Mrs. Christine Fisher

Description:
A photo of Mrs. Christine Fisher, 103 yrs old. She was born at Connelsville, PA ? May 11, 1796. Oldest living of five generations. Kodak picture taken by Mary D. Sinclair, January 1899. She is anxious to live into 1900 and will have lived during three centuries and during all Presidents' times. She reads her Bible that is on her lap often.
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May 11, 1796 - Unknown 1796 - ?
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Updated Jan 14, 2016

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Comments

Ancient Faces
450 favorites
Mrs. Christine Fisher was 103 years old when this photo was taken in January of 1899. She was born in 1796, and in the description says that she was anxious to live into 1900. I wonder if she made it. The stories she could have told…
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Viviane Lucena
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Beth Pritchard
Chances are, she ate sugar, bacon, drank beer, and had never heard of "detoxing" or Pilates. Bet she also walked everywhere she went!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Cindy Lewis
And no GMO...food was so much cleaner than..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
You bet. They worked hard too -- pumping water, carrying wood for the fire, driving the trap up and down hills and trying to handle the horse at the same time. No rest, women were equal to men in many ways then as far as work goes.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Beth Pritchard
The exercise they got back then just in daily activities made a huge difference. This generation knows a lot about so-called nutrition, fad diets, and hipster junk, but no one ever just walks anymore.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Beth Pritchard Actually I do. I racewalk. Everywhere. People used to say where is the fire and now they pay coaches to show them how it's done.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Ree Young
Food, air, and water back then didn't hold the toxins we ingest and absorb every day...and have been absorbing and ingesting for the last 6 or 7 decades, each year adding more substances to kill ourselves with.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Bill Manley
Loved that she lived that long..and l'm sure she made it to 1900..but let's not forget people are living longer these day..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Wendy Carson
Right !!...I know
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Mary Elizabeth
No actually things were not cleaner, nor was food. Go read Upton Sinclars book the Jungle. That brought about the movement to make sure food and drink was clean. They also went to the outhouse and had chamber pots, no vaccines and children dropped like flies. I am 52 and was born into a family that was old so I heard stories of the 1800's from people who lived in them and it was not a pristine world. Go walk through a cemetary from that time and see all of the people who died as children or in child birth or young. It is amazing.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Mary Elizabeth
Living the life in the 1800's. So much for public sanitation.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Dani Massaro
If you're talking about any time after the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, then no, air, water, and food were NOT cleaner. The median lifespan for people back then was almost half what it is now.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Mary Elizabeth Pre vaccination, yes. the 1900s were a time of change and we are all blessed to have been here to see it. At least the last half for me.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Lisa Miller
So many women died in childbirth or from just plain having too many children. Many people just worked until the couldn't any more. Work related accidents killed many younger people. If kids could make it to their teens (if disease did not kill them),
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Tammy Bess
Depends on where they lived. Rural/ country living was very different than city living.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Lisa Miller
Mary Elizabeth So true. The environment was no where as clean as it is now. People also had to keep working pretty much their entire lives.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Beth Pritchard
If you have a liver, you don't need to detox at all.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Cindy Lewis
Mary Elizabeth I was thinking of people who grew their own food ie farmers etc.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jo Les Sardina
Was thinking the same
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Chris Cheplic
Cindy Lewis, see the post by Mary Elizabeth for a dose of informed reality, thanks
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Michele Boyle
My opinion is that we adapt to our surroundings. I probably wouldn't survive as I am now back then. And they probably wouldn't be able to be plucked from that time and live in today's world. After a certain time frame, yes, but not immediately.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Beth Pritchard
Michele Boyle Good point. They'd be run over by a car and we'd starve to death because we no longer know how to produce anything from scratch.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Karen Werner Gillotti
And her food wasn't sprayed with toxins, GMO'd, and otherwise contaminated....
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Barbara Hammer Gunter
And she didn't eat fast food.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Athena Le Grand
People still live to be that old. Even older. I'd say genes and good luck have more to do with it. Happiness too. Good attitudes.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Oh yes... People didn't die "back then". Except for babies, men, women, children... Childbirth, childhood diseases for which there was no cure (not even "good food" -- if you had access to it), infections like tetanus, "cures" that were worse than the problem they were supposed to "cure", and all the other plagues and illnesses that we have preventatives and cures for...

Yes... It was a time when people pranced through life without a care in the world...

