John Henry Friday

Description:
A photo of my great-grandfather, John Henry Friday, who fought with the 8th Regiment Ohio Cavalry. He was seriously wounded in Virginia and spent time incarcerated in the infamous Andersonville Prison. He later homesteaded in Nebraska. For a story about his life-go to pixleyblair.tribalpages.com scrolling to the bottom of the homepage to 'Stories'. Click on: 'John Henry Friday-Soldier, Prisoner, Pioneer' A copy of this photo - which was probably done at the time of his enlistment in 1861 - was sent to what is now Andersonville National Park for their archives.

(A small portion of his story if you click the link: He was captured and incarcerated for about 8 months in Andersonville Prison in Georgia and he was exchanged just before the end of the war. According to wikipedia the 8th Regiment Ohio Cavalry..."served primarily in West Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia..." According to most government documents, John Henry was "Captured in action in Liberty , Va. June 19/64 admitted to the Hospital at Andersonville, Ga., treated for diarrhea and returned to
prison quarter Nov 11/64. Sent to Savannah, Ga. Nov 15/64 where he was paroled Nov 20/64 and sent to Camp Parole, Md. Nov 27/64 where he reported and was furloughed for 30 days. Return
date not stated and sent to U.S. Genl Hospital, Annapolis, Md. Febr. 1865." Camp Parole was built outside Annapolis where Union prisoners paroled from Confederate prisons could get a bath, a shave, fresh clothing and, if needed, medical attention. They would then
either be sent home or join their regiments.
Disability for Discharge papers dated June 19, 1865-describe him as "unfit to perform
his duties of a soldier because of a Gunshot Fracture of the left tibia and fibula causing ulceration of the anterior muscle of the leg". The document Declaration -- Invalid Pension State of Ohio, County of Franklin July 1865 states that "he was engaged with his company and regiment
(Co. 'G' 8th Ohio Cavalry) in Battle with the Rebel forces & that while so engaged he was wounded by a gunshot which struck him in the left leg about halfway between the knee and ankle, the ball passing entirely through the said leg, fracturing both bones of the same-that by reason of said wound he is almost totally disabled." That after being wounded, he was first taken to the Rebel Post Hospital in Liberty, Virginia-having been taken Prisoner by the said Rebel forces, in different Prisons until the 20th of November 1864." Therefore, John Henry was wounded and taken prisoner at or near Liberty, Virginia. Located between Lynchburg and Roanoke. (The town was renamed Bedford in the 1890s.)

John Henry's gravestone in the cemetery in Fairbury, Nebraska-has a marker noting his Civil War service.
Date & Place: Unknown
People:
Bio
1842 - 1909
Added
Updated Apr 05, 2019

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Comments

Ancient Faces
447 favorites
Civil War soldier who spent some time as a prisoner in Andersonville. Photo taken at the time of his enlistment?
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
KellieAnne Foreman
7 favorites
prob died of tb, and took it back home with him too
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Shirley K. Brown
I don’t think they had time or energy for PTSD. They probably had to get back to farming.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Jeanne Walsh Heyworth
Shirley K. Brown For the most part they could come home and work at least for sometime but it was a parent to their families that something was wrong. A lot of them found solace my meeting and pubs and bars and commiserating
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Kaydie Nielsen
Shirley K. Brown Mental illness is real and it's not a choice. Let's not pretend that it's something new that the younger generations have adopted. These men suffered from shell shock many harmed themselves and many harmed their families.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Shirley K. Brown
Jeanne Walsh Heyworth I just surmised what became of these men became I didn’t personally know any descendants of that war but I had three brothers who were in WW11 and the brother who was injured on Iwo Jima came home and got to work even though he was badly injured during their landing on Iwo Jima and laid in the water injured for many hours until the bullets died down enough to rescue him and his injured comrades. I suppose that is why I thought as I do.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
John Binfield
In the series “Hell on Wheels”, the character “Swede” was a prisoner there. It definitely effected him.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Milena Enright
John Binfield I thought about that character too
Apr 05, 2019 ·
John Binfield
My wife’s ancestor was a guard that escorted prisoners from the railroad to the prison. We visited in 2014. The visitors center is also the National Prisoner of War Museum, covering all conflicts.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Jean Salger
doubt very much if many 'suffered' from ptsd as people were cut from a different cloth back then, more able to handle the 'facts' of life...
