Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner

(1864 - 1959)

A photo of Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner
Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner
1864 - 1959
Born
July 24, 1864
Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Death
December 5, 1959
Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Summary
Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner , mother to 4 children, was born on July 24, 1864 in Pennsylvania. She was born into the Miller family and married into the Baumgardner family. She was born to Jacob M. Miller and Eva (Wingard) Miller, with sibling Levi. Lavina's partner was Jacob George Baumgardner, and they gave birth to Verda Lavina (Baumgardner) Frye, Miller Clifford Baumgardner, Iva Jane Baumgardner Watkins, and Savilla Mae Hillegas. Lavina died on December 5, 1959 in Pennsylvania at 95 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Most everyone in his lifetime comes in contact with a person who is in no way particularly outstanding, but who leaves a very marked impression in his mind. Such a person is my grandmother, know more familiarly known as Grandma. Her very appearance presents an excellent picture of benignity and peace with the world in general. Her hair is silvery white due to the fact that she was granted more than her share of troubles in her lifetime. Further evidence of these troublesome times may be found in the deep lines in her face. However, these difficulties have never dimmed the twinkle in her eyes. Her figure, like that of all good story-book grandmothers, is comfortably abundant. No Mid- Victorian gown is ever worn by her; but when she steps out, it is only in the latest style of clothing that she is dressed. This, of course, does not mean that she goes to extremes. Her ideas, too, have kept pace with the trends of the time. She bans a pessimistic outlook on life and goes to the extremes in optimism. One instance, the present war is not quite as important as keeping up with the neighborhood's births and deaths. Whenever a family war is on the horizon, Grandma favors the underdog, who is generally an in- law. Although, Grandma is a regular church-goer, she refuses to become a fanatic on the subject of religion. She is always willing to listen to the woes and weeping of all who come to her for advice. Maybe the reason for this is that she has acquired a broad and understanding outlook on life. What else could she do with thirteen children looking to her for help? Probably Grandma has had as many reasons to complain as the next person, but she has manages to conceal her heartaches, both physical and mental. Only the direct catastrophe forces her to reveal her true emotions. Though never known to lose her temper, she displays a bit of childishness at times, when she feels that she has been neglected. This has never been noticed by anyone but those closer to her. Personal illness has had a very small place in her life. The cookie jar at her home one of its most popular features, particularly when it is filled with her own inimitable ginger snaps. She has acquired a knack for cookery which cannot be easily surpassed. Both young and old treat her as one of their group, and this is truly a compliment to her versatility. Taking everything into consideration, she is to me, and to a great many others, a grand old lady.

--Essay written in 1942 about Lavina Baumgardner, by granddaughter Beverly Frye (1924-2007).
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Biography
Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner
Most commonly known name
Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Female
Gender
Lavina Baumgardner was born on in Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Birth
Lavina Baumgardner died on in Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Death
Lavina Baumgardner was born on in Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Lavina Baumgardner died on in Cambria County, Pennsylvania United States
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood
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Life Expectancy

Lavina's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Baumgardner family tree.

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Lavina's Parents

Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner

Parents:

Bio
Feb 21, 1841 - c. May 23, 1910 1841 - 1910
Bio
July 1842 - Mar 7, 1923 1842 - 1923

Siblings:

Bio
c. Aug 26, 1867 - Dec 23, 1965 1867 - 1965

Relationships:

Spouse:

Bio
Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown

Children:

Bio
Jun 24, 1901 - Sep 22, 1995 1901 - 1995
Bio
Mar 29, 1908 - Sep 7, 1965 1908 - 1965
Bio
Feb 14, 1883 - Feb 2, 1914 1883 - 1914
Bio
Jul 14, 1884 - Sep 14, 1962 1884 - 1962

