, had children, wandered all over the country, chasing rainbows, to the difficult life she had with no money except the stipend given her by her sons. One excerpt mentions a visit from Frank Ellis and his new wife, Laura. According to my Grandmother's stories, her father was involved in a duel in Kentucky, shot a man and was whisked off to the port of New Orleans by his father who sent him on a sailing ship to South Africa. I also have his ticket for the passage. During the years he was gone, he changed his name and finally came back to the states as Frank Ellis. He went to medical school and became a doctor. He was hired by the Department of Indian Affairs to attend to the needs of the Indians on various reservations throughout the Midwest and West. His last assignment was in Arizona. My Grandmother remembers the trip down the Colorado River on a raft or canoe when they moved there. She was six years old at the time, 1906. My Mother was his first grandchild and she loved him beyond all else. They all lived together in Kansas City MO where my mother and her brother were born. Unfortunately, in the early 1930's, Frank died from a heart attack one night. Equally unfortunate, my grandfather, Vincent Maddux, was shot in the head by a robber at the bus terminal where he worked. While he didn't die from his injuries, he was disabled thereafter. The Old Soldier's Home in Kansas City had to ask they to vacate the doctor's residence after Frank died. So, the family lost both bread winners and their home. With the small amount of money they had between them, Laura, Lyndall, Vince and the two kids moved here to California. They purchased a lovely old Craftsman house in Monterey Park in 1936. They lived there until the late 1960's when they sold it to move into a smaller house in the same city. Grandpa Vince died in 1973 and Lyndall in 1989. My mother, Betty, died in 2011 and her brother, Bill, in 2012. If you are interested in any of the pictures of the family, including Maggie, Frank, Laura, etc. and pictures of the Greene Jewelry store from, what appears to be, around 1910, I'll be very happy to share what I have with you. These may all be things you already have, but you might want to check them out. Some of the pictures I have made an educated guess at who they are based on what I know, uniforms and clothing. I'm fairly confident it is largely correct but would love to have other eyes looking at the stuff. I have a considerable number of letters between Frank and his children as well as a controversy he and the other doctors working for Indian Affairs had with the government. Also, there is a museum in Arizona who has the contract signed by Frank for his service in Arizona along with some pictures of him and his family on the desolate reservation.
Feb 02 · posted to the photo Robert Russell Greene
Mary Vail I'm very excited to hear from you. It has been frustrating trying to find info on this branch of the family. My understanding is that during and after the Civil War, many records were destroyed or lost to posterity. A little of the history as I know it: My grandmother was Lyndall Ellis (Greene) Maddux. She was born to Dr. Frank Ellis and Laura Dickson Ellis in 1900 in the Oklahoma Territory. She married Vincent Maddux in 1923.
Feb 02 · posted to the photo Robert Russell Greene
Mary Vail Amazing how times have changed! I'll post some pics of the buses he drove. Just so you know, I received a message on the website from a distant 'cousin' because of pictures I posted of Dr. Frank Ellis. I am waiting for a reply from her, but haven't heard back yet. This is the first time I've received any info from a related person and am looking forward to sharing info with her. She may have info that I am missing on his family and I may have some she doesn't have. I was very happy to hear from her. Thanks for the website.
Jul 18, 2013 · posted to the photo Kansas City Bus Drivers, ca 1929
Mary Vail Thanks for the opinion. I have corrected the date on the original photo submitted. The catcher in the pic is Howard Van Buskirk, born in 1888. He lived in New Jersey around Plainfield and Point Pleasant. I will check out the Manhattan team and see if it may be a possibility. I am pretty certain that is Babe Ruth in the pic but have no idea who any of the other team members are.
May 27, 2013 · posted to the photo Baseball Team & Babe Ruth, New Jersey
Mary Vail You are right, Daniel. I went back and checked to see what identifiers I might find. Howard Van Buskirk, the catcher in the picture, was born in 1888 so my original date is way off. The album where the picture resides is completely undated with pics from the late 1800's through about 1920-25. I've looked up some of the swimwear in pictures and have dated some to around 1900. Since they lived on the coast in New Jersey, I can only assume most were taken in New Jersey.