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Barbara Eubanks
Jean Salger they learned to keep stepping forward. Life was hard.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Linda Mula
Jean Salger Dream On
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Kate Van Dyck
21 favorites
I don't think they handled it, they hid it and probably demonstrated other behaviors that nobody recognized as a result. Many would have said "jack just isn't the same person he used to be"
Apr 05, 2019 ·
David Mulcaster
Kate van Dyck or he's been drinking A LOT MORE since he's been back
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Edmund J Soboski
People are people no matter what time frame, countless were commited for acute mania as they called it back then, many commited suicide afterwards, read Living Hell: The dark side of the civil war.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Gina Marie
Jean Salger [external link]
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Joy Midkiff Alba
How did our grandfather's handle it when they came back after WWII? Same thing. People were tough as nails then too. Bad nightmares, hard drinking, suicide. Lost a sweet, farm raised uncle after Vietnam that way too.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Nola Rains
3 favorites
Edmund J Soboski. My grandma had an uncle who was in the Civil War. In later years he ended up in an insane asylum in Toledo, Ohio where he later hung himself. My grandma's father drank pretty hard or so I was told but he never got mean. He was involved in an incident in November 1864 where he was shot by guerilla forces in Tennessee. He and his best friend were both shot but not killed. They "played dead" while a number of their comrades were shot and killed. Great grandpa and his friend managed to make their way back to their company the next day. Grandma said that every November 27 her dad would go through a major depression and I can understand why!
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Edmund J Soboski
Nola Schieferstein-Rains Yeah these people saying they were cut from a different cloth are silly, they didn't all suffer from Psychopathy with impared empathy and remorse responce just because they are from a different time frame.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Jane Conlin
The Civil War prisons were brutal. I think life was so hard then for so many people, war was just another hardship.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Jeanne Walsh Heyworth
I think that is absolutely true and it's evident in the servicemen who fought in WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam....nothing is new but hopefully the treatments are
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Nola Rains
3 favorites
Jeanne Walsh Heyworth my dad knew a vet from WW2 who nearly lost his mind. I suppose he had ptsd. He had been on burial detail. When he got home he would disappear for hours and his family would find him wandering in the woods or just sitting on the river bank.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Laura Harmon Vickers
I believe there was PTSD but it was handled differently. People didn't have the service of going to therapy and working through their emotions. There was work to be done and life to live . It had to be incredibly hard.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Holley Hinkle Anthony
but perhaps hard work and a regular routine in a supportive family helped
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Laura Harmon Vickers
Holley Hinkle Anthony maybe.....
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Esther Smeenk
Sad eyes...
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Linda Collins
And he made it out of there alive?
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
AncientFaces
Yes - click on the link above and you can read about his life.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Becky Kelly
Love these old pictures.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Zindagy Drama Ha
So beautiful boy in heaven now.🌹🍀
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Nola Rains
3 favorites
I dont know about having PTSD but it definitely affected them. My grandpa and his brothers had a teacher who had been in Andersonville Prison. He was very mean and actually beat one of grandpa's brothers so hard with a club that his kidneys were damaged to the point that they quit working. Uncle Charlie died 3 days after the beating.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Jamie Coughlin
Nola Schieferstein-Rains I bet back then that teacher was beat to death after that. Things were much different then.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Nola Rains
3 favorites
Jamie Coughlin unfortunately nothing was done to the teacher. My great grandparents were German emigrants. Their kids were first generation Americans. Ii guess back then many of the German people thought a teacher's or a preacher's word was law and they wouldnt fight back. Uncle Charlie died in 1888..
