Sue Real

AncientFaces Member since Dec 17, 2003

Sue's Photos

This photo, ca 1830 - 1926, was found in the possessions of Louvinnie Neal, wife to Benjamin K. Ralph Kite, daughter to James Edward Neal, sister to John W....
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This photo, ca 1830 - 1926, was found in the possessions of Louvinnie Neal, wife to Benjamin K. Ralph Kite, daughter to James Edward Neal, sister to John W....
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This photo, CA 1830 - 1926, was found in the possessions of Louvinnie Neal, wife to Benjamin K. Ralph kite, daughter to James Edward Neal, sister to John W....
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This photo, ca 1830 - 1926, was found in the possessions of Louvinnie Neal, wife to Benjamin K. Ralph Kite, daughter to James Edward Neal, sister to John W....
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This photo, ca 1830 - 1926, was found in the possessions of Louvinnie Neal, wife to Benjamin K. Ralph Kite, daughter to James Edward Neal, sister to John W....
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Sue's Discussion Posts

Sue Real Before me John Carr Parish Judge of the Parish of Natchitoches, in the State of Louisiana, and Notary Public en official, and in presence of Charles Pavis (?) and ___ Debbeur (?) competent witnesses, residing in the aforesaid Parish personally appeared, John Crow, and James Crow, major heirs of Isaac Crow, and Margaret his wife, formaly of said Parish deceased, who declared that for in and in consideration of the sum of five hundred dollars to them in hand well and truly paid at and before the signing and execution hereof, the recipt whereof they do hereby severally acknowledge they had, severally, sold, asigned, transformed, set over and delivered, and that by these presents they do severally, sell asign, transfer, convey, set over and deliver unto Hugh McGuffin of the said Parish his heirs and asigns forever all heir the said James Crow and John Crow's right, title, interest, claim and pretention, as coheirs as aforesaid, in and unto a certain tract of land situate and being on the Sabine River in the said Parish, on which is the Ferry known by the name of Crow's Ferry across the said River, containing in the whole tract one league square, and which was conceded to their father, as the said vendors believe under the name of Michell Crow. In Testimony whereof the said John Crow and James Crow each declaring he did not know how to write have each set his ordinary mark of a cross, and the said Hugh McGuffin here present and accepting, hath hereto signed his name, in presence of and with us said Judge and Notary Public, of witnesses, at Natchitoches, this second day of November in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight hundred and twenty seven. (Signed) John Crow X his mark= James Crow X his mark= Hugh McGuffin= Attest+ C. Pavis (?)= W.F. Debbise(?)= John C. Carr Parish Judge of the Parish of Natchitoches and Notary Public en official. Original spelling, punctuation and grammer. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 06, 2004 · posted to the surname Mcguffin
Sue Real Hugh M. McGuffin, born ca 1780, owned six hundred acres. He had owned grant # 83 in Bayou Pedro on the Sabine River in Sabine Parish Rio Hondo Louisiana. It was here at the home of Hugh McGuffin, that in 1821 Moses Austin spent several weeks recuperating after his strenuous trip to Texas. In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase occurred inclusive of 544 million acres of land. The land had been purchased from France and in 1804 this land was divided into the Louisiana Territory and the Territory of Orleans. The Orleans Territory was divided into 12 counties named as, Acadia, Attakapas, Concordia, German Coast, Iberville, LaFourche, Natchitoches, Opelousas, Orleans, Ouchita, Pointe Coupee and Rapides. In 1807 the term “Counties” was replaced with the term “Parish”. But the boundary between the French and the “Spanish Mexican Empire” had not been fixed and at the time of the Louisiana Purchase, Spain claimed all of Texas and a strip of land in Louisiana. It's boundaries included land between the Sabine River and the Arroyo Hondo, a tributary of the Red River, seven miles west of Natchitoches. This extended North along the Red River and South to the Gulf of Mexico. This was known as The Neutral Strip. About all of the Neutral Strip was divided by Spanish grants, some legal, some illegal. A large number of early settlers in Sabine Parish settled on these grants which are known as the Rio Hondo lands. All claimants received 640 acres unless stated. This particular tract of land, grant #83, owned by Hugh McGuffin was seized for non-payment of taxes and sold at public auction by Sheriff K.L. McLemore to William B. Stilles for $10.00 in the year 1837. Hugh McGuffin was married first to Jane (Jennie) Ford of Tennessee and then to Delphia Earle. Hugh McGuffin was Chief Justice of Montgomery from ____ to 1840; Justice of the Peace pct #11 1840 to 1845; Commissioner 1845 to 1846 when he was removed from office. He was Justice of the Peace of Montgomery County Texas when his son, John Ford W. McGuffin, married Sarah (Sally) Montgomery on June 6,1838. Hugh McGuffin died in 1861. Note on Rio Hondo Grant #'s: 62 Guillaume Bebe @ Bayou See 64 John Freeman @ Bayou St. Jean 69 John Montgomery, Jr. @ Bayou Kisatchie 78 James M. Gibson assignee of J. Montgomery @ McKimm's Creek 83 Hugh McGuffin @ Bayou Pedro 210 Joseph T. Montgomery assignee of William Denton @ Bayou Negriete 267 Michel Neil @ River Quebqueshue Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 06, 2004 · posted to the surname Mcguffin
