Warren Berlinger

(1937 - 2020)

A photo of Warren Berlinger
Warren Berlinger
1937 - 2020
Born
August 31, 1937
Kings County, New York United States
Death
December 2, 2020
Valencia in Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California United States
Other Names
Warren Berlinger
Summary
Warren Berlinger was born on August 31, 1937 in New York. He married Betty Lou Keim in 1960 and Betty died in Los Angeles, California. He died on December 2, 2020 at Valencia, Santa Clarita, California at 83 years old.
Updated: December 04, 2020
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Warren Berlinger was a character Actor in Films, Television and Broadway.
Born August 31, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
Died December 2, 2020 in Valencia, California, USA (undisclosed)

Warren Berlinger was born on August 31, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA. He was an actor, known for The Cannonball Run (1981), The Long Goodbye (1973) and Hero (1992). He was married to Betty Lou Keim. He died on December 2, 2020 in Valencia, California, USA.
Spouse (1)
Betty Lou Keim (18 February 1960 - 27 January 2010) ( her death) ( 4 children)
Attended Columbia University in New York.
Made an honorary Mayor and honorary Sheriff of Chatsworth, California.
Later tried to fight his comedy stereotype with more ruthless character 70s and 80s roles. One of his favorite parts was as J. Pierpont Finch in the London musical production of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" in 1963.
Often playing much younger than he was, he won a Theatre World Award for his performance in "Blue Denim" and went on to play his role in the film version of Blue Denim (1959). He was quite touching and sincere in the role of young Ernie, the best friend of Brandon De Wilde, who impregnates Carol Lynley.
Guest-starred on the original Howdy Doody children's TV show, with roles following on Kraft Television Theatre and other programs.
Nephew of comic icon Milton Berle, whose real last name was Berlinger.
Has four children from his marriage (since 1960) to actress Betty Lou Keim.
The couple appeared together on Broadway in "A Roomful of Roses" in 1955 and in his debut film Teenage Rebel (1956).
He was the son of Frieda (Shapkin) and Elias Berlinger, who was a building contractor and glass store owner in Brooklyn.
His grandparents were all Russian Jewish immigrants.
Deft, dark-haired, chubby-prone support and character actor who served up a number of comedic characters. Playing nearly 300 live TV roles in the 1950s alone, he went on to cheer up a number of lightweight film and TV comedies in the 60s and 70s.
Trained at New York's Professional Children's School, he made his stage debut on Broadway in Ethel Merman's "Annie Get Your Gun" at age 9.
He was a lifelong liberal Democrat.
Upon his death, he was buried beside his wife at Mount Sinai Cemetery in Simi Valley, CA.
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Biography
Warren Berlinger
Most commonly known name
Warren Berlinger
Full name
Warren Berlinger
Nickname(s) or aliases
Valencia in Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California United States
Last known residence
Male
Gender
Warren Berlinger was born on in Kings County, New York United States
Birth
Warren Berlinger died on at Valencia in Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California United States
Death
Warren Berlinger was born on in Kings County, New York United States
Warren Berlinger died on at Valencia in Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California United States
Birth
Death
Heritage

Ethnicity & Lineage

Jewish. Nephew of Milton Berle.
Childhood

Education

Columbia University, NY NY

Religion

Jewish.
Adulthood

Professions

Warren Berlinger, a busy character actor whose numerous roles made him one of TV’s most familiar faces from the Kraft Theatre golden age through the Grace and Frankie streaming era, died Wednesday at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia, California. He was 83.
His death was confirmed by daughter Elizabeth. A cause has not been announced.
With a cherubic face that could seem simultaneously amiable and, along with the hint of an accent from his native Brooklyn, mischievous, Berlinger was a go-to actor for supporting and sidekick roles for decades, both in film (with Patty Duke in 1965’s Billie, Elvis Presley in the following year’s Spinout and Burt Reynolds in 1981’s The Cannonball Run), and television (he played Joey Bishop’s little brother during the 1961 season of The Joey Bishop Show; he did not appear in the same season that costarred Abby Dalton, who died earlier this week).
After the Bishop show, Berlinger had a steady run in episodic TV through the 1960s, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. A small sampling includes Gunsmoke, Gomer Pyle: USMC, Family Affair, The Courtship of Eddie’s Father, That Girl, Bracken’s World, Love, American Style, Emergency!, The Dukes of Hazzard, Blansky’s Beauties, Charlie’s Angels, Trapper John, M.D., Murder, She Wrote, Columbo and Picket Fences. He made multiple appearances on Happy Days in the late ’70s and Too Close For Comfort in the ’80s, and his final credit was a 2016 episode of Netflix’s Grace and Frankie.
He was only slightly less busy on the film side. Following his breakthrough performance in the controversial 1959 film Blue Denim (about teen pregnancy), Berlinger had a steady run of movie roles for the next four decades, including in The Wackiest Ship in the Army, Spinout, The Long Goodbye, I Will, I Will… for Now, Harry and Walter Go to New York, The Cannonball Run, The World According to Garp, and That Thing You Do!
On stage, Berlinger made his Broadway debut as “Little Boy” in 1946’s Annie Get Your Gun, with subsequent roles in, among others, Take a Giant Step, A Roomful of Roses, Blue Denim, and in 1961, Neil Simon’s Come Blow Your Horn.
In 1956, Berlinger joined SAG and served on various committees over the years. “It’s taken me all day to be able to honor our dear Warren Berlinger,” tweeted actress Frances Fisher. “We met when we served on the #SAG National Board. We visited a month ago and he told us so many stories of his life, his career and his Union activism. He is a hero.”
Also in 1956, both Berlinger and his A Roomful of Roses Broadway costar Betty Lou Keim reprised their roles in the 1956 film version titled Teenage Rebel. They married four years later, and remained so until her death in 2010. Berlinger is survived by the couple’s children Lisa, David, Edward and Elizabeth, eight grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Personal Life

