Buddy Hackett

(1924 - 2003)

A photo of Buddy Hackett
Buddy Hackett
1924 - 2003
Born
August 31, 1924
Death
June 30, 2003
Last Known Residence
Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California 90210
Summary
Buddy Hackett was born on August 31, 1924. He died on June 30, 2003 at 78 years old. We know that Buddy Hackett had been residing in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California 90210.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Buddy Hackett
Born: August 31, 1924
Died: June 30, 2003
Place of death: Malibu, CA
Occupation: Actor/Comedian
Years active: 1950-2003
Known for: His film work
Buddy Hackett (born Leonard Hacker August 31, 1924-June 30, 2003 in Brooklyn, New York) was an American comedian and actor.
The son of a Jewish upholster. He grew up on 54th and 14th Ave in Borough Park, Brooklyn, across from Public School 103 (now a Yeshiva). Living next door was an aspiring baseball player named Sandy Koufax. He graduated from New Utrecht High School in 1942. While still a student, he began performing in nightclubs in the Catskills Borscht Belt resorts. He appeared first in the Golden Hotel in Hurleyville, New York, and he claimed he did not get one laugh.
Hackett enlisted in the United States Army during World War II and served in an anti-aircraft battery.
Hackett's first job after the war was at the Pink Elephant, a Brooklyn club. It was here that he changed his name from Leonard Hacker to Buddy Hackett. He made appearances in Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and continued to perform in the Catskills. He acted on Broadway, in Lunatics and Lovers, where Max Liebman saw him and put him in two television specials.
Hackett's movie career began in 1950 with a 10-minute "World of Sports" reel for Columbia Pictures called King of the Pins. The film demonstrated championship bowling techniques, with expert Joe Wilman demonstrating the right way and Hackett (in pantomine) exemplifying the wrong way.
Hackett was an emergency replacement for the similarly routund Lou Costello in 1954. Abbott and Costello were set to make feature-length comedy Fireman, Save my Child, featuring Spike Jones and His City Slickers. Several scenes had been shot with stunt doubles when Lou Costello was forced to withdrawal due to illness. Universal-International salvaged the project by hiring Hugh O'Brian and Hackett to take over the Abbott and Costello roles, using already shot footage of the comedy duo in some long shots; Jones and his band became the main attraction.
Hackett became known to a wider audience when he appeared on television in the 1950s and 1960s as a frequent guest on talk shows as those of Jack Paar and Arthur Godfrey, telling brash, often off-color jokes, and mugging at the camera. Hackett was also a guest on Jack Paar's last Tonight Show in 1962. He was on The Johnny Carson Show as a frequent guests. According to Trivial Pursuit, Hackett has the most appearances of any guests in the history of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. A collection of these appearances is available on YouTube. During this time, he also appeared as a panelists on What's My Line?.
Hackett also guests-starred in two episodes of The Rifleman, as one of the psychopathic sons, the other as a mop boy. He gave a serious and polished performance as Heath's faux-father on The Big Valley.
Hackett starred as the title character in Stanley, a situation comedy that also featured Carol Burnett and the voice of Paul Lynde. Produced by Max Liebman, the series aired live on NBC before a studio audience and was one of the last live sitcoms. Stanley revolved around the adventures of the titular character (Hackett) as the operator of a newsstand in a posh New York City hotel. In 1960, he appeared as himself in an episode of NBC's short-lived crime drama Dan Raven, starring Skip Homeier, set on the Sunset Strip of West Hollywood. Hackett also appeared many times on the game show Hollywood Squares in the late 60's. In one particular notable episode, Hackett was asked which was the country with the highest ratio of doctors to produce; he answered Israel, or in his words, "the country with the most Jews". Despite the audience roaring with laughter (and Hackett's own belief that the actual answer was Sweden), the answer turned out to be correct. After starring on Broadway in I Had a Ball, Hackett appeared opposite Robert Patterson in the 1962 film adaptation of The Music Man. Hackett became widely known from his role in the 1963 box-office success It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World in which he was paired up with Mickey Rooney, with whom he had also recently made Everything's Ducky (1961), about two sailors (Roonery and Hackett) who smuggle a talking duck aboard a Navy Ship. Children became familiar with him as lovable auto mechanic Tennessee Steinmetz in Disney's The Love Bug (1961). He appeared for one season as Art Carney's replacement as second banana on The Jackie Gleason Show, and in the 1958 film God's Little Acre. His later career was mostly as a guest on variety shows and prime time sitcoms, such as Boy Meets World in its fourth season. In 1978, Hackett surprised many with his dramatic performance as Lou Costello in the television movie Bud and Lou opposite Harvey Korman and Bud Abbott. The film told the story of Abbott and Costello, and Hackett's portrayal was widely praised. He and Korman did a memorable rendition of the team's famous "Who's on First?" rountine. In 1979, Hackett was the voice of the groundhog "Pardon Me Pete", and the narrator of the Rankin/Bass Christmas special Jack Frost. Hackett starred in the 1980 film Hey Babe! with a 13-year-old Yasmine Bleeth, in her first screen appearance. The same year, he hosted a short-lived syndicated revival of You Bet Your Life which lasted for one year. from 1980 to 1981. Throughout the 1970s, Hackett appeared regularly doing TV ads for Tuscan Dairy popsicles and yogurt. But his most famous television campaign was for Lay's potato chips ("Nobody can eat just one!") which ran for three years, from 1968 to 1971. Hackett guest-starred in the Space Rangers episode, "To Be Or Not To Be", as has-been comedian Lenny Hacker, a parody of his stage persona. The character's name was Hackett's own real name. In 1983, he was the subject of an HBO special, "Buddy Hackett Live and Uncensored" that revived interest in his stage routine. In it, he provides a classic Catskills routine while interacting with and jokingly harassing various audience members with an irreverent and decidedly raunchy comedy routine. A notable film performance was voicing Scuttle, the goofy little seagull, in Disney's The Little Mermaid (1989) and the direct-to-video sequel The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea in 2000. Hackett also appeared in the short-lived comedy series Action which starred Jay Mohr as movie producer Peter Dragon. In the series, he played Dragon's uncle Lonnie. He appeared again with Mohr as a judge in the reality show Last Comic Standing. Hackett's final film role was in the 1998 film Paulie, for which he played Artie, a pawnbroker. The film reunited Hackett with Jay Mohr once again for the third and final time in his career.
For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Hackett was given a star in the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 2000, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to him. On June 12, 1955, Hackett married Sherry Cohen, before moving to Fort Lee in the late 1950s, they lived in a house previously owned by a crime boss named Albert Anastasia. In his later years, Hackett and his wife established the Singita Animal Sanctuary in California's San Fernando Valley. Hackett died on June 30, 2003, at his beach house in Malibu, California, at the age of 78. His son, Sandy Hackett, said his father had been suffering from diabetes for several years which was aggravated by his obesity. Buddy's son Sandy also said that he suffered a stroke nearly a week before his death which may have been contributed to. Buddy's remains were cremated two days after his death on July 2, 2003, as Buddy's ashes were given to his family and friends. Buddy Hackett helped raise awareness of TAY-SACHS.