May 27, 2013 · posted to the photo Baseball Team & Babe Ruth, New Jersey
Mary Vail That is so awesome. It always amazes me how people can be interested in other families history. I just love all the stories, whether or not they are relatives. It comes clear why we, as americans, are such tough people. We live in luxury compared to the rest of the world, but underneath we are pretty tough and all the 'ancient faces' are responsible for that.
Apr 25, 2013 · posted to the person Frank G. Ellis
Mary Vail Isnt that the truth, though. Later, I'll post excerpts from his mother's diary. Those men made her life a living hell!!
Apr 25, 2013 · posted to the person Frank G. Ellis
Mary Vail That is so nice of you to say! I will get busy and post those pictures. If I do them all at once, there will be a cronology to it. He is a fun character to poke at! I have to say, he did a huge amount of good for the Native Americans in his care, though. It really makes up for some of his other shenanigans. The tribes grieved his passing since he was so good to them. The Leavenworth Old Soldier's Home was built on what was an Indian camp site. The government, in its infinite wisdom and mercy, allowed the Indians to camp nearby in the summer. Frank held clinics (of sorts) to treat the eye diseases of the Indians and saved many from being blind. The Indians were very, very grateful. I read an article my grandmother had that detailed his efforts with the Indians at Leavenworth. It was a posthumous account of his work. The newspaper was from that area of Kansas and was for the reservation Indians. Maybe one day I'll find it but the original article wasn't in the papers left from my Grandmother so I assume someone else in the family was interested and took it. One day I may make the trip to Kansas to see what I find there. Again, thank you for your kind words. As I said, this is what makes geneology work worthwhile. Most of it is simple dates - birth, marriage, death and the names of the children of the union. Pretty dry stuff. But, once in awhile a true gem surfaces and it keeps us going!
Apr 25, 2013 · posted to the person Frank G. Ellis
Mary Vail Well, it seems my illustrious great-grandfather was involved in a duel in Kentucky sometime around 1885 or 86. He 'won' the duel, however, duels had been outlawed in Kentucky by that time, so he now was a fugitive. His father, Dr. Wiley Bridges Greene, spirited him away to New Orleans, bought a ticket for him to South Africa, changed his name and sent him away. In his mother's diary, there are no entries for the year this happened. The next time he is mentioned is several years later and was thereafter referred to Frank or F Ellis, or FE instead of James or Jimmy. He was certainly a colorful person, prone to fits of ranting and raving about the 'damned Democrats' and the buracracy at the Bureau of Indian Affairs. I have a letter from Teddy Roosevelt in response to one of Frank's letters concerning the deplorable conditions on the Reservations. Needless to say, Teddy wasn't particularly interested in the Indians and sent a polite "thank you for your concern" type letter. Just because he was an interesting character, you might want to look at a posting on the website of the Sharlot Hall Museum in Arizona. An article "Looking back at Dr. Frank Ellis and the Colorado River Agency" gives some details about the assignment to the Colorado River Agency at Parker Arizona. My grandmother, his daughter, was six when they made the trip from Missouri to Arizona. This involved taking the train to wherever it ended, boarding a stage coach to the end of the line and then going down the mighty Colorado River in a canoe or raft to the reservation. My grandmother remembers having to sit under a blanket for the trip down the river because the "Indians" who guided the raft/canoe were not properly dressed. This became home for their family for the next several years. My grandmother attended the Indian school on the reservation. My great grandmother finally had enough of living on the reservations and told him to find some other means of support. After Parker, he was hired as one of the surgeons at the Old Soldier's Home in Leavenworth KS. Of course, many things happened in the meantime, but that is where he eventually died in 1932. We've always enjoyed the stories of him because he was such a scoundrel in many ways. I am only sorry I never got to meet him and only know him because of the stories from my grandmother and mother. They both idolized him. My great-grandmother was a little more realistic, and, while she loved him she wasn't blind to his faults. He also served several stints in the Army, the latest was WWI. I've always enjoyed the pictures of him because his pomposity shines through. I'll post some additional pictures of him in the next few days. He had his picture taken at every opportunity, had numerous prints made and was always posing in some perfectly ridiculous way. Just makes me smile! Thank you for your interest in the old scoundrel. He is one of the people that makes geneology interesting!
Apr 24, 2013 · posted to the person Frank G. Ellis