And died in droves...
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Bless her. My grandmother (b. 1898) almost was able to touch three centuries too but died six months before 2000. That says a lot, someone from that era living over 100 years! Nowadays it's normal but not then.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Clair Wascoe
Aww bless her I bet she had some story's x
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Brianna Ray
My great-grandma was born in 1897 and died in 2002. I remember asking her before the year 2000 if she thought she would see two turns of the century (and the millennium). She said, "Honey, I've lived to be 100, don't you think that's enough?" :) haha I miss her greatly! She was always blunt and to the point ;)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Gail Warner
Your grandmother sounds as though she was quite a lady. Bless her heart..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Brianna Ray
She was a fiery little thing! I so loved listening to her stories! Her mother died when she was 3, and her father remarried. She said that the woman who raised her was her mother. She never treated any of them any different from her own children. She always loved her with all her heart :) she sure saw a lot of change in her 104 years on this earth! She was sharp of mind until she was about 102 years old. As old as she was, I still wish we would've had more time. I was 17 when she died.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Yes she would have seen many many changes bless her.]\
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Cynthia Medeios
God bless!😇
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Judy Taylor Kozee
Wow, Would love to sit st her feet and listen.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Amy L Scott
how lovely. my great gramma made 101
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Giuseppe Sorbello
Pazzesco!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
BillnNancyjo Dowdy
AMAZING! can you only imagine! i pray that she made it to 1900 !
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lois Ost
beautiful!....
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Carla Stark
She looks a lot like my great grandma
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Cindi Krell Sitte
Oh my heavens, the stories this woman would have been able to tell. I do so hope she got her wish to see 1900.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Barbara Grant-Davola
Her book. Bible?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Linda M. Gigliotti
I wondered too but it's kind of thin? Note how they refused to smile in those days. One of my grandmothers wouldn't smile even in the 60s, for photos I mean.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
AncientFaces
Yes it's a bible - good eyes! In the description of the photo it says that she read her bible often. Back then I bet within the cover there was a basic family tree.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Nadine Heald
AncientFaces . . .and maybe a posie or two....dried, a happy memory...know my grandma did
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Judy Haccou
Linda - I think that had to do (somewhat) with the process of taking the picture - they had to sit still for a long time.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jim Retzer
Linda M. Gigliotti Not so much refused, but owing to the length of time required for an exposure at the time it would have been awkward at best to hold a smile that long. Older people, especially, would have perceived it it as a silly affectation to fake a smile for a photo (similar to the way we laugh at people who make a "duck face" in selfies today).
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Nancy Thompson
She may have had a crocheted book-mark cross in there like my great-grandmother and her daughter did. It's in my Bible now.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
AncientFaces
Jim Retzer lol - great analogy!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Jim Retzer Oh you mean that pout? The young ones think it's sexy. One of my grandmas was convinced she had to look serious but once in awhile she'd forget herself hehhehe.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Judy Haccou Boy I'd last four seconds.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Dorothy Guerra
I have a crocheted cross my Mom made for my Bible when I was a little girl!! :)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Beverly Jepsen
She's lovely...wonder if that's a Bible she's reading..
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Gail Warner
Yes it is..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Tracey Brown
Wow! My Grandmother was born in 1899......
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kim Isaac
Wonderful!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Catriona Wilkie
My family record is 103. I aspire to get to 104
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Margie Lester
Beautiful lady.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Beverly Jepsen
Amazing, with all the bad environmental issues, that there are loads of people living into their 90's and to 100 +...must be breathing good air and drinking good water somewhere ! 😉
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Tonya Hunt
Tammy L Eason Williams look at picture and read.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Julie Price
Bless Her
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Joni Mac
Hope it was a happy life
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jim Retzer
Cleaned up a little.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sheri Castro
She look pretty good for her age, especially for that time most people lived till their mid 40's.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sandra Bailey
Love these old pics !
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mark Dorsett
Mrs. Fisher looks as if she would put up with no nonsense.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lisa Miller
My four times great maternal grandfather died in 1810 at 99 years of age. It was a huge thing back then to live that long. He must have had one heck of an immune system :)
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jim Retzer
Is she missing her left hand?
It looks as though her sleeve just ends.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Charla Huff
I was just about to say the same!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Leigh Kennedy-Wilson
look at her face on the left side and her arm looks bound. She may have had a stroke with damage to the left side.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Siegfried Deniz
Looks like she has a Black glove on the left hand. When you look you see the little white fingertips
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jim Retzer
Possible, but then it begs the question of why is Grandma wearing only one glove?
What I'm seeing is the ruffled white lace at the end of an empty sleeve.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Her hand is under the book in her lap.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
She's not wearing a glove. That's her hand.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Patti Hickle Welch
She may have had a stroke.....
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
There nothing about her that suggests it. Her hand is hidden in the folds of her dress, under the bible. Her right elbow is on the arm if her chair and her left is not. Her face doesn't show and sagging which would be VERY apparent if she had a stroke that affected the side of her body. She's just sitting, as someone would.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jim Retzer
I can agree that, after looking again, her left hand does appear to be hidden in the folds of her dress beneath the book; however, in looking at the closeup of her face it seems equally apparent that one side of her face does appear to have been afflicted. If not a stroke, then perhaps some form of Erb's or Bell's Palsy.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Toni Gonzales
Awesome
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Scott Trontvet
SLUT
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Emma Venables
I'm hoping your Facebook has been hacked and you Sir are not an absolute imbecile and waste of skin and oxygen in real life!!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Scott Trontvet
Giggity
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Laura Aynes Blanton
He needs blocked
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Scott Trontvet
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Emma Venables
Kids, they can be so pathetic sometimes- I wish they'd make Facebook just for adults!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anita Helding
I wish I had know people like her. It would be so interesting to hear her stories !
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Christina Byrd
This is my favorite post of the day!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Melissa Moore Kyser
AMAZING! LOVE this picture!! I wish I knew howling she lived till, making it to 1900 or so!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Heather Edseth
5 favorites
Read above
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Melissa Moore Kyser
I have. It doesn't say if she did.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Melissa Moore Kyser
Thanks!!! She still lived a LONG time. What an AMAZING life!!!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Lolly Rios
Immediately I thought about her decendants ...did she have any...are any alive
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary Beth Malone-Chandler
I'd like to know if she made it. Great share.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Laura Harmon Vickers
What a long wonder filled life . Think of all she got to witness and all the changes she saw the country go thru
Wow !
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lauren Clements Anderson
I wanted to see her a bit clearer! Bless her heart!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lisa Self
Wow!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lisa Self
Colton Wayne Self
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Cheryl Tarrant
Sweet face
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Tony Mazzara
All that history she saw.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary Lou White
Can't find her on Find a Grave, but if anyone has Ancestry.com they might find when she died.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
My ex husband's grandmother died six days short of her 106th birthday. Her sister died at 104.