LinksEdit
MY BUDDY ...a NEW comedy and loving tribute to Buddy Hackett
Disney Legends profile
TheFinalDaysBuddyHacke.html The final days: Buddy Hackett's last Interview
"Buddy Hackett".
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Buddy Hackett
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Buddy Hackett
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Buddy Hackett passed away on June 30, 2003 at age 78. He was born on August 31, 1924. We are unaware of information about Buddy's family. We know that Buddy Hackett had been residing in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California 90210.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Buddy's lifetime.

In 1924, in the year that Buddy Hackett was born, Macy's department store in New York held its first "Thanksgiving parade" on November 27th at 9a - during church services but leaving plenty of time to attend the big football game between Syracuse and Columbia universities. The parade was held as a way to promote the opening of the “World’s Largest Store” and its 1 million square feet of retail space in Manhattan’s Herald Square. The parade was 6 miles long and included floats, Macy's employees dressed as clowns, cowboys, and sword-wielding knights, and animals from Central Park Zoo. Santa Claus, of course, brought up the rear - opening the Christmas shopping season for Macy's.

In 1942, Buddy was 18 years old when on February 19th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This authorized the Secretary of War to "prescribe certain areas as military zones." On March 21st, he signed Public Law 503 which was approved after an hour discussion in the Senate and 30 minutes in the House. The Law provided for enforcement of his Executive Order. This cleared the way for approximately 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry to be evicted from the West Coast and to be held in concentration camps and other confinement sites across the country. In Hawaii, a few thousand were detained. German and Italian Americans in the U.S. were also confined.

In 1962, when he was 38 years old, on August 5th, actress and sex symbol Marilyn Monroe died in Brentwood California. She was ruled to have died from suicide due to a drug overdose. There has been controversy regarding the circumstances ever since, due to her relationships with Jack and Bobby Kennedy.

In 1975, when he was 51 years old, in January, Popular Mechanics featured the Altair 8800 on it's cover. The Altair home computer kit allowed consumers to build and program their own personal computers. Thousands were sold in the first month.

In 1984, Buddy was 60 years old when on January 1, "Baby Bells" were created. AT&T had been the provider of telephone service (and equipment) in the United States. The company kept Western Electric, Bell Labs, and AT&T Long Distance. Seven new regional companies (the Baby Bells) covered local telephone service and were separately owned. AT&T lost 70% of its book value due to this move.

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