Wiley Family History & Genealogy

26 photos, 25,622 biographies, and last name history of the Wiley family, shared by AncientFaces Members.
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Wiley Last Name History & Origin

History

Name Origin

Wiley Biographies & Family Trees

Find birth, death records, and obituaries of Wileys on AncientFaces:

Most Common First Names

  • James 3.1%
  • John 3.0%
  • William 2.6%
  • Robert 2.2%
  • Mary 2.0%
  • Charles 1.5%
  • George 1.2%
  • Thomas 1.1%
  • Joseph 0.8%
  • Richard 0.6%
  • Henry 0.6%
  • David 0.6%
  • Margaret 0.6%
  • Helen 0.6%
  • Dorothy 0.6%
  • Willie 0.6%
  • Donald 0.6%
  • Elizabeth 0.6%
  • Frank 0.5%
  • Harold 0.5%

Sample of 25,622 Wileys bios

Wiley Death Records & Life Expectancy

Other Wiley Records

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Memories

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RaymondFranklin Bass My mother began researching the family's history in the 1960s. It was not an easy task in those days but she was highly intelligent, she was perservering and she had a husband who cherished his every waking moment with her (and I don't care how corny that sounds) and they went off on their ancestor-safaris as much to be together as to gather information.

Even before they began to seriously dig through marriage records, birth records, probate records etc., in places like Petersburg, New York, Montpelier, Vermont and elsewhere, mom discovered a relative, a gentleman named Wilson Wiley. (A connection, by the way, that I have yet to rediscover.)

One day, we went to visit him on his farm in New York (I no longer remember what town.) Though we were unannounced, when Wilson Wiley opened his front door and my mother explained who she was and why we had come, he let us in. (Evidently, he recognized the connection.) The grownups sat around the kitchen table and talked. They eventually let me loose to play outside ... where I immediately discovered a huge hill behind the barn and I was off.

Wilson Wiley was an elderly man, with sharp features (but a kind eye) and relatively short. I never remember him wearing anything but dungaree overalls.... Which makes sense for a farmer, though by this time it was not a working farm, it was simply his home.

I never thought of him as "Wilson" or "Mr. Wiley" (which, at my age, I should have.) It was always Wilson Wiley.

We came back several times over the years and I remember one day Wilson Wiley showed me a pistol (the chambers were empty.) He laid it on the table and I picked it up. I couldn't believe how heavy it was. How solid it was. This was no toy...... I asked him if it was a six-shooter. He said No. It was a five-shooter. That was the gun that really won the West, he told me. I believed him. I still can feel the heft and the solidity of that gun. I still believe him.

Eventually, of course, we stopped going. Wilson Wiley had died.

I understand that his farm was sold and broken up into housing lots. It's all gone now, decades ago. Except in my head. And maybe, just a little bit, yours.

rb
Jan 24, 2010 · Reply