Andrew Lang (1844 - 1912)

Andrew Lang
1844 - 1912
updated October 30, 2019
Andrew Lang was born on March 31, 1844 in Scotland, United Kingdom. He died on July 20, 1912 in Scotland, United Kingdom at 68 years old.

Andrew Lang
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Andrew Lang
FBA
Andrew Lang.jpg
Born 31 March 1844 Selkirk, Selkirkshire, Scotland
Died 20 July 1912 (aged 68) Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Occupation
Poet, novelist, literary critic and anthropologist.
Alma mater University of St Andrews
Balliol College, Oxford
Period 19th century
Genre Children's literature
Spouse Leonora Blanche Alleyne (m. 1875)
Andrew Lang FBA (31 March 1844 – 20 July 1912) was a Scottish poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang lectures at the University of St Andrews are named after him.
Biography
Lang was born in 1844 in Selkirk, Scottish Borders. He was the eldest of the eight children born to John Lang, the town clerk of Selkirk, and his wife Jane Plenderleath Sellar, who was the daughter of Patrick Sellar, factor to the first Duke of Sutherland. On 17 April 1875, he married Leonora Blanche Alleyne, youngest daughter of C. T. Alleyne of Clifton and Barbados. She was (or should have been) variously credited as author, collaborator, or translator of Lang's Color/Rainbow Fairy Books which he edited.
He was educated at Selkirk Grammar School, Loretto School, and the Edinburgh Academy, as well as the University of St Andrews and Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first class in the final classical schools in 1868, becoming a fellow and subsequently honorary fellow of Merton College. He soon made a reputation as one of the most able and versatile writers of the day as a journalist, poet, critic, and historian. He was a member of the Order of the White Rose, a Neo-Jacobite society which attracted many writers and artists in the 1890s and 1900s. In 1906, he was elected FBA.

He died of angina pectoris on 20 July 1912 at the Tor-na-Coille Hotel in Banchory, survived by his wife. He was buried in the cathedral precincts at St Andrews, where a monument can be visited in the south-east corner of the 19th century section.

"Rumpelstiltskin", from Lang's Fairy Tales
Lang is now chiefly known for his publications on folklore, mythology, and religion. The interest in folklore was from early life; he read John Ferguson McLennan before coming to Oxford, and then was influenced by E. B. Tylor.

The earliest of his publications is Custom and Myth (1884). In Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887) he explained the "irrational" elements of mythology as survivals from more primitive forms. Lang's Making of Religion was heavily influenced by the 18th century idea of the "noble savage": in it, he maintained the existence of high spiritual ideas among so-called "savage" races, drawing parallels with the contemporary interest in occult phenomena in England.His Blue Fairy Book (1889) was a beautifully produced and illustrated edition of fairy tales that has become a classic. This was followed by many other collections of fairy tales, collectively known as Andrew Lang's Fairy Books. In the preface of the Lilac Fairy Book he credits his wife with translating and transcribing most of the stories in the collections. Lang examined the origins of totemism in Social Origins (1903).

Psychical research
Lang was one of the founders of "psychical research" and his other writings on anthropology include The Book of Dreams and Ghosts (1897), Magic and Religion (1901) and The Secret of the Totem (1905). He served as President of the Society for Psychical Research in 1911.

Lang extensively cited nineteenth- and twentieth-century European spiritualism to challenge the idea of his teacher, Tyler, that belief in spirits and animism were inherently irrational. Lang used Tyler's work and his own psychical research in an effort to posit an anthropological critique of materialism.

Classical scholarship
See also: English translations of Homer § Lang
He collaborated with S. H. Butcher in a prose translation (1879) of Homer's Odyssey, and with E. Myers and Walter Leaf in a prose version (1883) of the Iliad, both still noted for their archaic but attractive style. He was a Homeric scholar of conservative views. Other works include Homer and the Study of Greek found in Essays in Little (1891), Homer and the Epic (1893); a prose translation of The Homeric Hymns (1899), with literary and mythological essays in which he draws parallels between Greek myths and other mythologies; Homer and his Age (1906); and "Homer and Anthropology" (1908).

Historian

Andrew Lang at work
Lang's writings on Scottish history are characterised by a scholarly care for detail, a piquant literary style, and a gift for disentangling complicated questions. The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1901) was a consideration of the fresh light thrown on Mary, Queen of Scots, by the Lennox manuscripts in the University Library, Cambridge, approving of her and criticising her accusers.

He also wrote monographs on The Portraits and Jewels of Mary Stuart (1906) and James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902). The somewhat unfavourable view of John Knox presented in his book John Knox and the Reformation (1905) aroused considerable controversy. He gave new information about the continental career of the Young Pretender in Pickle the Spy (1897), an account of Alestair Ruadh MacDonnell, whom he identified with Pickle, a notorious Hanoverian spy. This was followed by The Companions of Pickle (1898) and a monograph on Prince Charles Edward (1900). In 1900 he began a History of Scotland from the Roman Occupation (1900). The Valet's Tragedy (1903), which takes its title from an essay on Dumas's Man in the Iron Mask, collects twelve papers on historical mysteries, and A Monk of Fife (1896) is a fictitious narrative purporting to be written by a young Scot in France in 1429–1431.[

Other writings
Lang's earliest publication was a volume of metrical experiments, The Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), and this was followed at intervals by other volumes of dainty verse, Ballades in Blue China (1880, enlarged edition, 1888), Ballads and Verses Vain (1884), selected by Mr Austin Dobson; Rhymes à la Mode (1884), Grass of Parnassus (1888), Ban and Arrière Ban (1894), New Collected Rhymes (1905).

