John Albert Brown (1924 - 2010)

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John Albert Brown
1924 - 2010
Born
September 17, 1924
Death
January 8, 2010
Summary
John Albert Brown was born on September 17, 1924. He died on January 8, 2010 at age 85.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Albert Brown
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John Albert Brown
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John Brown was born on
John Brown died on
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Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery Section G-14 Row 18 Site 4 11501 Garrison Forest Rd, in Owings Mills, Maryland 21117
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Branch of service: Us Army
Rank attained: TEC5
Wars/Conflicts: World War Ii

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John Albert Brown passed away on January 8, 2010 at 85 years old. He was buried in Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery Section G-14 Row 18 Site 4, Owings Mills, Maryland. He was born on September 17, 1924. We are unaware of information about John's family or relationships.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1924, in the year that John Albert Brown was born, in May, wealthy college students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb kidnapped and killed 14 year old Robert Franks "in the interest of science". Leopold and Loeb thought that they were intellectually superior and that they could commit the perfect crime and not be caught. They were brought in for questioning within 8 days and quickly confessed. Clarence Darrow was hired as their defense lawyer, getting them life imprisonment instead of a death sentence. Loeb was eventually killed in prison - Leopold was released after 33 years, dying of a heart attack at age 66.

In 1951, at the age of 27 years old, John was alive when on February 27th, the 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution (which limited the number of terms a president may serve to two) was ratified by 36 states, making it a part of the U.S. Constitution. The Amendment was both a reaction to the 4 term Roosevelt presidency and also the recognition of a long-standing tradition in American politics.

In 1961, when he was 37 years old, on May 5th, Navy Cmdr. Alan B. Shepard, Jr., made the first manned Project Mercury flight, MR-3, in a spacecraft he named Freedom 7. He was the second man to go into space, the first was Yuri Gagarin - a Soviet cosmonaut.

In 1978, John was 54 years old when on July 25th, Louise Brown, the first "test-tube baby", was born at Oldham Hospital in London. Louise was conceived through IVF (in vitro fertilization), a controversial and experimental procedure at the time.

In 1992, John was 68 years old when on April 29th, riots began in Los Angeles after the "Rodney King" verdict was issued. Four LAPD officers had been accused of using excessive force (assault) on African-American Rodney King, who had been stopped for drunk driving. The beating had been videotaped. Their acquittal sparked a 6 day riot in Los Angeles.

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