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Amanda S. Stevenson

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Updated: May 17, 2024

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Dabney Coleman
Dabney Coleman of Santa Monica, CA was born on January 3, 1932 at Austin, Texas, and died at age 92 years old on May 16, 2024 at Santa Monica, CA.
OLYMPIAN - 3 MEDALS FOR TRACK & FIELD 1960 Olympics. Ralph Boston Full name Ralph Harold Boston Born May 9, 1939 Laurel, Mississippi, U.S. Died April 30, 2023 (aged 83) Peachtree City, Georgia, U.S. Height 6 ft 1+1⁄2 in (187 cm)[1] Weight 163 lb (74 kg)[1] Sport Track and field Event(s) Sprint, hurdles, long jump, high jump, triple jump, pole vault, Club Southern California Striders, Anaheim Achievements and titles Personal bests 100 yd – 9.6 (1964) 220 yd – 22.0 (1964) 120 ydH – 13.7 (1961) HJ – 2.04 m (1962) PV – 4.16 m (1960) LJ – 8.35 m (1965) TJ – 15.89 m (1964)[1] Medal record Representing the United States Olympic Games Gold medal – first place 1960 Rome Long jump Silver medal – second place 1964 Tokyo Long jump Bronze medal – third place 1968 Mexico City Long jump Pan American Games Gold medal – first place 1963 Sao Paulo Long jump Gold medal – first place 1967 Winnipeg Long jump Ralph Harold Boston (May 9, 1939 – April 30, 2023) was an American track athlete who received three Olympic medals and became the first person to break the 27 feet (8.2 m) barrier in the long jump. Early years and education Boston was born in Laurel, Mississippi. As a student at Tennessee State University, he won the 1960 National Collegiate Athletic Association title in the long jump. In August of the same year, he broke the world record in the event, held by Jesse Owens for 25 years, at the Mt. SAC Relays. Already the world record holder, he improved the mark past 27 feet (8.2 m), jumping 27 feet 0.5 inches (8.242 m) at the Modesto Relays on May 27, 1961.[2] Athletic career Ralph Boston, Lynn Davies, and Igor Ter-Ovanesyan at the 1964 Summer Olympics Boston qualified for the Summer Olympics in Rome, where he won the gold medal in the long jump, setting the Olympic record at 8.12 m (26 ft 7+1⁄2 in), while narrowly defeating American teammate Bo Roberson by a mere centimeter.[1] Boston won the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) national championship in the long jump six times in a row from 1961 to 1966. He also had the longest triple jump for an American in 1963. He returned to the Tokyo Olympics as the world record holder after losing the record to Igor Ter-Ovanesyan, then regaining the record a couple of months before the games, first in Kingston, Jamaica and improving it at the 1964 Olympic Trials. In the Olympic final, Boston exchanged the lead with Ter-Ovanesyan. Going into the fifth round, Boston was leading but fouled while both Lynn Davies and Ter-Ovanesyan jumped past him. On his final jump, he was able to jump past Ter-Ovanesyan, but could not catch Davies and ended winning the silver medal.[1] Boston's final record improvement to 8.35 m was again at the 1965 Modesto Relays. It was tied at altitude by Ter-Ovanesyan in 1967. In 1967, he lost the national title to Jerry Proctor. When rival Bob Beamon was suspended from the University of Texas at El Paso, for refusing to compete against Brigham Young University, alleging it had racist policies, Boston began to coach him unofficially.[3] Beamon took the 1968 National Championships. At the 1968 Olympics, Boston watched his pupil obliterate the tied world record by jumping 8.90 m (29 ft 2+1⁄4 in). Boston was then 29 years old. He won a bronze medal behind Beamon and Klaus Beer and retired from competitions shortly thereafter.[1] He moved to Knoxville, Tennessee, and worked for the University of Tennessee as Coordinator of Minority Affairs and Assistant Dean of Students from 1968 to 1975.[4] He was the field event reporter for the CBS Sports Spectacular coverage of domestic track and field events. He was inducted into the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1974 and into the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame in 1985.[5] Later years Boston participated in the raising of the Olympic flag for the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, and by 1997, Boston had moved into Peachtree City, Georgia.[6] A Los Angeles Times article on Boston from August 2, 2010, coinciding roughly with the 50th anniversary of his initial world record, described him as a divorced great-grandfather who was writing an autobiography. He split his time between Atlanta, Georgia and Knoxville.[7] Boston died of complications from a stroke at his home in Peachtree City on April 30, 2023, at the age of 83.[8][9] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Ralph Boston". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 17, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2021. "Powell Leaps Past Beamon – Long Jumper Tops 23-Year-Old Mark". Seattle Times. August 30, 1991. Retrieved June 17, 2015. Bob Beamon Biography Archived March 3, 2016, at the Wayback Machine at thehistorymakers.com Betty Bean, "The Jackie Walker Story", Metro Pulse, November 22, 2007. Accessed at the Internet Archive, October 2, 2015. Carroll Van West, "Ralph Boston," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: June 20, 2014. "Olympic great Ralph Boston, Peachtree City resident, dies at 83". