Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson

(1873 - 1943)

A photo of Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson
Helen Elizabeth ( Finlay) Watson-Robinson
1873 - 1943
Born
1873
Death
February 17, 1943
Bendigo, VIC Australia 3550
Last Known Residence
Bendigo, Australia
Summary
Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson, mother to 1 child, was born in 1873. She was born into the Finlay family and married into the Watson-Robinson family. She was born to George Ralph Watson and Helen Finlay. Helen married Robert Henry Robinson, and they gave birth to Eric Robinson. She died on February 17, 1943 in Bendigo, VIC Australia at 70 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Helen Finlay Watson Robinson remarried after Robert Robinson's death . Married Stephen Francis Egan.
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Biography
Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson
Most commonly known name
Helen Elizabeth ( Finlay) Watson-Robinson
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Bendigo, Australia
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Helen Watson-Robinson was born in
Birth
Helen Watson-Robinson died on in Bendigo, VIC Australia 3550
Death
Helen Watson-Robinson was born in
Helen Watson-Robinson died on in Bendigo, VIC Australia 3550
Birth
Death
at Bendigo Cemetery in Bendigo, VIC Australia 3550
Burial / Funeral
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Helen's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Watson-Robinson family tree.

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Helen's Parents

Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson

Parents:

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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1834 - Sep 19, 1895 1834 - 1895

Relationships:

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Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson & Robert Henry Robinson

Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson

Spouse:

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Mar 14, 1864 - May 22, 1907 1864 - 1907

Children:

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Aug 15, 1903 - Mar 31, 1971 1903 - 1971

Friends:

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Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson, mother to 1 child, died on February 17, 1943 in Bendigo, VIC Australia at 70 years of age. She was buried in Bendigo Cemetery, Bendigo, VIC Australia. She was born in 1873. She was born to George Ralph Watson and Helen Finlay. Helen married Robert Henry Robinson, and they gave birth to Eric Robinson.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Helen's lifetime.

In 1873, in the year that Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson was born, on February 12th, The Coinage Act of 1873 was signed by President Ulysses S. Grant. It went into effect on April 1st and ended the use of gold and silver in the U.S. for currency - placing the country on the gold standard. The Act wasn't popular with everyone.

In 1900, at the age of 27 years old, Helen was alive when the U.S. helped put down Boxer Rebellion. The Boxer Rebellion took place in China, where the presence of "outsiders" (foreigners) was resented. The United States, along with Austria-Hungary, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, and Russia, had business interests in China and these countries all sent troops to put down the Rebellion and keep China open to their presence and to Christian missionaries.

In 1910, when she was 37 years old, the Mann Act, also called the White-Slave Traffic Act, was signed into law. Its purpose was to make it a felony to engage in interstate or foreign commerce transport of "any woman or girl for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose". But the language was so broad that it was also applied to consensual sex between adults when wished.

In 1938, when she was 65 years old, on October 30th, a Sunday, The Mercury Theatre on the Air broadcast Orson Welles' special Halloween show The War of the World's. A clever take on H.G. Wells' novel, the show began with simulated "breaking news" of an invasion by Martians. Because of the realistic nature of the "news," there was a public outcry the next day, calling for regulation by the FCC. Although the current story is that many were fooled and panicked, in reality very few people were fooled. But the show made Orson Welles' career.

In 1943, in the year of Helen Elizabeth (Finlay) Watson-Robinson's passing, on June 20th through June 22nd, the Detroit Race Riot erupted at Belle Isle Park. The rioting spread throughout the city (made worse by false rumors of attacks on blacks and whites) and resulted in the deployment of 6,000 Federal troops. 34 people were killed, (25 of them black) - mostly by white police or National Guardsmen, 433 were wounded (75 percent of them black) and an estimated $2 million of property was destroyed. The same summer, there were riots in Beaumont, Texas and Harlem, New York.

Other Watsons

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1907 - 1971 1907 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1891 - 1971 1891 - 1971
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1902 - 1971 1902 - 1971
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1906 - 1971 1906 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1904 - 1971 1904 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1910 - 1971 1910 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1905 - 1971 1905 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?

Other Robinsons

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1916 - 1971 1916 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1884 - 1971 1884 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1899 - 1971 1899 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1901 - 1971 1901 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1893 - 1971 1893 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1928 - 1971 1928 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1899 - 1971 1899 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?

Other Finlays

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1890 - 1971 1890 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1900 - 1971 1900 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1894 - 1971 1894 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1906 - 1971 1906 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1911 - 1972 1911 - 1972
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1916 - 1972 1916 - 1972
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1894 - 1972 1894 - 1972
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?

Other Bios

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1899 - 1971 1899 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1970 - 1971 1970 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1896 - 1971 1896 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1884 - 1971 1884 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1885 - 1971 1885 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1891 - 1971 1891 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1891 - 1971 1891 - 1971
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1906 - 1971 1906 - 1971
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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