Advertisement
Advertisement

Freda Leinwand (1932 - 2012)

A photo of Freda Leinwand
Freda Leinwand
1932 - 2012
Born
1932
Death
June 27, 2012
Summary
Freda Leinwand was born in 1932. She died on June 27, 2012 at 80 years old.
1 Follower
Updated: October 28, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Advertisement
Obituary LEINWAND--Freda, (1932-2012), photographer, passed away peacefully June 27, surrounded by her family. Ms. Leinwand is well known for a lifetime of dedication to recording the Women's Movement through photography, and in particularly for chronicling the Women's Literary Salon. She is also known for photographs of women working in non-traditional jobs, and of children and adults with disabilities. Ms. Leinwand exhibited in New York and Canada, and received notable reviews from the New York Times, Popular Photography, the Village Voice, and Artspeak. Her work is in the Schlesinger Library collection at Radcliffe College, the permanent collection of the Women's Rights National Historical Park, and the Library of Congress. Ms. Leinwand lectured at Columbia University, Marymount Manhattan College, and Apeiron Workshops. She was awarded a Veteran Feminists of America Medal of Honor and in 2002 received the Susan B. Anthony Award from the National Organization for Women. A petite creative dynamo, Freda is survived by four devoted siblings and six nieces and nephews.
Show & Tell Her Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that Freda is always remembered.
Update biography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell Freda's life so that she is always remembered.

Biography
Freda Leinwand
Most commonly known as
Freda Leinwand
Full name
Did Freda go by other names?
Other names or aliases
Unknown. Did Freda move a lot? Where was her last known location?
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Freda Leinwand was born in
Birth
Freda Leinwand died on
Death
Birth
Death
There is no cause of death listed for Freda.
Cause of death
Do you know the final resting place - gravesite in a cemetery or location of cremation - of Freda Leinwand?
Burial / Funeral
Heritage

Ethnicity & Lineage

Jewish.

Nationality & Locations

Where was Freda born and where did she live?
Childhood

Education

Did Freda finish grade school, get a GED, go to high school, get a college degree or masters? What schools or universities did Freda attend?

Religion

Was Freda a religious woman?

Baptism

Was Freda baptized?
Adulthood

Professions

Freda Leinwand (1932-2012) was a photographer known for her work documenting the women's movement, women working in non-traditional jobs, and children and adults with disabilities. Leinwand’s career and interest in photography began in the early 1960s, during the course of her work as a dialogue and a film editor for 20th Century Fox and MGM Telestudios, respectively. She pursued educational opportunities at Columbia University and the New School, studying photography with Ralph Hattersley, Joseph Breitenbac, and Marion Palfi. Her studies were worthwhile, as Leinwand’s images are not only useful as documentation and evocative of the women’s movement, but also simply stunning. In addition to the nearly 36,000 photographic images in Leinwand's collection at the Schlesinger Library, the collection contains diaries, notebooks, and the records of a documentary textbook project. THE PROJECT Among the treasures in the Schlesinger Library are photograph collections that document the women’s liberation movement of the late 1960s and 1970s: images by Bettye Lane and Freda Leinwand, both of whom spent years capturing the moments, both big and small, that made up one of the most transformative times in U.S. history. While the Schlesinger began collecting these photographs in 1979, their families, upon the death of the photographers, donated the bulk of their collections just recently. In 2014, the Schlesinger Library was awarded a Hidden Collections grant by the Harvard Library. The grant allowed us to select, catalog and digitize images that depict the women's movement, approximately 4,000 of the total 40,000 images, including prints, negatives and slides, in the two collections. Both collections came with donor-supplied metadata that we repurposed and transcribed to create the catalog records. This website acts as a curated view into these wonderful images.

Personal Life

Share highlights of Freda's life. Experiences, organizations, & how she spent her time.

Military Service

Did Freda serve in the military or did a war or conflict interfere with her life?
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Advertisement
Advertisement
Freda's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Leinwand family tree.

