Juanita L Jordan (1920 - 1995)

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Juanita L Jordan
1920 - 1995
Born
February 8, 1920
Death
June 11, 1995
Last Known Residence
Blooming Grove, Navarro County, Texas 76626
Summary
Juanita L Jordan was born on February 8, 1920. She died on June 11, 1995 at age 75. We know that Juanita L Jordan had been residing in Blooming Grove, Navarro County, Texas 76626.
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Updated: February 6, 2019
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Juanita L Jordan
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Juanita L Jordan
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Blooming Grove, Navarro County, Texas 76626
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Juanita L Jordan died on June 11, 1995 at 75 years old. She was born on February 8, 1920. We are unaware of information about Juanita's immediate family. We know that Juanita L Jordan had been residing in Blooming Grove, Navarro County, Texas 76626.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Juanita's lifetime.

In 1920, in the year that Juanita L Jordan was born, the Volstead Act became law. Formally called the National Prohibition Act, the Volstead Act enabled law enforcement agencies to carry out the 18th Amendment. It said that "no person shall manufacture, sell, barter, transport, import, export, deliver, or furnish any intoxicating liquor except as authorized by this act" and defined intoxicating liquor as any beverage containing more than 0.5% alcohol by volume.

In 1935, she was merely 15 years old when on August 14, the Social Security Act was signed into law. The purpose was to "provide federal assistance to those unable to work". The law established the Social Security Administration whose primary focus was to "provide aid for the elderly, the unemployed, and children". The Act survived many Supreme Court challenges and the Administration continues until today.

In 1947, by the time she was 27 years old, on November 25th, the Hollywood "Black List" was created by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Ten Hollywood writers and directors had refused to testify to the Committee regarding "Communists" or "Reds" in the movie industry. The next day, the blacklist was created and they were fired.

In 1975, Juanita was 55 years old when in January, Popular Mechanics featured the Altair 8800 on it's cover. The Altair home computer kit allowed consumers to build and program their own personal computers. Thousands were sold in the first month.

In 1995, in the year of Juanita L Jordan's passing, on October 16th, the Million Man March took place on the National Mall in Washington DC. The March was organized to address "the ills of black communities and call for unity and revitalization of African American communities". An estimated 850,000 people attended.

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