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Crowe, Jerry (August 2, 2010). "Fifty years ago, Ralph Boston leaped his way into history". Los Angeles Times. Rifkin, Glenn (May 2023). "Ralph Boston, Olympian Who Soared Into the Record Books, Dies at 83". The New York Times. Retrieved May 1, 2023. Organ, Mike. "Tennessee State and Olympic track great Ralph Boston, who set world long jump record, dies at 83". The Tennessean. Retrieved April 30, 2023. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ralph Boston. Ralph Boston at World AthleticsEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at the USATF Hall of Fame (archived)Edit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at Olympics.comEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at OlympediaEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee Hall of FameEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at the Mississippi Sports Hall of FameEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at the Tennessee Sports Hall of FameEdit on Wikidata Ralph Boston at the Team USA Hall of Fame (archive June 4, 2023) Awards and achievements Preceded by United States Jesse Owens Men's Long Jump World Record Holder August 12, 1960 – June 10, 1962 Succeeded by Soviet Union Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Preceded by Soviet Union Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Men's Long Jump World Record Holder August 15, 1964 – October 19, 1967 Succeeded by Soviet Union Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Awards Preceded by United States Rafer Johnson Track & Field Athlete of the Year 1961 Succeeded by New Zealand Peter Snell Sporting positions Preceded by Unknown Men's Long Jump Best Year Performance 1960, 1961 Succeeded by Soviet Union Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Preceded by United States Phil Shinnick Men's Long Jump Best Year Performance 1964, 1965 Succeeded by Soviet Union Igor Ter-Ovanesyan vte Olympic champions in men's long jump vte Pan American Champions in men's long jump vte US National Championship winners in men's long jump vte 1960 USA Olympic track and field team vte 1964 USA Olympic track and field team vte 1968 USA Olympic track and field team vte USTFCCCA Collegiate Track & Field/Cross Country Athlete Hall of Fame
Leontyne Price
Leontyne Price
Famous Opera Star featured in the Laurel Mississippi Museum.
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Leontyne Price
Leontyne Price: A Legendary Met Career By Peter Clark Metropolitan Opera audiences began an extraordinary love affair with American soprano Leontyne Price immediately upon her debut on January 27, 1961. She was by then an internationally heralded singer and an experienced, refined musician and artist. But more than anything, it was the sheer beauty of her voice that excited her listeners. What they heard was a vibrant, glowing, yet never metallic tone that called forth adjectives like velvety, soft-grained, and elegant. Her vocal production seemed effortless, free, and soaring, with plentiful volume and an amazing dynamic control. And the timbre of her voice was unique, personal, and immediately identifiable—she sounded like no one else. At the age of 90, in a charming interview for the documentary film The Opera House, she commented on her own voice, remembering when she heard the reverberations for the first time in the new Met auditorium, saying, it was “so beautiful you just wanted to kiss yourself!” This was not a prima donna’s vanity, but a mere statement of fact. And the audiences wanted to kiss her too, for hearing Leontyne Price live was an experience not to be forgotten. Price was a known entity by the time of her Met debut. She had been brought to the attention of General Manager Rudolf Bing as early as 1952 when the young Juilliard graduate starred in a touring company of Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess that also played on Broadway. Her vocal qualities had drawn critical admiration, and in 1953 she was invited to sing “Summertime” for a radio broadcast Met fundraising event, held at the Ritz Theater. Her growing career in Europe included debuts at the Vienna State Opera, London’s Royal Opera, the Salzburg Festival, and the Verona Arena. It was at the last of these that Bing heard her as Leonora in Il Trovatore and offered her a contract backstage afterwards, together with her co-star, tenor Franco Corelli. (Price and Corelli are pictured above with Bing.) Price’s Met debut, again as Leonora, met with critical approval as well as sensational public success. From Harold Schoenberg’s New York Times review: “Her voice, warm and luscious, has enough volume to fill the house with ease, and she has a good technique to back up the voice itself. She even took the trills as written, and nothing in the part as Verdi wrote it gave her the least bit of trouble … Voice is what counts, and voice is what Miss Price has.” Her triumphs continued as she took on new roles in the same season as her debut: the title roles in Aida (pictured at the top of this page from a 1965 performance) and