Sue Real Richard (Dick) Real was the son Edward real and Sarah Portman. Richard was born Nov 10,1813 in North Carolina and died after 1887 in Montgomery County, Texas. He purchased numerous tracts of land in 1841 in Chickasaw County and Columbus County, MS. He was a wild-catter in the oilfields and bought and sold land with his son Jesse Malachi Real # 1 in Texas and also bought and donated land for the Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Keechi, TX. He married Lucrecia Lewis on Sep 1,1836 in Winston County, MS. She was born in 1815. Marriage Record Book #1, pg. 33; Bondsman Thomas Jones. Married by Benjamin Prestidge. Attachment to application: Lucrecia Lewis is the daughter of E. Lewis. Richard Real, his wife Lucrecia Lewis, four of their seven children; Jesse Malachi # 1, b. 1847, Edward (Ed) b. 1852, Thomas b.1853, Missouri America b.1854 and Richard's 71 year old father Edward Real came to Texas on a wagon train ca 1861 and settled in Keechi, Leon County, Texas. Richard and Lucrecia Real's son Thomas died of “the fever” on the trip to Texas. When and where is unknown. Richard and Lucrecia other daughters; Sarah b.1837 and Margaret b.1839 Real married brothers Mike and Sam Austin and stayed in Mississippi. Nancy Josephine b. 1841 married and moved to Ohio. The Real's were independent types who usually moved on to the next frontier as soon as civilization came too close. Below is a transcribed copy of a letter Richard wrote to his brother Henry back in Alabama. It was sent to me by Frazier Real. Parts of the letter was missing. The words in parenthesis is my interpretation of what may have been said. Keechi Leon Co., Texas March 2nd 1879 Dear Brother I wrote to you sometime ago but have not received any answer from you yet and I thought I would write again as I could not imagine what was the reason you did not write. I have been looking for you to come to this country all the winter but as you have not got here yet I guess that you will not come soon but I would like for you to come as soon as you can. Jessey is doing well he lives about 5 miles from me. Ed is living near me about ½ mile. They are both on places of their own they are both well. Ed is not married yet. Henry I fear that you have forgotten me and the pleasure that we have had together please write to me and tell all about how you are getting along and all about the Estate to what they are doing with it try to keep me posted as well as you can give me the Administraters name and address in full {I} {seem to have} forgotten it if the money is dollars {please write to} me and I will get you to receive my {share and you can} come to this country and bring {my share to} me. I have nothing of interest {to write.} Close for this time write news to your brother. Richard Real Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 02, 2004 · posted to the surname Real
Sue Real Jane was born in Ireland in 1811. She was Scotch-Irish. She was considered the Matriarch of the families. She was first married to Joseph Neal until he was killed in a hold-up trying to protect his family and property from outlaws. Joseph had been married before and had five children, Joe born about 1825, Jesse born about 1826, William (Willis) Benjamin born about 1829, Thomas Franklin born about 1831 and George Washington Neal born about 1833. Jane McGuffin and Joseph Neal were married Nov 13, 1845. Witnesses were: S.A. Eason and A. Nabours. According to their court recorded marriage papers (Many, Sabine Parish, LA. Deed Book A pg 258 filed 13/11/1845) on this Nov.13,1845 they wished to officially celebrate their marriage by Judge W.R.D. Speight and they acknowledged Menerva Evalina Neal and William Neal as their children. Jane was pregnant with their third child Susan Frances Neal, born June 18, 1846, when Joseph was murdered on December 9, 1845. December 12,1845, Jane McGuffin Neal had to petition the courts for permission to keep and raise her own children and Joseph's from a previous marriage. December 12, 1845 an inventory was ordered of all properties, land and personal. Lists were also made of all personal properties. Some of which are listed below: 31 head of cattle = $ 170.50.......... 1 Roane mare = 30.00.......... 1 gray colt = 10.00.......... 6 head of sheep = 9.00.......... 1 Sorrell mare = 55.00......... 