Freda's Family Tree

Parent
Parent
Freda Leinwand Freda Leinwand
Partner
Child
Partner
Child
Sibling

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add Freda's family friends, and her friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about Freda.

Cancel

Share Freda's obituary or write your own to preserve her legacy.

Catharine Stimpson, Barbara Deming, Adrienne Rich, and Gloria Orenstein at The Woman's Salon, May 8, 1976. Copyright: Estate of Freda Leinwand. Last December, the Schlesinger Library’s archivist for audiovisual and photograph collections traveled to Manhattan to visit the former studio of the photographer Freda Leinwand, who passed away in June 2012. The Schlesinger first acquired works by Leinwand in 1980 and enjoyed an ongoing relationship with her over the subsequent decades. Leinwand’s siblings and her niece Kim Erle, recognizing Leinwand’s strong ties to the library, generously donated her photographs and papers to the Schlesinger. The archivist was part of a crew of people who packed up the thousands of prints, slides, negatives, and papers documenting a decades-long career. Leinwand was one of the original inhabitants of Westbeth Artist Housing, one of the first industrial buildings repurposed to house artist studios in the country. Formerly the site of Bell Laboratories, the 13 renovated buildings that make up the complex opened as live-work space in 1970. Sadly, the studios suffered incredible damage during Hurricane Sandy. The sense of community that was surely felt when Leinwand first moved into Westbeth could still be felt as people rallied around their neighbors and the artwork that was damaged during the storm. Among the treasures of the newly acquired Freda Leinwand Photograph Collection that document the women’s movement are images of the Woman’s Salon from 1976 to 1978. The New York salons, many of which were held at Westbeth, provided an opportunity for women writers to share their work with a supportive, all-female audience. Women's rights demonstration and march, August 26, 1970. Copyright: Estate of Freda Leinwand By photographing these events, Leinwand’s images have created a rare visual document and lasting legacy of their importance. Leinwand’s career and interest in photography began in the early 1960s, during the course of her work as a dialogue and a film editor for 20th Century Fox and MGM Telestudios, respectively. She pursued educational opportunities at Columbia University and the New School, studying photography with Ralph Hattersley, Joseph Breitenbac, and Marion Palfi. Her studies were worthwhile, as Leinwand’s images are not only useful as documentation and evocative of the women’s movement, but also simply stunning. Anti-woman's rights demonstrator, August 26, 1970. Copyright: Estate of Freda Leinwand In addition to the nearly 36,000 photographic images, the collection contains diaries, notebooks, and the records of a documentary textbook project. Visit VIA for a sampling of images from the Freda Leinwand Photograph Collection. For more information on the literary salons, see the Women’s Literary Salons Archive.
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Advertisement

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Freda's lifetime.

In 1932, in the year that Freda Leinwand was born, five years to the day after Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic, Amelia Earhart flew solo from Newfoundland to Ireland, the first woman to cross the Atlantic solo and the first to replicate Lindbergh's feat. She flew over 2,000 miles in just under 15 hours.

In 1942, by the time she was only 10 years old, on June 17th, Roosevelt approved the Manhattan Project, which lead to the development of the first atomic bomb. With the support of Canada and the United Kingdom, the Project came to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion. Julius Robert Oppenheimer, a nuclear physicist born in New York, led the Los Alamos Laboratory that developed the actual bomb. The first artificial nuclear explosion took place near Alamogordo New Mexico on July 16, 1945.

In 1950, by the time she was 18 years old, on October 2, Charlie Brown appeared in the first Peanuts comic strip - created by Charles Schultz - and he was the only character in that strip. That year, Schultz said that Charlie was 4 years old, but Charlie aged a bit through the years.

In 1985, when she was 53 years old, in May, a paper published in Nature by three British scientists reported that a huge hole was discovered in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. It was much larger than expected and is due to the use of manmade chemicals.

In 1998, when she was 66 years old, on December 19th, the House of Representatives initiated impeachment charges against U.S. President Bill Clinton. He was subsequently acquitted of these charges by the Senate on February 12th.

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later." Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends. These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top