Lang was active as a journalist in various ways, ranging from sparkling "leaders" for the Daily News to miscellaneous articles for the Morning Post, and for many years he was literary editor of Longman's Magazine; no critic was in more request, whether for occasional articles and introductions to new editions or as editor of dainty reprints.

He edited The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns (1896), and was responsible for the Life and Letters (1897) of JG Lockhart, and The Life, Letters and Diaries (1890) of Sir Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. Lang discussed literary subjects with the same humour and acidity that marked his criticism of fellow folklorists, in Books and Bookmen (1886), Letters to Dead Authors (1886), Letters on Literature (1889), etc.
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Andrew Lang Biography

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Most Commonly Known Name

Andrew Lang

First name

Andrew

Middle name

Unknown.

Last Name(s)

Nickname(s) or aliases

Gender

Male

Birth

Andrew Lang was born on in Scotland, United Kingdom

Death

Andrew Lang died on in Scotland, United Kingdom

Cause of death

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Obituary

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Ethnicity & Lineage

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Nationality & Locations Lived

Unknown.

Religion

Church of England.

Last Known Residence

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Education

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Professions

Wrote Hundreds of Books
These are a list of his FAIRY BOOKS
Andrew Lang's Fairy Books
Lang selected and edited 25 collections of stories that were published annually, beginning with The Blue Fairy Book in 1889 and ending with The Strange Story Book in 1913. They are sometimes called Andrew Lang's Fairy Books although the Blue Fairy Book and other Coloured Fairy Books are only 12 in the series. In this chronological list the Coloured Fairy Books alone are numbered.

(1) The Blue Fairy Book (1889)
(2) The Red Fairy Book (1890)
The Blue Poetry Book (1891)
(3) The Green Fairy Book (1892)
The True Story Book (1893)
(4) The Yellow Fairy Book (1894)
The Red True Story Book (1895)
The Animal Story Book (1896)
(5) The Pink Fairy Book (1897)
The Arabian Nights' Entertainments (1898)
The Red Book of Animal Stories (1899)
(6) The Grey Fairy Book (1900)
(7) The Violet Fairy Book (1901)
The Book of Romance (1902)
(8) The Crimson Fairy Book (1903)
(9) The Brown Fairy Book (1904)
The Red Romance Book (1905)
(10) The Orange Fairy Book (1906)
(11) The Olive Fairy Book (1907)
The Book of Princes and Princesses (1908)
The Red Book of Heroes (1909)
(12) The Lilac Fairy Book (1910)
The All Sorts of Stories Book (1911)
The Book of Saints and Heroes (1912)
The Strange Story Book (1913)

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Andrew Lang Obituary

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Andrew Lang passed away on July 20, 1912 in Scotland, United Kingdom at 68 years old. He was born on March 31, 1844 in Scotland, United Kingdom. We are unaware of information about Andrew's family or relationships.
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1844 - 1912 World Events

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In 1844, in the year that Andrew Lang was born, in June and July, the "Great Flood of 1844" occurred on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers - the largest flood recorded in that area. The population in the area was sparse at the time, though, so the flood didn't have a lot of economic impact. The biggest loss was to the Wyandot Indians - 100 people died from diseases caused by the flood.

In 1858, when he was merely 14 years old, on January 14th, Felice Orsini and others tried - but failed - to assassinate Napoleon III of France. The bombs they set off did kill 8 people - and wounded 142 others. Some of the conspirators were French émigrés who lived in Britain, setting off a short anti-British feeling in France. But the emperor refused to support the sentiment and it died out. Orsini was executed by guillotine on March 13th.

In 1889, by the time he was 45 years old, on March 4th, Benjamin Harrison became the 23rd President of the United States. His grandfather, William Henry Harrison, was the 9th President of the United States. His father, John Scott Harrison - son of William Henry - was in the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1893, Andrew was 49 years old when on February 1st, Thomas Edison's motion picture studio on his laboratory grounds in West Orange New Jersey was completed. The studio was called "Black Maria" and the first movie made and viewed in it was of 3 people pretending to be blacksmiths.

In 1912, in the year of Andrew Lang's passing, Arizona was admitted to the United States in February (on Valentine's Day). It became the 48th state in the Union. Previously a Spanish - then Mexican - territory, the U.S. paid $15 million dollars for the area in 1848. Arizona was the last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the United States.

Other Biographies

Other Langs

Unknown - Unknown
Unknown - Unknown
Unknown - Jan 26, 1964
1838 - Feb 11, 1920
1841 - 1914

Other Bios

Jun 9, 1941 - Unknown
Dec 25, 1976 - Unknown
Jul 18, 1979 - Unknown
Jul 11, 1951 - Unknown
Dec 3, 1953 - Unknown
Aug 15, 1955 - Sep 1, 1955
Aug 10, 1958 - Unknown
May 20, 1960 - Unknown
Oct 28, 1923 - Apr 25, 1993
Sep 13, 1940 - Unknown
Jun 21, 1917 - Feb 23, 2003
Sep 13, 1880 - Jan 13, 1958
Unknown - Oct 25, 2003
Oct 6, 1860 - Apr 23, 1946
Jul 29, 1849 - Aug 2, 1914
Jan 1, 1852 - Jun 12, 1895
around 1855 - May 31, 1924
May 1985 - Unknown
Unknown - Unknown
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