1 brown mare mule = 40.00.......... 35 hogs = 61.00.......... 4 goats = 7.00.......... 100 bushels of corn = 100.00.......... 300 lbs of fodder = 3.00.......... 1 wagon & 2 chains = 50.00.......... 2 yokes of oxen = 60.00.......... 800 lbs of fodder = 4.00.......... 10 acres of land = 20.00.......... 20 acres of land = $ 40.00.......... Home plantation of 25 acres = 100 ...... .... 3 pairs if geers & 3 plows = 10.00...... .... 3000 bales of cotton = 37.50.......... 100 bushels of sweet potatoes = 25.00.......... Household furnishings and cooking utensils = 140.00.......... 3 guns = 18.00.......... 2 saddles = 3.00.......... 600 planks = 9.00.......... Total $ 1012.20. On January 12, 1846 the courts held what they called a “family meeting”. Notifications were sent out by Sabine Parish Judge W.R.D. Speight (husband of Amanda McGuffin) The “family meeting” was composed of, Alexander Biles, John Ford, Patrick Dillon, William Phillips and Samuel J. McCurdy. It is unknown at this time how Amanda McGuffin (Speight Lightfoot) was related to Jane McGuffin. Others mentioned in the “family meeting” succession papers were the local justices, or prominent citizens which consisted of, Judge William R.D. Speight, William E. Phillips, appraiser Samuel McCurdy, William Herring, Patrick Dillon, S.A. Eason, John Ford, Francis Marion Eldridge (husband of Susan Frances McGuffin) deed recorder John Baldwin, Thomas Hargrove, James Gray, A. Nabors (Nabours, Neighbors) appraiser A. Burke and Jane's court appointed attorney A. Biles. Jane McGuffin and Joseph Neal could neither read nor write. According to the succession papers there were no female family members notified to attend the “family meeting”. These were the ones that would tell Jane McGuffin Neal what she could or could not do with her and Joseph's property. They told her that it would be “advantageous for, and in the best interest of", her and the children to sell all properties. The property was then used for the few outstanding debts. Some of the property went to the people that advised her to sell; A. Nabors, S.A. Eason, John Herring and John Baldwin among others. Jane sold the commissary (store) that she and Joseph had owned in Many, Sabine Parish, Louisiana. The earliest record I have of Joseph owning the commissary is 1843. He was also listed in the 1840 Natchitoches Parish, (Sabine Parish, Many, was established in 1843) Louisiana census. Joseph never changed his location. The parish (county) lines changed. After Jane and Joseph were married they ran the store together. The very same store he was killed in on December 9, 1845. Joseph and Jane had sold off the other properties before he died. It is important to note that when searching through the old Deed and Platt records at the Many, Sabine Parish, Louisiana Courthouse there were many Deed and Platt records were missing. I was told by both, the tax office clerk and the county clerk's office that many of the deeds and Platt records had been stolen in the 1800's. Jane McGuffin Neal Recknor was a hard working, fun loving and well liked woman. Quote from Jane McGuffin Neal Recknor: “Bury me in a Mulberry coffin so I can go through hell a poppin”. (Mulberries pop when thrown into a fire) She lived to be almost 100 years of age. (Quote from Leon Co. TX. Historical Archives) Note: Joseph Neal had eight living children. Note: Jane McGuffin Neal Recknor had eleven living children including step-children. Note: Jane McGuffin Neal Recknor had a brother named John Hugh McGuffin. Note: Spelling and grammar is original. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 01, 2004 · posted to the surname Mcguffin
Sue Real As told to Sue Mullins by Cecil Verlon Brown:..... "Verlon" was the son of Susan (Susie Bell) Real Brown Perry and grandson of Jesse Malachi Real # 2. Verlon served on the front lines in Korea with the Navy and the US Army in World War II. In the Army his job was dozer operator. Part of his job on the front lines was digging mass graves for the dead soldiers. He had to dig the deep holes then using the dozer blade, had to push all the dead soldiers into the big holes which served as mass burial sites. There was so much shooting and shelling going on that in most cases the soldiers were not allowed to individually place each body into the holes. One time when Verlon came home to Montgomery County, Texas on leave he went to see his Uncle Allen Zachariah (A.Z.) Real who owned a sawmill. Well I guess that Verlon was enjoying his leave so much that he just plum forgot what day it was because one day while out at the mill he looked up and saw two MP's heading toward him. Verlon took off running around the blade cutting area with the MP's chasing and trying to corner him. All of a sudden he stopped at the big saw blade and stuck both his hands to the huge sawmill blade and cut off all his fingers. (Someone had told him that if he could not fire a gun that the Army would discharge him) As soon as he was well enough the Army placed a rifle