Paul Brown

AncientFaces Member since Dec 22, 2002

About: Virgin, Brown, Merkley, Williams, Dinsdale, Rushton, Barker, Fairbanks, Grigg, Pell, Oyler, Turnbow, Gardner, Knox, Pratt, Houston, Stephens, Davies, Burton, Slator, Keep, Thompson, Stata, Bartholomew, Dickinson, Ettleman, Ellis, Shaver, Hixon, Hinyard, Boss, Couch, Mills, Bryant, Osborn, Ice, Boyd, Cline, Walker, Evatt

Researching: Ellis, Thompson, Brown, Davies, Bryant, Mills, Boyd, Burton, Walker, Williams, Barker, Osborn, Houston, Stephens, Gardner, Shaver, Pratt, Cline, Rushton, Ice, Hixon, Couch, Oyler, Dickinson, Merkley, Knox, Grigg, Boss, Bartholomew, Virgin, Fairbanks, Turnbow, Dinsdale, Pell, Slator, Keep, Stata, Ettleman, Hinyard, Evatt

Paul's Photos

The picture is of some of the children of Jeffrey and Alice Rachel Dinsdale and Mathew Dinsdale are on the back row Ben Robert and John are on the front...
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Dinsdale, Emma J., 1866, NA, Arkwright, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 175624 25692 Dinsdale, James, 1866, NA, Arkwright, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 175624...
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BIOGRAPHY OF ALICE RUSTON DINSDALE AS GIVEN BY HER DAUGHTER RACHEL AT THE AGE OF 83 Alice Rushton Dinsdale, daughter OF James Rushton and Jane Slater wag...
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Paul's Discussion Posts