Madama Butterfly (pictured above), and Donna Anna in Don Giovanni. Her performances were the phenomenon of the season as indicated in a Time magazine review of her Donna Anna: “If anybody was unhappy about her success, it was the Manhattan ticket brokers: obtaining Price tickets these days, they report, is about like wangling a reserved seat beside the first astronaut.” For her second Met season, Price was given the honor of a season opening new production of Puccini’s La Fanciulla del West (pictured above). Reaction to her first performance was positive, but at the second, she had to cancel after Act II. It was the only setback in her career, but the role of Minnie was perhaps a step too heavy for the still-young soprano. She carefully returned to more congenial repertory, wisely took a few months rest, and dropped the role of Minnie. Soon, she was back with new successes: Elvira in Ernani (1962), Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte (1965), and Amelia in Un Ballo in Maschera (1966). Then followed the greatest honor of all: Price was chosen to open the new Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center in 1966 as Cleopatra in the world premiere of Samuel Barber’s Antony and Cleopatra, composed specifically for the occasion. (Price is pictured above as Cleopatra, with Justino Díaz, who sang Antony.) While the opera did not garner much favor, Price had a personal triumph, and her status was confirmed as the company’s leading American soprano. But Leontyne Price was first and foremost a Verdi singer. More than half her 204 Met performances were as Verdi’s leading ladies. She added Leonora in La Forza del Destino (pictured above)—another of her finest roles—in 1967, and often repeated the Trovatore character of the same name. But it was as Aida that she was most famous and for which she set the standard still in force today. Her ability to shape Verdi’s melodies with a smooth legato and to approach the role’s high climatic notes without strain made her the unrivalled interpreter of the Ethiopian princess. She sang Aida for the opening night in 1969, again for a 1976 new production premiere, and finally for her own farewell performance in 1985. Price’s Met repertory of course included other composers as well. In addition to Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte, she sang Mozart’s Pamina in Die Zauberflöte. Puccini’s vocal style suited her less well than Verdi’s, but she was a notable Tosca (pictured above, with Cornell MacNeil as Scarpia), Butterfly, Liù in Turandot, and Manon Lescaut. She sang Tchaikovsky’s Tatiana in Eugene Onegin in English in 1964, and the title role in Richard Strauss’s Ariadne auf Naxos in 1979. Whenever Leontyne Price sang, it was an event. Among her most ravishing concerts were three performances she gave at the Met of Verdi’s Requiem, twice in 1964 in memory of the recently assassinated John F. Kennedy, and once in 1982 in memory of long-time Met assistant manager Francis Robinson. She also sang a special televised concert partnered by mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne with the Met Orchestra conducted by James Levine in 1982. It is impossible to speak of Price’s Met career without noting that she was the first African American superstar singer—one who was indispensable and around whom the company planned its season repertory. The legendary black contralto Marian Anderson had broken the Met’s color barrier in 1955, but she was at the end of her distinguished career and only sang one role in a handful of performances. As one of the company’s leading prima donnas, Price accompanied the Met on tour, including to several Southern cities where theaters were segregated. Her presence there was an important factor in changing the discriminatory policies. In fact, the rise of her Met career coincided with the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, and she was proud to be a part of it. Along with her exceptional artistic achievements, it remains part of her remarkable legacy. Peter Clark is the Met’s Director of Archives
Harve Presnell
Harve Presnell
He was a major star in FARGO.
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Gracie Fields
Gracie Fields
Where Gracie Fields stayed in 1958. I met her there. 30 West 54th Street, New York, NY.
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Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Looking happy and handsome.
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Lorenz Milton Hart
Lorenz Milton Hart
His birthday photo.
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Byron Janis and Maria Cooper
Byron Janis and Maria Cooper
A marriage that lasted from 1968 - 2024.
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Byron Janis
Byron Janis
Young Concert Pianist at Carnegie Hall.
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Byron Janis
Byron Janis
Memorial Photo.
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Byron Janis and maria Cooper Janis.
Byron Janis and maria Cooper Janis.
He is wearing black tie, so it must be a special occasion.
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Byron Janis
Byron Janis
Tribute from Maria.
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