Liberal Democrat.
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Warren's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Berlinger family tree.

Warren's Family

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Parent
Warren Berlinger
Partner
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Sibling

Relationships:

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Warren Berlinger & Betty Lou Keim

1960
Cause of Separation: Death
Warren Berlinger

Spouse:

Bio
Sep 27, 1938 - Jan 27, 2010 1938 - 2010

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Amanda S. Stevenson
12.1k+ favorites
The first time I met him he was starring on Broadway in Blue Denim with Carol Lynley and Brandon deWilde. I was 15 and he was 21. I still have that original autograph from 1958-1959.
Dec 03, 2020 · Reply

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Veteran character actor of stage, film, and TV Warren Berlinger has passed away at the age of 83. The news was confirmed by daughter Elizabeth to The Hollywood Reporter.
Mr. Berlinger's seven-decades long career began during his childhood, playing "Little Boy" during the original Broadway production of Annie Get Your Gun starring Ethel Merman. He steadily worked for the rest of his life, appearing on Broadway in such shows as The Happy Time, Bernadine, Take a Giant Step, Anniversary Waltz, A Roomful of Roses, Blue Denim, Come Blow Your Horn, and A Broadway Musical. He also played London's West End in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.
Twice Mr. Berlinger brought roles he played on stage to the big screen, with 1956's Teenage Rebel (adapted from Broadway's A Roomful of Roses) and 1959's Blue Denim. Other film appearances include Thunder Alley, The Long Goodbye, The Cannonball Run, The World According to Garp, Ten Little Indians, and That Thing You Do!.
He was most active on television, with guest spots on Charlie's Angels, That Girl, Operation Petticoat, Friends, Columbo, and Murder, She Wrote. Mr. Berlinger appeared in five episodes of Happy Days, most memorably as Army Sergeant Betchler to draftees Richie, Ralph, Potsie, and The Fonz in the Season 4 episode "The Physical."
Berlinger was pre-deceased by his wife Betty Lou Keim, who co-starred with him in both A Roomful of Roses and Teenage Rebel. The couple had four children together.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Warren's lifetime.

In 1937, in the year that Warren Berlinger was born, on May 28th, the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge opened to cars. Taking 5 years to build, the 4,200-foot-long suspension bridge was an engineering marvel of its time - 11 men died during construction. The "international orange" color was chosen because it resisted rust and fading. To the present, it is the symbol of the City that is known throughout the world.

In 1949, when he was merely 12 years old, on January 25th, the first Emmy Awards (for television) were handed out in Los Angeles. Shirley Dinsdale won for the Most Outstanding Television Personality and Pantomime Quiz Time earned an Emmy for the Most Popular Television Program.

In 1950, when he was just 13 years old, on October 2, Charlie Brown appeared in the first Peanuts comic strip - created by Charles Schultz - and he was the only character in that strip. That year, Schultz said that Charlie was 4 years old, but Charlie aged a bit through the years.

In 1962, Warren was 25 years old when on February 20th, Lt. Col. John H. Glenn, Jr. became the first American to orbit the Earth. The Friendship 7 flew three times around the earth in 4 hours and 55 minutes. At age 77, Glenn returned to space - the oldest person to fly in space.

In 1988, at the age of 51 years old, Warren was alive when on December 16th, 1988 the popular film Rain Man was released. Featuring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise. this film brought attention to autistic savants and was based on the "megasavant" Laurence Kim Peek. The film would later go to win four Oscars including Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Director and Best Actor in a Leading Role.

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Sep 27, 1938 - Jan 27, 2010 1938 - 2010
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