in his hands. The nubs that were left on his hands were long enough (one joint) to reach the trigger on the rifle so they sent him once again back to the front lines as a dozer operator. Every few months Verlon got into just enough trouble to stay in the brig so he would not have to go back to the dozer. The Army refused his mental disability discharge and instead gave him a dishonorable discharge and sent him home. After he was discharged from the Army he came home severely depressed and would sit and cry for days and weeks at a time. It took awhile but soon he started to pull out of his depression (or cover it). He became the best prankster anyone could ever want to meet. He was always laughing, always trying to cheer people up, always had a joke to tell. He was one of the best, and most respected men I have ever known. Now looking back on it, the best prank he ever pulled was….. One time when he and my mother (Daisy Lee Real) were outside and everyone else was busy on the other side of the house he told my mother that he wanted to take her picture on a gentle old milk cow. My mother at that time was a city gal and her trouble was that she could not tell a gentle old milk cow from a bucking long horn bull. She figured that if the old milk cow was just standing there then it must be O'K and that everyone must ride this old cow. He put her on the bull, it started to buck, she started to scream, Verlon fell on the ground laughing and she flew off. Everyone came running to see what the screaming was all about. They had to pull her off Verlon. After that, every time someone saw her that had heard about her “famous ride” they would moo-o-o her. Verlon died of a heart attack in 1991. He is buried in Pilgreen Cemetery, Montgomery County, Texas. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 01, 2004 · posted to the surname Real
Sue Real John Luther lived in Montgomery County, Texas. He was the son of Jesse Malachi Real # 1 and Susan Frances Neal. Uncle Johnnie was born in Keechi, Leon County, TX. on Nov 30, 1878, and died in New Caney, Montgomery, TX. on March 29, 1959. His wife was Lottie Elezzbbech Wiggins, born Nov 30,1888 and died Feb 12,1919. John and Lottie are buried side by side in Dry Creek Cemetery, Montgomery County, TX. Uncle Johnnie was so well liked that not only family but others as well called him "Uncle Johnnie". While living in a little sawmill town of Waukegan, Montgomery County, Texas, he was the assistant manager of the sawmill commissary. He owned the first and maybe the only taxi service in Waukegan. Before anyone else owned a car John Luther had the first one in town. He hired a man to run a jitney service (a taxi that charges 5 cents) with his car from Waukegan to Conroe. Before long he had to buy another car because some people were demanding to ride in style into Conroe to shop and didn't want to ride the train. Quote from Joyce Blackmon, John's grand daughter: Mother used to tell me about going to town with Papa, and his habit of thinking the car would follow the road just like his horse. She said they spent a lot of time getting the car out of the woods or the ditch because he just couldn't steer it. One time, after they finally got to town, Mother was lying on the back seat, and the car salesman came up to Uncle Johnnie and told him about a new car called a "roadster" and that he really should get one. Mother, being sick and tired of hauling the car out of roadside thickets and such, raised up and said, "Papa, let's get one of those roadsters; I'm so tired of this woodster." Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Feb 01, 2004 · posted to the surname Real
Sue Real Samuel McGuffin and William McGuffin owned land in Cincinnati, Walker County, Texas. One hundred and fifty years ago, Cincinnati, Texas was a bustling port on the west bank of the Trinity River. George Hunter was the proprietor of the stagecoach inn and tavern in the town. This is an account of the unusual demise of Mr. Hunter, as told by his descendant, Joseph M Smith. “George Hunter died in 1853. His habit was to go to Galveston with some of the riverboat people and buy commodities to sell through his businesses there in Cincinnati. In the spring of 1853, he went to Galveston in a boat called the Fanner. They got to Galveston and would stay for several days. While they were there, the captain came to George and said, 'George, I've got a delivery to make up to Houston; …come go with me.' So, George went with him. Well, coming back into the harbor at Galveston, as he described it, the Fanner got into a race with another old riverboat and they got the darn boiler so hot, the thing blew up. It killed the captain outright; it scalded George Hunter. Thinking that he might die, George asked another riverboat captain to see that he was buried in Cincinnati. George Hunter lived three days after the explosion, and passed away. Well, they started back up river on this other boat. In those days, there was no such thing as embalming... There were other