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Carol Strube
Nola Schieferstein-Rains that is so sad.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Daniel Wagar
Sure they did. It was called by a different name back then. It was called "Shell Shock". There are old black and white videos of vets from WW1 suffering from Shell Shock. They are very hard to watch. These guys must have literally went through hell.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Lee Ann Forester Train
Daniel Wagar they called it shell shock in WWII as well.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Diana Nidick
No different then the torture given our civilian men held prisoner in Japan those who made it out where true Heros
And for those who didn't come home they fought untill they could no more ❤️
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Brigitte Cherubini
30 favorites
I have a great uncle that was a civilian POW of the Japanese on Wake Island, I think it was.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Elizabeth Gaye Jeans Thomas
Impressive to have survived.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Louie Lou
Gorgeous portrait
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Melissa Lowman
I’m surethey suffered PTSD it was probably just called something else or ignored. So many families have those stories about Uncle Bud who went off to war and didn’t return right. Most probably turned to alcohol. 😢
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Silvana Mastrolia
Melissa Lowman I had seen as well addictions/overdose/suicide.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Peyton Nail
Melissa Lowman it was usually known as being “shell shocked”, and little was known or taken seriously about the full effects of PTSD at the time. Civil War was absolutely brutal, home life afterward for thousands and their families was never the same
Apr 05, 2019 ·
I imagine they did, but there wasn't a name for it. You could not have gone through all the agony that these men put up with and not have PTSD!😥
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Tich Marsh
Denise Fiorina-Brzezinski it was what was called shell-shock. But it was regarded as a weakness in the person generally.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Carol Strube
War is hell no matter when it was . Very sad.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Ellen Payne Whitley
My gr great grandfather died of starvation in that hellhole. Those were horrible times that I hope we never see again (countryman against countryman).
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Jamie Coughlin
Ellen Payne Whitley I pray you are right. I am very concerned the way this country is going. 😢
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Ellen Payne Whitley
Jamie Coughlin me too. It's really scary.
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Gina Marie
Ellen Payne Whitley we can't fathom it. And today colleges need a safe space for people who can't tolerate words🙄
Apr 05, 2019 ·
Ellen Payne Whitley
I have 3 great grandfathers who were in the civil war. All three on my dad's side, 2 from his mother's and one from his dad's. The two from my grandmother (born in 1892) were her father Jackson Andrew Ratcliff and his father Rufus King Ratcliff. When J.A.Ratcliff joined, he was 16. He told my dad he stole food and buried the dead for the army as they didnt want to put the really young ones on the front line. He was however injured in the lower leg and was sent back to Jasper, Texas where he was from. When he recovered, he wanted to go back to the war. His dad, Rufus, decided to go with him. Rufus was in his late 30's. He was a saddle maker and made shoes for the Confederate army. When they were discharged at war's end, they were sent home via train to the closest train depot near Jasper which was 75 miles away in Nacogdoches, Texas. They walked the 75 miles home together. These people-no matter North or South - had a tenacity and strength we can't grasp today. 16 year olds were men. Period. My dad (born 1915) was working at 14. I could go on and on but just wow. I'm very humbled to come from Texan pioneer stock. You can view the grave of Rufus King Ratcliff in find-a-grave website and there is a shoemaker's form as a headstone.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Gina Marie
Ellen Payne Whitley fabulous family and American history!! And today we tear down and destroy American history.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Ellen Payne Whitley
Gina Marie thank you.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Ellen Payne Whitley
I love the old cemetary where J.a.Ratcliff is buried. This is the sweet headstone of his and my grandma Nan's last child. Crockett lived only 15 months and his headstone is just the sweetest. When I put flowers on the graves, I leave him a little truck or toy. I'm so sentimental 😞 I can't help it.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Patricia Pat Katzenmeyer Webb
People were tougher back then. They probably suffered from forms of ptsd after wars but they got back to their lives as much as possible. I do know of a man though who served in the 7th cavalry In 1876 and survived Little Bighorn because he was with Major Reno. A few years later his nephew found him living on the streets of Detroit and took him home with him to Virginia. I’m guessing he had survivor’s guilt.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Pam Kroetsch
My daughters’ grgrgrandfather, Daniel Charles Brown, died in Andersonville Sept. 1864, age 46....
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Cari Urbanczyk
82 favorites
He’s so young.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Nancy Thompson
I read "Andersonville" many years ago.. It was horrifying that people could be treated that way. My Mother's family is from the South. Daddy's great=great grandfather also lived in S Carolina.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Liz Ward
They had a name for It. War sickness. People react to trauma regardless of what era they lived in
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Linda Virtue
Liz Ward actually, it was called shell shock.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Nancy Buis
Terrible place:(
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Liz Cain
7 favorites
My Great Granddaddy David Gurganus was captured on his farm and marched from Alabama up to New Jersey to Fort Delaware as a POW. There he was starved and frozen to death with no blankets, clothing or food. They had to catch rats to eat. He died of what today is probably Meningitis ... a painful death on top of starvation and cold. His body was dumped in a mass grave on Pea Patch Island in the Delaware River. It's a castle-like fortress surrounded by a moat. It became infamous during the Civil War as a jail for Confederate POWs. 33,000 were imprisoned, nearly 2,700 died from dysentery, scurvy, and smallpox (They're buried in a mass grave in New Jersey). There's a slight difference in imprisoning invaders captured on your own land compared to those who force-marched people off their land that they invaded to be taken several states away for torture. Yes, war is hell.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Debbie Fernandez
Andersonville was reputed to be the most horrific of all civil war prisons.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Linda Virtue
Debbie Fernandez they had prisons for POWs up north that were just as bad.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Carol Strube
A friend of the family was in Naval intelligence he was a prisoner of war. Held captive by the Japanese. No word to describe what he went through for 2 years and survived. Never really ever recovered.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Barb Tousley
Heroes, both sides.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Darla Anne
You can see in his eyes that this man has been to hell and back and witnessed much trauma and sadness.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Linda Virtue
Darla Anne the picture would have been before the went to battle. His uniform and hat look new, not like he's been out in field fighting.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Darla Anne
Well if this is how he looked before, I'd hate to see how he looked after. This just doesn't look like a happy man at all to me.