When she was visiting at one point, she got word that her brother had died at the age of 90-something... She said "It was only to be expected. He was always the sickly one."
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Linda M. Gigliotti
Ah geeeeeee! She had a great sense of humour.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
I think she was actually saying it as a matter of fact.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Charlotte Edith Anderson (she hated the name Charlotte)(back, centre) and her 5 siblings, 1956. Her sister, Mary, who lived to 104, is to her left. They married twin brothers. She was a nurse with the AEF in France during WWI.

L-R: Samuel; Ida; Edith; Mary; Susan; Art

Brothers John and Albert had already died.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
This was taken when she was a public health nurse in New Rochelle, NY, before the war. Since she was Native, no hospital in Canada would train her. The New Rochelle hospital had no problem and she trained there. She was the first First Nations woman in Canada to be trained as a nurse. I once net a woman on a bus whose grandmother was the first First Nations woman to be trained as a nurse in Canada. What are the odds?
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Karen Merritt
HahahaHahaha, sickly one! Now that's funny
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Marie Drebitko
Anneke Dubash Wonderful, Thanks for sharing. .:-)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Kathi Cramer
This made me chuckle out loud, how amazing that the sickly one made it into his 90s!! Love it
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
She kept a diary during the war. It mostly consisted of the details as they prepared to go overseas, preparing the hospital, and socials and tea dances... until the war for the Americans really got underway. She mentioned one tea dance which was attended by the great flying ace, Eddie Rickenbacker. He asked her to dance. She said "he was very handsome but a bit full of himself".

Then her entries became more sparse. So little time to sit down and write about the horrors of war, though she did write about a few very poignant entries.

She wrote about a young man who had been gassed. He was recovering and I think they must have been rather sweet on each other. I can't recall his first name (John?). His last name was King. He was from Waterloo, Iowa. One night his lungs started hemorrhaging. They couldn't stop the bleeding and he died.

After the war, she went out and visited his family in Iowa. When she got married to my ex's grandfather, they sent her a huge set of silver cutlery.

I met her on her 100th birthday. She had lost much of her memory but she was very sharp otherwise. She loved to laugh.

I wanted to make an impression on her. When we were talking she took my hands. She smiled and said "Oh! You have lovely warm hands!!"

At her funeral, her grand-niece gave the eulogy. She said that Edith had such cold hands that she was always pleased when someone had warm hands. I knew that I had made an impression, at least.