passengers on the boat and the odor got serious with those other passengers. They begged the captain to pull over to the bank and bury this man…But the captain told 'em if one body on that boat got to Cincinnati, it was gonna be George Hunter… Well, they had a whiskey salesman on the boat and they got a keg of whiskey and they tightened the box air tight and poured in this keg of whiskey. And that saved the day for them.” Cincinnati, on the Trinity River in northern Walker County, was a river port and an important ferry crossing during much of the nineteenth century. The settlement was founded in 1837 by James C. DeWitt and surveyed in 468 lots by Charles Brookfield. Water Street, on the west side, was a segment of the main road between Huntsville and Crockett and the site of the ferry crossing. The waterfront lots were all sold in 1836, but the town developed slowly during its first five years. Although there is no doubt that cotton was shipped from Cincinnati to Galveston on the Trinity, the volume handled is unclear. Records indicate numerous steamboats, as well as keelboats and flatboats, plying the Trinity between Galveston and points north. Although these boats stopped to load cotton or deliver goods at numerous points on the river, often at individual plantations or farms, towns such as Cincinnati frequently developed as central collection points. But navigation on the Trinity was difficult because of sandbars and fluctuations in water level, which often stranded boats for months; repeated attempts to improve the situation failed. Cincinnati probably reached its peak in the early 1850s, when the town had a saloon, a grocery store, a cotton warehouse, a dry-goods store, a saddlery, a tannery, a cotton gin, a blacksmith shop, a wagon maker, a stonemason, and two doctors. Estimates of the population during the early 1850s ranged from 200 to 600. A post office was established in 1866. The major cause of the demise of Cincinnati occurred in 1853, when a traveler from Galveston brought yellow fever to the town. Perhaps as many as 250 people died, although the record is not clear. Rumors were wild and horrifying, but there are only a few specifically identified instances of yellow fever as the cause of death. No doubt a far greater number of people fled to escape the pestilence, and many never returned. The town began a steady decline. In 1872 the railroad connecting Houston and Dallas crossed the Trinity River fifteen miles downstream from Cincinnati, at Riverside. Ten years later the population of Cincinnati had decreased to thirty-five. In 1892 the post office closed. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835
Jan 31, 2004 · posted to the surname Mcguffin
Sue Real William Montgomery and Mary “Polly” had other children, one of whom was Andrew Jackson Montgomery. Andrew was born April 4,1801 on a farm adjoining Elizabeth Paxton Houston, mother of President and General Sam Houston on Baker's Creek a few miles south of Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee. Andrew preceeded his family to Texas in 1819 and had established an Indian Trading Post near present day Montgomery Texas. William Montgomery was born in Lancaster County South Carolina in 1772, raised in Mecklenberg County North Carolina and died in 1836. William came to Texas in 1822 when Texas still belonged to Mexico. He settled his family on the Red River at Pecan Point where his wife, Polly was killed by the Indians. Mary “Polly” James Montgomery was the daughter of Jesse James and an aunt of the outlaw brothers Frank and Jesse James. William and Polly's children were; Edley Montgomery; John Montgomery; Elizabeth Montgomery; Anna Montgomery; Mary Montgomery; and Sarah Montgomery McGuffin (wife of John Ford W. McGuffin). Note: John McGuffin was Montgomery County Coroner 1841-1843. Sheriff 1852 -1854. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Jan 31, 2004 · posted to the surname Montgomery
Sue Real True to her word, in the year about 1865, Susan was 19 years old and Jesse was 18 years old, Susan Frances Neal married Jesse Malachi Real. They had six living children, Marion Francis, Josephine Evaline, Susan Frances, John Luther, Emma Ann and Jesse Malachi Real, # 2. They lived in Keechi, Leon County, Texas where their family grew up. They lived on a farm. Susan cooked on a fire in the fireplace. Their house had a mud roof and a dirt floor. In a few months they bought a cook stove and also a sewing machine. They were the first family to own a sewing machine in that part of the country. Susan had a spinning wheel she spun thread on to knit socks and stockings. She wove the thread into cloth for making clothes. The thread was made from the cotton they raised. Her work seemed to never end. Her days were long and hard. It was not uncommon for her to still be working after her family was asleep in bed. Her duties, as was all the frontier women, was to have children to work the land. She also produced the family's food and clothing. She planted, plowed, harvested