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Randall Frye
84 favorites
Most everyone in his lifetime comes in contact with a person who is in no way particularly outstanding, but who leaves a very marked impression in his mind. Such a person is my grandmother, known more familiarly known as Grandma. Her very appearance presents an excellent picture of benignity and peace with the world in general. Her hair is silvery white due to the fact that she was granted more than her share of troubles in her lifetime. Further evidence of these troublesome times may be found in the deep lines in her face. However, these difficulties have never dimmed the twinkle in her eyes. Her figure, like that of all good story-book grandmothers, is comfortably abundant. No Mid- Victorian gown is ever worn by her; but when she steps out, it is only in the latest style of clothing that she is dressed. This, of course, does not mean that she goes to extremes. Her ideas, too, have kept pace with the trends of the time. She bans a pessimistic outlook on life and goes to the extremes in optimism. One instance, the present war is not quite as important as keeping up with the neighborhood's births and deaths. Whenever a family war is on the horizon, Grandma favors the underdog, who is generally an in- law. Although, Grandma is a regular church-goer, she refuses to become a fanatic on the subject of religion. She is always willing to listen to the woes and weeping of all who come to her for advice. Maybe the reason for this is that she has acquired a broad and understanding outlook on life. What else could she do with thirteen children looking to her for help? Probably Grandma has had as many reasons to complain as the next person, but she has manages to conceal her heartaches, both physical and mental. Only the direct catastrophe forces her to reveal her true emotions. Though never known to lose her temper, she displays a bit of childishness at times, when she feels that she has been neglected. This has never been noticed by anyone but those closer to her. Personal illness has had a very small place in her life. The cookie jar at her home one of its most popular features, particularly when it is filled with her own inimitable ginger snaps. She has acquired a knack for cookery which cannot be easily surpassed. Both young and old treat her as one of their group, and this is truly a compliment to her versatility. Taking everything into consideration, she is to me, and to a great many others, a grand old lady.

-- Essay written in 1942 about Lavina Baumgardner, by granddaughter Beverly Frye (1924-2007).
May 30, 2016 · Reply

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Johnstown Tribune-Democrat: Dec. 7, 1959

BAUMGARDNER - Mrs. Lavina J., 95, 153 Suppes Avenue, died at 3 p.m. Dec. 5, 1959 in her residence. Born July 24, 1864, in Richland Township, daughter of Jacob and Eve (Wingard) Miller. Preceded in death by husband, Jacob G., in 1938, six children; a brother and a sister. Survived by these children: Savilla, wife of Garnet T. Hillegas, South Fork R.D.; Bessie, wife of William H. Lane, Elton Road; Margaret, wife of J. Foster Eplett, 1191 Florida Avenue; Harry, Chambersburg; Verda, wife of John Frye, 153 Suppes Avenue, and Ethel and Miller, both at home; also a brother, Levi Miller, 801 Bedford Street. Also survived by 28 grandchildren, 52 great-grandchildren, and 41 great-great grandchildren. Member of Christ EUB Church. Friends received from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday in Meek Funeral Home, Ohio Street. Body will be removed at 1 p.m. Tuesday to Christ EUB Church, Ohio Street, to lie in state until service at 2 p.m., Rev. H.L. Loveless. Interment, Dunmire Cemetery.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Lavina's lifetime.

In 1864, in the year that Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner was born, on June 15th, Arlington National Cemetery was created in Arlington Virginia. 200 acres from the grounds of Robert E. Lee's home were set aside to be a military cemetery. The home and grounds had been in Lee's wife's family - she was a great-granddaughter of Martha Washington.

In 1875, she was just 11 years old when on March 1st, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act. The Act prohibited racial discrimination in both public accommodations and jury duty. Opposed by the public, the "public accommodations" sections of the Act were overturned by the Supreme Court eight years later.

In 1914, by the time she was 50 years old, in only his second big-screen appearance, Charlie Chaplin played the Little Tramp, his most famous character. The silent film was made in January and released the following year. Of the character, Chaplin said: "On the way to the wardrobe I thought I would dress in baggy pants, big shoes, a cane and a derby hat. I wanted everything a contradiction: the pants baggy, the coat tight, the hat small and the shoes large." The moustache was added to age his 24-year-old face without masking his expressions.

In 1932, when she was 68 years old, on February 27th, actress Elizabeth Taylor was born in London. Her parents were Americans living in London and when she was 7, the family moved to Los Angeles. Her first small part in a movie was in There's One Born Every Minute in 1942 but her first starring role was in National Velvet in 1944. She became as famous for her 8 marriages (to 7 people) as she was for her beauty and films.

In 1959, in the year of Lavina J. (Miller) Baumgardner 's passing, on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

Other Baumgardners

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Mar 29, 1908 - Sep 7, 1965 1908 - 1965
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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c. Aug 28, 1836 - Apr 12, 1912 1836 - 1912
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Apr 21, 1955 - Unknown 1955 - Unknown

Other Millers

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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Feb 21, 1841 - c. May 23, 1910 1841 - 1910
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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1925 - Unknown 1925 - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown

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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Jan 10, 1951 - Unknown 1951 - Unknown
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1855 - Nov 18, 1903 1855 - 1903
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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Unknown - Unknown Unknown - Unknown
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