Olivia De Havilland

(1916 - 2020)

A photo of Olivia De Havilland
Olivia De Havilland
1916 - 2020
Born
July 1, 1916
Tokyo, Japan
Death
July 25, 2020
Paris, IDF France
Other Names
Olivia Mary de Havilland, Livvie
Summary
Olivia De Havilland, mother to 2 children, was born on July 1, 1916 in Tokyo, Japan. She was born to Lillian Fontaine and Walter De Havilland, with sibling Joan. She married Marcus Aurelius Goodrich on August 26, 1946 and they later divorced in 1953. They gave birth to Benjamin Briggs Goodrich. Olivia married Pierre Galante on April 2, 1955 in Paris, Île-de-France France and they later divorced in 1979. They gave birth to Gisèle Galante. She died on July 25, 2020 in Paris, IDF France at 104 years of age.
Updated: December 07, 2020
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Olivia de Havilland and her sister Joan Fontaine both became well known actresses and (sometimes) rivals. Olivia accomplished so much during her 104 years - you can read on for some of what she did below, as well as by scrolling down to the reasons for the rivalry between her and her sister.

From Wikipedia:

Dame Olivia Mary de Havilland DBE was a French-British-American actress. The major works of her cinematic career spanned from 1935 to 1988. She appeared in 49 feature films, and was one of the leading actresses of her time. She was also one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood Cinema, until her death in 2020. Her younger sister was actress Joan Fontaine.

De Havilland first came to prominence as a screen couple with Errol Flynn in adventure films such as Captain Blood (1935) and The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). One of her best-known roles is that of Melanie Hamilton in the classic film Gone with the Wind (1939), for which she received her first of five Oscar nominations, the only one for Best Supporting Actress.

De Havilland departed from ingénue roles in the 1940s and later received acclaim for her performances in Hold Back the Dawn (1941), To Each His Own (1946), The Snake Pit (1948), and The Heiress (1949), receiving nominations for Best Actress for each, winning for To Each His Own and The Heiress. She was also successful in work on stage and television. De Havilland lived in Paris from the 1950s, and received honors such as the National Medal of the Arts, the Légion d'honneur, and the appointment to Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

In addition to her film career, de Havilland continued her work in the theater, appearing three times on Broadway, in Romeo and Juliet (1951), Candida (1952), and A Gift of Time (1962). She also worked in television, appearing in the successful miniseries, Roots: The Next Generations (1979), and Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna (1986), for which she received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination and won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Television Movie or Series. During her film career, de Havilland also collected two New York Film Critics Circle Awards, the National Board of Review Award for Best Actress, and the Venice Film Festival Volpi Cup. For her contributions to the motion picture industry, she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
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Biography
Olivia De Havilland
Most commonly known name
Olivia De Havilland
Full name
Olivia Mary de Havilland, Livvie
Nickname(s) or aliases
Paris, Paris County, IDF France
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Olivia De Havilland was born on in Tokyo, Japan
Birth
Olivia De Havilland died on in Paris, IDF France
Death
Olivia De Havilland was born on in Tokyo, Japan
Olivia De Havilland died on in Paris, IDF France
Birth
Death
natural causes
Cause of death
Cremated, ashes scattered
Burial / Funeral
Heritage

Nationality & Locations

Citizen of United Kingdom, United States, France
Childhood

Education

Saratoga Grammar School, Saratoga CA
Los Gatos High School, Los Gatos CA
Notre Dame Convent, Belmont CA

Religion

Episcopalian
Adulthood

Professions

Actress

Personal Life

Academy Award (won), Best Actress To Each His Own 1946
Academy Award (nominated) Gone with the Wind 1940; Hold Back the Dawn 1941; The Snake Pit 1948
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

From Wikipedia:

De Havilland and her sister Joan Fontaine are the only siblings to have won Academy Awards in a lead acting category. According to biographer Charles Higham, the sisters always had an uneasy relationship, starting in early childhood when Olivia had trouble accepting the idea of having a younger sister, and Joan resenting her mother's favoring Olivia. Olivia would rip up the clothes that her sister was given to wear as hand-me-downs, forcing Joan to stitch them together again. This tension was made worse by Fontaine's frequent childhood illnesses, which led to her mother's overly protective expression "Livvie can, Joan can't." De Havilland was the first to become an actress, and for several years Fontaine was overshadowed by her sister's accomplishments. When Mervyn LeRoy offered Fontaine a personal contract, her mother told her that Warner Bros. was "Olivia's studio" and that she could not use the family name "de Havilland".

In 1942, de Havilland and Fontaine were both nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress‍—‌de Havilland for Hold Back the Dawn and Fontaine for Suspicion. When Fontaine's name was announced as winner, de Havilland reacted graciously saying "We've got it!" According to biographer Charles Higham, Fontaine rejected de Havilland's attempts to congratulate her, leaving the other offended and embarrassed.