Apr 06, 2019 ·
Donna Coyne
They called it shell shock, but yes, it existed.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Daniel Wagar
People were not tougher back then. They lived in a society where you didn't allow others to see hurts or weaknesses. So they dealt with it by drinking or beating family members or just falling apart. My 2nd cousin fought in WW2 for most of the almost six years that Canada was in it. He spent that time operating in foreign countries where there was no law or justice. You were the man with the gun. He said that when he came back that the hardest part was living in a society with rules. If someone picked a fight with you in a bar, he said his natural instincts were to want to kill that person; not to settle it with fists. He said it took more than 20 years to get over those kinds of feelings.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Bob Le Vene
Many of the gunfighters of the west were Civil War veterans...they were quite ruthless and killers.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Jennifer Drake
Of course they had ptsd
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Gina Marie
Civil war was the largest amount of casualties of any war ever --- by hundreds of thousands lives. 644,000 deaths. Children were fighting. You better believe survivors suffered...
[external link]
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Rebecca Bonner Ringer
Soldiers of every war have suffered from PTSD.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
M Ling V Tanqueco
everyone is a loser in war... even if you won, it still is pyrrhic victory!.. my deceased parents used to tell me first-hand stories of world war ii in manila, philippines and the word "horrible" to describe the scenario is an understatement... whether you are a civilian or a soldier, it really is pathetic... love not war!!! praying that there will always be peace on earth all through the years of our lives. 😿
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Joy Midkiff Alba
Im willing to bet EVERYONE in the country suffered PTSD by the end of the Civil War.
Apr 05, 2019 · Reply
Christine Maglinger Hubbard
Joy Midkiff Alba I was thinking the same thing.
Apr 08, 2019 ·
Joy Midkiff Alba
Christine Maglinger Hubbard Battle fields were backyards. There wasnt anyone touched by the Civl War. Or the Revolutionary War before that. You just NEVER KNEW when someone was gonna kick your door down, or burn your home down, or steal what food you had and leave you to starve, or rape and kill you. And no one was immune. It was Hell on Earth. :'(
Apr 08, 2019 ·
Lynda Locksley
Agreed. Even civilians were targeted, women and children. Sherman declared "total war" on the entire Southern population as his army marched through.
Apr 09, 2019 ·
Margie Curran Blignaut
I think much of what they saw and went through passed down through the generations. We have still not fully recovered from that
Apr 06, 2019 · Reply
Tina L Nelson
1st truly modern war with more wounded soldiers living due to amputation.
Apr 06, 2019 · Reply
Paula Randolph
My great grandfather did. But of course it wasn’t called that back then.
Apr 07, 2019 · Reply
Joan Lax Hamilton
My G. Uncle died in Andersonville at age 19.
Apr 07, 2019 · Reply
Suzanne Berglund-Edwards
They had to have had. I can’t bear to think of what they had to endure in general, being injured instead of a casualty, a prisoner of war. Travel, all of it.
Apr 08, 2019 · Reply
Barbara Pixley
20 favorites
He returned from the war and lived in Steele City, Nebraska where he and his wife Rebecca Krick Friday raised a large family. We visited some years ago and the house he built there is still occupied. For more about John Henry and a story I wrote about him-go to pixleyblair.tribalpages and his name into the upper right Find box and click on it. Also scroll to the bottom of home page to Stories to 'John Henry Friday: Soldier, Prisoner and Pioneer'
Apr 09, 2019 · Reply
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