She was buried with military honours. Like so many men and women from the Six Nations of the Grand River, she had served in time of war. I was very proud to have known her.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Nancy Griggs Morgan
Amazing story, and you are a wonderful writer!
Jan 22, 2016 ·
Tiffy Avery-shokes
Awesomenesa. ;)
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anne Talbott
Amazing!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patricia Finley Brownfield
My family record is a aunt who was 106 with my grandma passing at 102
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Gail Warner
You are quite blessed with good genes..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Patricia Finley Brownfield
Thanks
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Terri Allen
Amazing. Would have liked to talk with her. Wonder if she kept a diary.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Philip Conway
www.werelate.org/wiki/Family:Michael_Fisher_and_Christine_Rider_Ryder_(1) I wonder is this her?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kelly Hansen
Yes, it is! Her maiden name was Rider. [external link]
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Brenda Huxley Stengel
Would love to had talked to her
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Karen Hall Cushing
Brian Cushing
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Scott Trontvet
●●●...She was a Nazi lovin Kitten killing Camel kissin Yugoslavian Smurf Herder from the fiery depths of Nazi Hell...But she Made a Great apple pie...!!●●●
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Pauline Tunney
Grandad
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kathi Penton Davis
I'll bet shes reading the Bible. And no glasses? Wow!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Bruce Williams
wonderful photo
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Fannie Mccormac
I hope she made it
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anne Snyder Elliott
Christine Fisher Pamela Fisher. Had to share this...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Pamela Fisher
Ha ha that's funny.. Good picture sis.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Connie Sue Emily-Hudson
She looks really good!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Nicole Yset
Tuff looking women I'm sure she had to be.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Gail Warner
Tough
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Julie Sterner
My great grandmother lived to 108. Born 1897, died 2005.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kelli Carter
Wow that was amazing..hope you share her longevity gene :)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Linda M. Gigliotti
Howly schmockers!!!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Julie Sterner
Lol, actually I'm adopted so I'm outta luck there!! But plenty of sufficiently elderly ancestors in my biological family tree, so I'm not too worried ;) I can make do with living into my 90s.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Julie Sterner
My great grandmother and me, 1980
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Julie Sterner
My great grandmother and me, 2002 at her 105th birthday party (she's happily chattering away in Hungarian to me in this photo - and I don't speak Hungarian! But she seemed happy with my smiles and nods, so it was all good!)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Marie Drebitko
Great story and surely memories! Thanks for sharing. .:-)
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Kristy BeLand Crawford
Wow!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jay Valente
Looks like she lived till 1907
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Connie Yates
They worked hard back in those days. Probably didn't have to worry about what they ate or exercise! Doing laundry on a scrub board, tugging the water buckets......the list is a mile long.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Denise Smith-Karg
My grandmother just passed in October..She was 104! Her birthday was Valentines Day! She was a blessing to us all...:)
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mick Burdge
She did not make it to 1900.
Christine Ryder, born 11 May 1796 Fayette Co, Pa, died 5 April 1899 Steubenville, Jefferson Co, Oh. She married Michael Thomas Fischer on 7 Dec 1812 in Steubenville.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
AncientFaces
Thank you Mick!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Barbara Wilson
Thanks for sharing her information, but sorry to hear that she didn't get to fulfill her dream.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Ginny Hedges Riggs
Thanks for letting us know.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Dana Ronevich
I live 20 minutes south of Steubenville, Ohio...small world.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Doris Krueger Buchmann
That's for posting that news, it's interesting to know.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Regal Cruz
Thanks for sharing.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Winnie Bryant Allen
So she didn't even make it to her 103rd birthday then so she was not 103 when the picture was taken.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jason Overholt
lolmath
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Mick Burdge
We need to keep in mind that, until the 1920s-30s, many many people did not know their true date of birth. There really wasn't much need to know and keep track of age.

Similarly, the spelling of surnames - by the people themselves - was often incorrect. Christine's maiden name was spelled both Rider and Ryder, and her married name spelled both Fisher and Fischer. One of my great great grandfathers Civil War service records consist of about 8 pages, and his surname was spelled 5 different ways!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jill Keller Davis
Bummer.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Marie Drebitko
Thank you Mick ..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Alicia Wolter-Lorincz
Awww, that's too bad.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Peter McGuinness
How sad
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Ellen La Scola
Darn it
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Vauna Reed
Married at 16.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Jan Mortimer
Bless her precious heart.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Mary Houston
Thank you Mick !
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Lisa Miller
Winnie Bryant Allen I think the post was talking about her getting to live in three centuries.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Michael Pottorff
Thanx, Buzzkill Mick.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Wanda Williams
My mom's maiden name Donnell had many spellings through the years , Mick Burdge !! McDonald , Mac Donald , McDonnell , McDonell , O' Donnell , etc !!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Wanda Williams
Actually , the Donnell's came over from Scotland / Ireland a few years before she was born and lived in Delaware and Pennsylvania , they may have known her !! Haha
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Vicki Stern
Thank you for the info Mick ~ I have Ryder in my line in Franklin County Pa & found this interesting
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anne Ahern
counting strawberry seasons
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Joni Maussang Martinez
ditto-thank you Mick!
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Edwina Hilner
Mick Burdge Yeah its crazy with the names. For the longest time i couldnt find some relatives, and found out that back then alot of them went by there middle name. I dont get it.
Jan 16, 2016 ·
Mary Ruggiero Pinto
That was my mothers hometown
Jan 16, 2016 ·
Donna Hazel
11 favorites
From a 2004 newsletter, her name was Christina Ryder Fisher, born May 11, 1796 in Connellsville, PA to William & Elizabeth Ryder. Sadly, she did not live to 1900 as she died on April 5, 1899 in Steubenville, OH.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Michelle Haggard
Great pic
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Bj Haussler
Bless her for living so long...........oh the stories she could tell. Love this !!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Connie Sue Emily-Hudson
Not only is it great she lived that long and looks so good, but back then the women women worked really hatd
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patty Reny
My grandma was born in 1900 and passed away in 2000. Sharp as a tack until the end. She lived on her own until 3 months before she passed. She did everything herself except drive. She was amazing!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Gail Warner
Bless her heart..
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Ellen Kallit Azotea
My grandma was born in 1901 and passed in 2004 a month after her 103rd birthday. Your grandma sounds a lot like mine, mine only required nursing home care the last 6 months of her life. I miss her ❤️
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Patty Reny
I miss my grandma and my mom. My grandma had 7 children and 33 grandchildren.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
John Thomason
My grandma was born in 1900 and lived til May 2004, 4 months before her B'day. She gave up her drivers license age 96 when she moved in with my aunt. She had gotten a notice at 95 from her ins company to get a physical. She passed but was concerned about driving. So she volutarily took her driving test and passed. Even though she had been blind in one eye since she was 4. She was very proud of that...lol... I just am amazed at the history our grandma's witnessed in their lifetimes. From riding horses and buggies to space travel....amazing!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Vicki Rensch
She looks like my great grandma Tarr. She was deaf and had her trusty corn knife on her lap. Everybody would make sure she SAW you coming because she would pull out her knife if you surprised her and subsequently she would surprise you right back!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Marilyn Koman Crace
I hope she made it!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
April Farmer
They are pur living history books
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Connie Sue Emily-Hudson
Hard and only one women in that first sentence.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Phyllis Cerel
If she lived to 1900 she would have lived in 3 centuries.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lee Ellingson
Andrea Krause Salazar Kari Cleary
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kari Cleary
She is beautiful!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Andrea Krause Salazar
I would love to hear her stories!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Tracy Antonelli
My husband's grandmother was Born in 1897 she died in 2000 at 103 yrs old she lived in 3 centuries! !!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sonechka RC
What a interesting things she could tell about the world!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Linda Ashley
There was a man in Marshfield, MA, who lived in all three centuries. Similar dates.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Janet Mueller
That is so wonderful! Wish I could have just sat at her feet and listened to her stories.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anna Salazar
How beautiful
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kori Halligan
How lovely!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary Houston
i hope she made it in to the 1900's she look as if she was A Holy woman i love to hear about these folks and their live's that is so very very different from ours ...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Nancy Harris
She didn't make it to 1900. See comments above. She died April 5, 1899 they said.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Mary Houston
Nancy Harris O" the story under the Photo just says the Photo was taken on Jan. 1899
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Sadly, she didn't make it to 1900. She died in April, 1899. Probably not too much longer after the photo was taken.