and cooked the food for her family. She planted, raised, picked, cleaned the cotton and spun it into thread to make the cloth to sew the clothes to clothe her family. She pressed the cottonseed to make cooking oil, margarine and soap. After the oil was removed she ground the seed to make seed meal to feed the cows, horses and sheep. She had to be teacher and nurse for her children, her husband and often for the children of neighboring families when the men and other women shared the work of the homestead. The family raised all their food and had fruit trees. They preserved fruit and put it in large churns and crocks. It would keep for months without spoiling. Susan Frances Neal Real was said to have started labor pains while plowing in the field. She walked back to the house, had her baby, (Jesse Malachi Real, # 2) washed up, took her baby and went back to the field to finish her plowing. Jesse Malachi Real, # 1, was a man of many talents. He and his son Jesse, # 2 were considered to be the best fiddlers in the family. His life and adventures included being an expert horseman, a pony express rider, and a farmer. He also owned numerous sawmills, J.M. Real Lumber Company, with his son Jesse Malachi Real # 2. With his father Richard, he was a wildcatter in the oilfields of East Texas. He was a deeply religious Baptist man. And from what I've been told he was a faithful loving husband and father. Maybe that's why Susan was so willing to pack up and follow him anywhere. Edward Real, Richard Real and Jesse Malachi Real # 1 bought and donated land to build and helped to build the first church in Keechi, Leon County, Texas. It was the Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Keechi. They along with Jesse's wife Susan Frances Neal Real and David Recknor were original charter members of the church. Soon Jesse Malachi Real, # 1 and Susan Frances Neal Real decided to move their family, including his parents, Richard and Lucrecia, from Leon County Texas. In about 1881 they loaded all their worldly possessions, sewing machine and cook stove, into their covered wagon, tied the milk cow to the back of the wagon and set out on the trail again. There was still a lot of country to be seen. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2004 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Jan 31, 2004 · posted to the surname Real
Sue Real Jesse Malachi Real # 2 was the sort of person that would give you the shirt off his back if you needed it. His favorite thing to do was ride his horse, “Old Dan 2nd ”, and play his fiddle. His favorite snack was bowls of fresh churned butter. I remember many days when I was about three years old that he and I would sit on the door steps and he would share his butter with me. He would sneak the butter out of the house when he thought Grandma and Mama weren't watching, but sometimes I would see them sneak up to the door checking on us. The sawmill / oilfield town of Wigginsville, Texas was a town of heartache and heart- break for the Real family. Just a couple of years earlier (Dec.17,1948), Allen Zachariah (A.Z.) {Jesse Malachi's son} and Daisy Real's twenty month old daughter Barbara Allen had died. The date was Wednesday, January 11, 1950. It was a cold stormy night. Grandpa Jesse was worried because “Old Dan 2nd” was throwing a fit. The lightning was streaking across the sky and the thunder was booming. Old Dan sounded as if the devil himself were after him. He was rearing up, stomping the ground and trying to kick his corral down. This went on for a few minutes then he would quiet down. Grandpa Jesse looked out the windows and the door but could see nothing wrong outside. Even though it wasn't like Old Dan, Grandpa figured he was just upset about the storm. Finally Grandpa decided he had to go outside to try to soothe his horse. Old Dan was his baby. He had raised him from a colt. Old Dan would make noises like he was begging every time Grandpa left the house and he couldn't go with him. Daddy told Grandpa not to go outside in the bad storm because there was nothing wrong with the horse except he was spoiled and probably just wanted to come into the house with Grandpa. They laughed about the joke as Grandpa walked out the door. When Grandpa did not immediately come back into the house, Daddy told Mama that Grandpa was probably telling that old horse a bedtime story. Grandpa had been outside for awhile when Old Dan started having another fit. Daddy knew something must be wrong and ran out the door toward the corral. He found Grandpa Jesse lying dead on the ground outside the corral, his head in a pool of blood, with a hammer laying beside his body. It is told in the family that Jesse had information about a murder and that was why he was killed. His death was ruled a stroke. Source: The Real Family Album written by Sue Real Mullins. Copyright © 2003 by Sue Real Mullins, P.O.Box 67, Crockett, TX. 75835.
Dec 24, 2003 · posted to the surname Real
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