Their relationship was strained further in 1946 when Fontaine made negative comments to an interviewer about de Havilland's new husband Marcus Goodrich. When she read her sister's remarks, de Havilland was deeply hurt and waited for an apology that never was offered The following year after accepting her first Academy Award for To Each His Own, de Havilland was approached backstage by Fontaine, who extended her hand to congratulate her; de Havilland turned away from her sister. The two did not speak for the next five years after the incident. This may have caused an estrangement between Fontaine and her own daughters, who maintained a covert relationship with their aunt.

Following her divorce from Goodrich, de Havilland resumed contact with her sister, coming to her apartment in New York and spending Christmas together in 1961. The final break between the sisters occurred in 1975 over disagreements over their mother's cancer treatment‍—‌de Havilland wanted to consult other doctors and supported exploratory surgery; Fontaine disagreed. Fontaine later claimed her sister had not notified her of their mother's death while she was touring with a play‍—‌de Havilland in fact had sent a telegram, which took two weeks to reach her sister. The sibling feud ended with Fontaine's death on December 15, 2013. The following day, de Havilland released a statement saying she was "shocked and saddened" by the news.[
Kathy Pinna shared
on Jul 26, 2020 1:57 PM

Olivia's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the De Havilland family tree.

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Olivia's Parents

Olivia De Havilland

Parents:

Bio
1886 - 1975 1886 - 1975
Bio
1872 - 1968 1872 - 1968

Siblings:

Bio
Oct 22, 1917 - Dec 15, 2013 1917 - 2013

Relationships:

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Olivia De Havilland & Marcus Aurelius Goodrich

August 26, 1946 - 1953
Cause of Separation: Divorce
Olivia De Havilland

Spouse:

Bio
Unknown - Unknown ? - ?

Children:

Bio
Sep 27, 1949 - Oct 3, 1991 1949 - 1991
+ Add

Olivia De Havilland & Pierre Galante

April 2, 1955 - 1979
Cause of Separation: Divorce
Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France
Olivia De Havilland

Spouse:

Bio
Unknown - 1998 ? - 1998

Children:

Bio
1956 - Unknown 1956 - ?

Friends:

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Olivia De Havilland, mother to 2 children, died on July 25, 2020 in Paris, IDF France at 104 years of age. She was buried in Cremated, ashes scattered. She was born on July 1, 1916 in Tokyo, Japan. She was born to Lillian Fontaine and Walter De Havilland, with sibling Joan. Olivia married Marcus Aurelius Goodrich on August 26, 1946 and they later divorced in 1953. They gave birth to Benjamin Briggs Goodrich. She also married Pierre Galante on April 2, 1955 in Paris, Île-de-France France and they later divorced in 1979. They gave birth to Gisèle Galante.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Olivia's lifetime.

In 1916, in the year that Olivia De Havilland was born, the Battle of Verdun was fought from February through December. It was the largest and longest battle of World War I, lasting 303 days. The original estimates were 714,231 casualties - 377,231 French and 337,000 German, an average of 70,000 casualties a month. Current estimates are even larger. The Battle of the Somme was also fought from July through September of the same year. Original estimates were 485,000 British and French casualties and 630,000 German casualties.

In 1921, Olivia was merely 5 years old when hugely popular Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, silent film star, was arrested for rape and manslaughter after an actress died following a party at his house. He was acquitted after three trials and the jury wrote a formal letter apologizing for the charges, but his career never recovered. His films were at first banned - the ban was lifted after a year - and he was mostly ostracized by the community. He died at 46..

In 1930, at the age of only 14 years old, Olivia was alive when as head of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, William Hays established a code of decency that outlined what was acceptable in films. The public - and government - had felt that films in the '20's had become increasingly risque and that the behavior of its stars was becoming scandalous. Laws were being passed. In response, the heads of the movie studios adopted a voluntary "code", hoping to head off legislation. The first part of the code prohibited "lowering the moral standards of those who see it", called for depictions of the "correct standards of life", and forbade a picture from showing any sort of ridicule towards a law or "creating sympathy for its violation". The second part dealt with particular behavior in film such as homosexuality, the use of specific curse words, and miscegenation.

In 1958, when she was 42 years old, on March 24th, Elvis Presley was inducted into the United States Army. Although he could have served in Special Services as an entertainer, he chose to become a regular soldier. Almost everyone thought it would be the end of his career - it wasn't.

In 1976, Olivia was 60 years old when on August 4th, a mysterious illness struck an American Legion convention in Philadelphia. Within a week, 25 people had died and 130 people had been hospitalized. It was the first known instance of what came to be called "Legionnaires Disease."

Other Havillands

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1872 - 1968 1872 - 1968

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Unknown - 2000 ? - 2000
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1670 - 1720 1670 - 1720
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1677 - 1744 1677 - 1744
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Sep 25, 1846 - Jan 27, 1905 1846 - 1905
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1922 - 2015 1922 - 2015
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1947 - Unknown 1947 - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1952 - Unknown 1952 - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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