The Ancient Faces web page says that she was born in Connelsville, PA.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
AncientFaces
Thank you for this update!!
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Several other people seem to have found the same info at the same time as I did.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Ben Kaufman
Looks like her daughter lived to 91. Good genes.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
LaFaye Lincoln
lots of people never get the exact dates on someone unless they have the original documents. but close is better than not knowing...i always say...
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Robyn Leigh
Interesting seeing how long she lived that she was married less than 20 years...
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
She outlived her husband by 69 years...
Jan 14, 2016 ·
LynnMayhem Mayo
wow
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Jeff Cicotte
Sandy Chumley Cicotte
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kelly North
Wow...it says she "will have lived during three centuries and during all Presidents' times." Can you imagine being able to say you had lived "during all Presidents' times?" No one will ever be able to say that again.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Helen Dowling
Karen Snowball xxx
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Randy Jones
I would to have her tell stories of growing up.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Donna Lewis Terrellchad
I hope she got her wish!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Brenda Walls-Barnett
Looks really good to be 103!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patricia Dehne
My family Bible was lost-I remember there was a part to write down all the families birth and death,pictures and all and with golden edges. I wish I would of listened to my grandmothers stories,but I was a teenager and never sat by her and heard her stories. Of course I missed out on that when I turned 19 and she passed away. She was full-blood Native American and had a rough life being so poor,but made it to her 80`s and got sick with cancer. I would only hear bits and pieces later on about how they put the Native children in Indian schools and my grandma was one. Told how she was hit with a "stick"-which probably means ruler,on the hands if she spoke Native language by nuns. She had enough in 3rd grade and wouldn`t go back to school anymore. From then on,all her life she never learned to write and refused to after that. I`m sure she had lots of stories too and remember her talking in a very soft voice. Too late to listen now,but a great chance to listen to the elder stories and not forget what they say about our past. Don`t know if I`d want to live as long as this lady in today`s age,but everybody has to struggle somewhere in life to survive..the Bible was very important in them days when this lady had hardships as the Bible is important today. Today seems more evil though and got people turned away from it too much now.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Emilia Martini
3 secoli!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Janie Rambo
Just amazing !! She must of saw a lot in her lifetime. It would of been cool to of met and talked to her. :)
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
קלוד בר
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Shari Gray
Maybe an ancestor Kari Fisher Gibson ?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Lizzy Afshord
Amazing for that time
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Israel Anguiano
Impresionante!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
She had 4 children.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Marlo Black
2 favorites
If any of you would have researched this story...you would have known she died in the fall of 1900 ..So yes she made it to 3 centuries
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sharon Schaver
My great great great great grandmother Elizabeth Wilson Ferguson was born in 1772 and died in 1874. Her husband lived to his nineties. I'm sure they ate whatever they had. I have their photos somewhere.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Alexander McIntyre
What an incredible photo! I have seen a photo of the father-in-law of one of my 4th great aunts and he was over 100 in the photo, absolutely incredible to see!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Wilma McMichael
One of my aunts lived in three centuries - born in 1899 and died in 2001.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patricia Devine
Hope she made it too. And, in this picture, she sure didn't look 103 years old.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patricia Devine
Thank you for the updates Mick Burdge, and Anneke Dubash.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Russ Alvin Titus
My grandmother is 100 now.Born July 22nd 1915,still at home. Her great Grandma died in 1927 at 97 years old. She remembers her well..We have a picture from the 20's of her holding a bible also
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sharon Kirchner
Beautiful lady
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Scott Fischman
Claudine Fisher... Any relation?...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Scott Fischman
Scott Fisher.... Maybe your family?....
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Madeline Lewis
I would love to sit down and talk to her.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Regal Cruz
Rip.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary McCartney
She must have been quite a lady. Old school, Godly.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Danny Fisher
I have some relatives who came from that area., muskingum, Ohio.in 1823.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
SweetPea Logan
Is this one of the Fishers we are related to? Or is that my Mom's side!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Kyle James Munson
So she got to see John Adams, 2nd President to William McKinley, 25th President. She must've had stories to tell between all those years!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patti Hickle Welch
Oh the stories she could tell!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary Ellen Grayberg
How interesting, dang she didn't make it.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Mary Ellen Grayberg
She has such a cute little face she look like a nice lady.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sally Six
Great for u to have this pic
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Pat Hamer
interesting stories about interesting people Thank you!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jennifer Anderson
yes what times she would have seen... Arent we so lucky now we don't have to continually be dressed up in dresses, neck to knee, with girdles etc... What a wonderful old lady... just shows you, no fast food, no soft drinks people... just good plain food.... hmmmm
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Angela R Finn
Gosh I love this
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Ann Marie Troy
What changes she would have seen in her life
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Maureen Decker
I have this face!!!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Pauline Foote
so cool, thanks
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Claudine Fisher
Scott Fischman my family is from germany
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Diane Clifton Cox
I didn't see that Mich had looked her up - found that exact info. But she was 103, how much time do you want?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Margie Garrison Gilligan
Is she missing part of her left arm? Kinda appears that way the way this photo is. Maybe I'm just blind.
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Diane Clifton Cox
The way she's sitting she may have had a stroke that affected that left side
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Brandy Reed Graham
