Lottie Wood (1918 - 1984)

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Lottie Wood
1918 - 1984
Born
October 19, 1918
Death
March 1984
Last Known Residence
Thomasville, Davidson County, North Carolina 27360
Summary
Lottie Wood was born on October 19, 1918. She died in March 1984 at 65 years of age. We know that Lottie Wood had been residing in Thomasville, Davidson County, North Carolina 27360.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Lottie Wood
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Thomasville, Davidson County, North Carolina 27360
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Lottie Wood passed away in March 1984 at 65 years old. She was born on October 19, 1918. We are unaware of information about Lottie's family. We know that Lottie Wood had been residing in Thomasville, Davidson County, North Carolina 27360.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Lottie's lifetime.

In 1918, in the year that Lottie Wood was born, on November 1, an elevated train on the Brooklyn line of the subway - driven by an inexperienced operator because of a strike - tried to navigate a turn at 30mph. The limit on the curve was 6 mph. The 2nd and 3rd cars of the 5 car wooden train were badly damaged and at least 93 people were killed, making it the deadliest crash in New York subway history.

In 1924, she was merely 6 years old when J. Edgar Hoover, at the age of 29, was appointed the sixth director of the Bureau of Investigation by Calvin Coolidge (which later became the Federal Bureau of Investigation). The Bureau had approximately 650 employees, including 441 Special Agents. A former employee of the Justice Department, Hoover accepted his new position on the proviso that the bureau was to be completely divorced from politics and that the director report only to the attorney general.

In 1935, at the age of 17 years old, Lottie was alive when on September 8th, Louisiana Senator Huey Long was shot by Dr. Carl Weiss. Weiss was shot and killed immediately by Long's bodyguards - Long died two days later from his injuries. Long had received many death threats previously, as well as threats against his family. He was a powerful and controversial figure in Louisiana politics (and probably gained power through multiple criminal acts). His opponents became frustrated with their attempts to oust him and Dr. Weiss was the son-in-law of one of those opponents. His funeral was attended by 200,000 mourners.

In 1956, at the age of 38 years old, Lottie was alive when this was the year that the King of Rock and Roll, Elvis Presley, became an international sensation. He began the year as a regional favorite and ended the year with 17 recordings having been on the Billboard’s Top 100 singles chart, 11 TV appearances, and a movie. Elvis scandalized adults and thrilled teens.

In 1984, in the year of Lottie Wood's passing, due to outrage about "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (it seemed too "dark" to many and it was rated PG), a new rating was devised - PG-13. The first film rated PG-13 was "Red Dawn".

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