Wow, what I wouldn't give to be able to sit down with her. I could probably listen to her talk all day...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Shellie Manley
Has anyone else noticed that her left arm and shoulder are missing?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Christelle Vecchio
I would have loved to live in those times
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Julie Vallance
steubenville is where dean martin was born, he mentioned it in every movie
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Carolyn Thorson
Hi Christine
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Santa Shirley Beresford
wow
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Joe Ramirez
Diane Ramirez with her senior menu. Love you sis.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Diane Ramirez
LMAO
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Chuck Boiman
Absolutely magnificent. What I wouldn't give to sit next to her and chat. Tell me what you think she would say about us all and how we live. God bless her.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Andy Dunn
She'll have lived through your civil war then? Imagine everything she saw 'in her lifetime?' amazing!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
She was born just after the Revolutionary war.
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Andy Dunn
Yeah Anneke the Boston tea party era and mad king George.
To think this photograph when taken at a time of either Roosevelt(senior not Franklin D) or Woodrow Wilson maybe 'who was in the Whitehouse?'
And a world just moving through the industrial revolution and the Victorian era and Jack the rippers dark epilogue was about to give birth to the twentieth century ' plus 2 world wars and the coldwar?
I'm fascinated by how we evolve from riding on horses then within 60 years can land on the moon? History and how these great leaps forward happen?
I mean that blows me away!
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Well. She was born well after the Boston Tea Party (Dec. 1773). She was born during the last year of Washington's presidency.
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
She died in April, so McKinley was President.
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
She lived during reign of George III (Mad King George) (1760-1820), George IV (1820-1730), William IV 1730-1837 and Victoria, 1837-1901...
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Andy Dunn
Old George Washinton!? I got that badly wrong didn't I? But I do know a little about American history y'know? I know about General's Patton and Mc
Arthur and Old Custor and moon landings and appreciate how beautiful states like Arizona and New Mexico are?
But I don't dig president Obarma or peanut butter 'which is why I had such a problem with Jimmy Carter? Old Ronald Reagan was the best US president I've ever seen myself, him and Margaret Thatcher didn't half kick ass with the c***s on the world stage back then! I so wish we had those two in today's world with ISIS and populations scooting and moving and the noise nuisance of Justin Beiber? And then theres that klaxon Miley Cirus (I call her a klaxon' as she's a siren)but she sounds like an air raid warning wailing system? other than that 'I'd like to intimately bang her daft' the little slantern of a f*** puppet her!
There you go, from the Boston tea party to miley cirus being sodomized? Just like the history I mentioned? Pmsl
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Teresa Regenold
She's very beautiful.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Alexandria Biondo
Mark O'Neil
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Hilary Brown
didn't know the people born that way back lived that long, thought they all died in their sixtys or there abouts
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Cherie Bellingham-Funez
I would like to know what this wonderful woman was like. To live that long, I bet she was feisty.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Donna Johnson
I sure hope so...beautiful lady!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Brigitte Verbeek
Fascinating...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Patricia Palermo
Love it! And look: she's READING!! Secret to intelligence and long life??
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Nancy Harris
Dang.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Diane Fox
What a grande dame. Just beautiful in her wisdom.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jan Mortimer
I love these old pictures, they are so beautiful & story inspiring.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Chandler Fisher
Paulette Williams where did you find this picture of my cousin Christine...she still alive, lives across the street from Elvis.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Paulette Williams
Hahahaha
Jan 14, 2016 ·
Chrissie Quick
Does anyone else see the young woman smiling to her in the windowpane?
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Susan Hile Lambert
well she almost made it. God bless her.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Barb Walton
15 favorites
My Grandma was born in 1902 and died in 2002. She had lovely stories to tell. She met Jessie James, rode on a train to the west coast, found sea shells in north Kansas. They are amazing women these ancestors of ours.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
April VeVea
Jesse James died in 1882...
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Evan Harkrader
Pwned
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Francis A. Mac Donald
Looks like a Bible she is reading.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Rosa Maria Garcia
Bonita foto, pero llegar a esa edad y así como la señora es dificil
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Christina Skeaping
That is so interesting. To see a very early photo and then get to read all the wonder family stories. Thank u for sharing the info
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Jessica Carlson
Thank you for sharing♡
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Ruthie Crowther
How neat. Wish she could have made it.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Stephanie Jarrett
Wow, one can only imagine the things she saw during her lifetime!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Deborah Mobberly
I wish someone had written her stories down. I would loved to have talked to her. She helped make this country. Yes back then the food did not have the garbage in their food we have. You see that Bible in her lap she lived by it. Praise God for wonderful women and men like her. Thanks to the family that shared this.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Donna Gantt
Loving, wise face.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Elysabeth Middleton
2 favorites
I found her listed on the WorldConnect website... She died 5 APR 1899 in Steubenville,Jefferson County,Ohio ([external link])
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Nanda Amaral
I wonder how her eyes were
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Constance Steele
Thats great
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
TrishandBilly MacRae
Wow
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Nell Huamán R
Cute.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Judy Carlon Olson
Yes, Dan; people should talk with older relatives and learn about their pasts. I didn't and sure do wish I had.
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
John Dobson
Love the old pictures
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
AiRin Cobb
My gosh! Could you even imagine!!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Sherry Taylor House
I agree, to have a video camera & get her going. Wow!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
She had 7 children...
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
Her husband, Thomas Michael (Mikel) Fisher was the grandson of one Baron Ludwig Von Fischer. The Baron and his son John (father of Christine Rider Ryder's husband Michael) came to America after being exiled from Bavaria "for killing a deer in the Royal Park."

He brought with him, his only son, Johannus (John), locating at a little town called Germana, nor far from Winchester, Virginia. He died in 1777 in Madison County, Va.

Johannus Christopher Fischer was born 24 Dec. 1756 in Bavaria.

According to the information on the following webpage, "Years ago the heirs of Ludwig Von Fischer had prospect of a settlement of a loan to the German government, made by Baron Fisher's father to the German Government, of eighty million dollars. The sum represented principal & interest. At that time there were five hundred heirs in this country..."

[external link]
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Gina Kingsbury
Oh...I wish she had!
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
Thomas Michael's parents, Johannus Christoph Fischer and Susannah Bratton

[external link]

Johannus Christoph Fischer, changed his name to John Christopher Fisher. Came to Jefferson Co. Ohio 1806. Started the first pottery west of the mountains, died shortly after. He served in the Rev. War. Pvt. 2nd. Contl. Line of Va. Marker by D.A.R. John's grave was found during some constuction in Steubenville, removed and placed in Union Cemetery. Sec. O Lot 47
Jan 14, 2016 · Reply
Yuji Wada
God Amen!!
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Nancy Evoy-Bee
Lisa Murdaugh, aspirin was invented in 1853 :-)
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Chris Coyle
Does anybody notice she ius missing her left arm? Or is it just me???
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Thomas Curtis
Yes she is alittle to old for me he he I like the laidy to have some soft skin he he have a good day
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Mireille Duffau
elle ressemble à mon arrière-grand-mère, presque la meme photo !!!
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
James Phelps
wow that is smome thing;;
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
April Rain
love that, i want to go in 1899
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Sharon Rose Mollet Yost
skinny
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Maureen Trant
God love her.... She's so cute 💚🌹
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Cruz Nelson
Her faith in God kept her strong, small meals & hard work.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Lourace Coste
Wow
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Peggy Houser
I see so many long lifers doing genealogy that is spite of what our government says about our generation living longer and thereby raising retirement age, I don't believe that's true. If you take out deaths by wars and early childhood/childbirth then it is a different picture.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
Seriously? Whether you "take out" death by wars and early childhood/childbirth or not, people live longer than they did. That is a fact.

Quite apart from the fact that wars previously killed millions of civilians AND soldiers and childhood mortality in Western nations has been greatly reduced, the measure of the length of lives is measured on the percentage of adults reaching a great age. People do live longer.
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Peggy Houser
No they don't.
Jan 15, 2016 ·
David Goddard
Life expectancy has decreased
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Like expectancy had NOT decreased. It has increased. I have no idea where people get the idea that it has decreased. Statistics are very clear in that matter.
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Various charts showing that life expectancy has increased, not decreased. Feel free to post evidence of the contrary (from credible sources).
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Female life expectancy.
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Peggy Houser
All I can tell you is sit back and watch and I sincerely hope you are correct. I am by profession as RN and haven't seen an increase at all in the past 40 years and have been dealing with death and the dying since 1978. None of the statistics are valid. In order to raise retirement age for social security the government had to sc***e up something. Why do you think they left their fat pensions at 55? Because they know better. A recent Huffington Post article says if this is true we will all be living to be 115 this decade so I hope you are right. I don't have a computer and not that interested in this as I already know it is invalid as are most statistics. I took statistics, I know the reality. Research " Bread is dangerous" to understand how anything can be proved or disproved with statistics.
Jan 24, 2016 ·
Ray Portillo
Lord bless her Amen
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Eimir Maguire
Roisin this is when you were born!!
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Roisin Maguire ヅ
Yes because i am 117 years old 😟
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Eimir Maguire
😂 I read the date wrong! 1989, never mind lol
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Jean Schneider
I liked her attitude!
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Zack Garrison
Is she missing an arm?
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
Various charts showing that life expectancy has risen world-wide.

[external link]
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anneke Dubash
Female life expectancy
Jan 15, 2016 ·
Anne G Jones
Are you related to John Chapin of Chicopee, MA? I have an obit for him
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Anneke Dubash
1796: Washington was President.

The Jay Treaty of 1794 (or "Jay's Treaty") between the US and Britain came into effect. It resolved issues that had arisen from the Treaty of Paris and averted another war between Britain and the US.

The first "quadrennial" (4 years) election was held.

The first "contested" Presidential election (where there were candidates from other parties and where the outcome was not a foregone conclusion) took place. Washington had refused a third term.

The first and only election where President and Vice President were from opposing parties (John Adams, Federalist and Thomas Jefferson, Republican). John Adams elected as President, Thomas Jefferson elected VP.

Electors cast two votes in the election, one for President and one for VP (though did not state for which position). The candidate with the most votes was elected President and the one with the second highest became VP, even if BOTH candidates had been voted for as VP...

Tennessee had been admitted to the Union.

The Treaty of Tripoli was signed.

The "Panic of 1796-1797" (a financial crisis affecting Britain and the United States) was in full swing. The first "burst financial bubble" since the US came into being.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Saundra Crenshaw Hayman
She must have been a very healthy person to live that long. Wish she could have realized her dream of living to 1900.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Terry Wheeler
What a shame.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Douglas Stirling
Christine Fischer - you're holding up remarkably well! :)
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Lisa Fernandez
Looks like the grandmas here
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Mel Sharer
Strong Wisdom*
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
Pauline Kravath
What history she saw in her lifetime.
Jan 15, 2016 · Reply
John Boney
This picture tells a wonderful story. It just made my day.
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Hollie Yelffeh R
Hannah Novitsky you could do that!!!
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Tammy L Eason Williams
Tonya Hunt wow I need to get on this site,, to try and look up my moms back ground . Maybe wow so many stories to read.
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Tammy L Eason Williams
She's looks like me to what a resemblance. She looks like my mom a lot but older .
Jan 16, 2016 ·
Kim Wipf
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Margie Rose Cantrell
I SEE THEY ARE TALKING ABOUT FISHER AND FISCHER TWO DIFFERENT FAMILIES. THE FIRST POST WAS FISHER
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Margie Rose Cantrell
Hey fisher family she looks like our family
Jan 16, 2016 · Reply
Julie Knox-Birkhimer
I think I found her under the name Catherine on findagrave. There's also a Tommy Fisher in the same cemetery where their son is buried. [external link]
Mar 27, 2016 · Reply
Paul Manion
Are you the Jose whales the armys looking for?????
May 01, 2016 · Reply
JD Friedman
Lived from President George Washington to President McKinley, that's just incredible. Linked between living while the founding fathers were still alive, of course through Lincoln and the Civil War, right up until those who would shape America the 20th century (TR, FDR, etc.) were on their way to the top as well. Amazing.
Jan 15, 2017 · Reply
Margaret Lowe
My grandmother 1857-1959 was nearly 102 ; my mother 1910-2011 was nearly 101! I have always known I am here for the long haul, aging takes on a new meaning when seen from this perspective. Life is an amazing adventure!
Jan 14, 2019 · Reply
Chuck Boiman
Olivia Jasmin did you know this woman? Can you tell us more about her?
Jun 18, 2019 ·
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