Paul Brown Jo, I can help you look for Ivor T Davies, I have an Ancestry.com account that is pretty good at finding obituaries and death records. It would help if you could tell me Ivor's Fathers name, Ivor's birth date or birthplace. Any information you have on him would help. You can email me at readbofm@yahoo.com Regards Paul Brown
Jun 24, 2014 · posted to the surname Davies
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Xarissa Fairbanks Merkley Xarissa Fairbanks was born on October 29, 1838 at LaPorte, Indiana. She was the daughter of Amos and Mary Batholomew Fairbanks. Her mother died on April 7, 1843, leaving four young children. Xarissa was only four years old then. Amos and Mary had joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, so when he was left alone, Amos took his young children to Nauvoo. They lived through the hardships and persecutions of the Saints and with them made the long journey across the plains. Although she was only thirteen years old, Xarissa drove a wagon all the way, besides caring for the needs of the family, which included a year younger sister as well as her father and older brother. Times were hard and Amos was concerned for his children. Shortly after they arrived, he met and married Catherine Raymond, a widow, who had a number of children of her own. The family moved to Bountiful, but there was not much money and conditions were rather unpleasant, especially for Xarissa. She was a sensitive young girl who was given way too much responsibility while she was too young. When she was nineteen years old she had an unfortunate experience which resulted in a baby being born out of wedlock. Christopher Merkley, who had been baptized by John E. Page, had also come west with his wife and children. Christopher was a versatile, industrious man, and by 1858, had accumulated a farm with wheat fields an orchard, and large vegetable gardens. In that year, he heard of Xarissa Fairbanks. Although he was fifty, and Xarissa was only twenty, with the encouragement of his wife, Sarah, he asked Xarissa to be his wife. When Xarissa learned that Christopher was a diligent church worker and a prosperous leader in the community, she felt that the marriage would be an answer to her prayers. She accepted the proposal. They were married by President Brigham Young in his office on January 17, 1858. Christopher took Xarissa and her baby daughter, Fanny, home where his first wife, Sarah, welcomed them. He adopted Fanny. The two women were congenial and happy together. Each tried to help the other, and Sarah took the place of the mother Xarissa had lost when she was so young. In later years the children said they had, “never heard an angry word between the two women. They shared each other’s joys as well as their sorrows.” Xarissa was always strong and healthy, so she did the heavy, outdoor work. She took care of the garden and the orchard. She always made the fires whether Christopher was at home or not. She did the washing, the cooking, and made all the clothes. Sarah, who was never strong, tended the children, who called her Grandma, spun the wool, knitted the socks, and did the light house work. There were few comforts during the first years…. No washing machines, candles were made by hand with tallow set in molds to give light. The carpets were braided rugs. All the clothes were made by hand. Christopher and Xarissa’s children, there were eventually several, brought joy to the Merkley home. Fanny, the oldest, was a great help to her mother and brothers and sisters. When Chris and Jake, the first pair of twins, were born, Jake was a strong, healthy baby, but Chris was sick and sickly. He was hardly expected to live for the first year of his life. Due largely to the constant loving care of the three women, he became a strong and sturdy man, and lived to be seventy-three years old. During the early days of the settlement in Utah, there were many hard times. At the time when the grasshoppers and crickets came into the valley, the whole family worked in the fields to save the crops. Christopher made nets of burlap sacks. He fastened a hoop of wire in the top end with a handle attached. They would swing these nets as if mowing with a scythe, thus catching bushels of the pests which they burned or buried. Jake and Chris, holding the ends of a rope stretched across the field, would go from one end to the other keeping the grasshoppers moving. How happy they were as the hundreds of seagulls arrived and saved their crops! When the children were old enough to go to school, Christopher arranged for Xarissa and her children to go to John Morgan’s College. He bought a life membership in this school for her and six of the children, and they attended it for three or four years, thus fulfilling Xarissa’s lifelong dream of obtaining an education. At the time Johnson’s Army was threatening to invade Salt Lake City, the Saints were ready to destroy their homes and everything they owned if the army entered the valley. Xarissa and all her children were loaded into a wagon and went as far south as Springville. Only a few men and boys were left in Salt Lake to destroy the city. Fortunately, an agreement was made between President Brigham Young and the Army, which allowed them to enter the city on conditions that they would cause no trouble. Families gradually came back to their homes and resumed their lives, but those were really troubled times. Christopher was a good provider and had many schemes for making money. At one time he built a house on wheels, and traveled through the state taking “likenesses.” He took Xarissa with him on one of these trips to Southern Utah. By the middle of the 1860’s, polygamy was declared illegal by the U.S. Government, and the Saints who refused to give up their plural wives were sent to the State Prison. To comply with the law, Xarissa and her family moved to Bear Lake, Idaho, and lived apart. Christopher had been able to obtain a ranch there by trading some of his property in Salt Lake City. He also started a flour mill. Xarissa moved there in 1874. She and her children took a herd of cattle and nearly fifty head of horses to their new home. On the ranch, it was Xarissa who took the responsibility for the family. They first lived on a ranch about 14 miles from St. Charles. She was a good nurse, and was called out many, many times to attend to the sick. The night was never too dark, nor the job too hard for her to go wherever she was needed. Her son Al said. “Her home and all she had she would share with those in need.” Every Sunday for years Xarissa and as many of her children as were at the ranch went to church in a horse and buggy. They traveled the fourteen miles, there and back, and never missed a Sunday, and were never late. She was a devout Latter-day Saint, and raised her children to be fine men and women of whom she could be proud. She said they were the greatest joy of her life. Xarissa’s greatest pleasure, other than her children, and her church, was reading. She read everything she could get, especially the scriptures. She read all the latest news and magazines including Perry’s Monthly, the Juvenile Instructor, the Women’s Exponent, and later the Improvement Era. She always read the best. She had a good memory and was a great story-teller. She had many scrapbooks which showed the extent of her reading. When she finished with a volume of magazines, she would tie them together so she could pass them on for someone else to enjoy. She was one of those quiet people whose life is their most eloquent sermon. She lived to see all of her children, except one, happily married. Fannie married Amos Virgin, our ancestor. Chris stayed on the farm and ran the flour mill for a few years. Then Jake and his family moved there. Eventually, Xarissa moved to a house in St. Charles, where she spent the rest of her life. One of her sons, Jake, eventually moved to the Cardston, Canada area. Xarissa was able to visit him there on two different occasions. When she was 63, she went to help them with their first baby. Xarissa died in her home in St. Charles on November 29, 1904 from blood poisoning, caused by a splinter of glass which was lodged in her finger. Her last years had been happy and fulfilling. She enjoyed her children and her grandchildren who lived nearby. She was buried in the St. Charles cemetery. She had lived for 67 challenging and productive years, loved by all who knew her. Obviously, she overcame many difficulties to become one of the Lord’s most faithful daughters.
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Merkley
Paul Brown Life and Testimiony of Sarah Elizabeth Mower Alvord Sarah was born after the Saints had arrived in Salt Lake City to Henry Mower Jr. and Susan Strong Mower, after their joining the church with their separate families, meeting and marrying in Nauvoo, and coming across the plains. She was their third child, the second one to live. She was born 10 October, 1851. Her father was employed as a hotel manager and also sold provisions to California gold seekers on his own. For a time, they moved to Springville to be nearer his parents, but then came back to Union Fort near Salt Lake City because of Susan, her mother’s, failing health. Susan died 17 July 1856, leaving Sarah Elizabeth motherless at the age of five. Because of his daughter’s very young age, Henry decided it best to let his parents raise her. So she was raised by her aged grandparents, which meant she was left to do a lot on her own. She also went through the lean years when the grasshoppers and crickets devoured their crops, and she later told many an interesting story of their hard luck --- and happy times. Sarah had to help herd cattle toward the mountains. One day an Indian came and picked her up and put her behind him on the back of the horse. She had a serviceberry stick which she beat him with until he finally turned her loose. She said he used to come back occasionally to see his dark-eyed girl. Sarah’s eyes were black and very sparkling. Though life was often hard, never once did she murmur or complain. She married Joseph Bonaparte Alvord, and afterwards, they lived in a log house, though they eventually lived in a brick house. In addition to his being a teamster, they had a farm with milk cows and grew crops. While she had the skills to be a hat maker, her main efforts were to her family. Her daughter, Amy, remembers her ironing fresh dresses with an old heavy flat iron heated on the coal stove, and then hanging them on wooden pegs in the corner of the old house. She worked in the Relief Society from early adulthood until her death. And when Amy married, she said, “You must join the Relief Society.” [Told by Amy Alvord Hadley]
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Alvord
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Amos Moses Virgin [Amos Moses Virgin was born January 23, 1854, in Marston, Bedfordshire, England. After the family joined the church, they experienced a great deal of persecution and had to move to Birmingham to escape. But there, his father was killed in a mysterious accident at night by a locomotive which ran over him in a tunnel. He lived long enough to say that the locomotive had no light or signal on it to warn him of its approach. The family always felt it was a part of persistent persecution against the family for joining the church. In May 1862, as a boy of twelve, Amos came with his widowed mother, a bother and a baby sister across the ocean to America. They sailed out of Liverpool on the William Tapscott with 378 other Saints. On their ship was Francis M. Lyman and other church leaders. Amos told of reports on shipboard that a shark was following the ship, and he was allowed to go and see it. He also saw the ocean nearby covered with a large school of porpoises. There was a superstition among the ship’s crew that a death would occur or a bad storm would come in a day or two because of this sighting. A terrible storm did come later which broke down the main mast and the people were locked in their various decks. [They still believed this was just superstition.] When they got to New York, they continued on with the Saints, and eventually walked on their way to Utah. Amos’ mother became very ill on the journey, and his baby sister died. Thirty people of this company died on the journey. They arrived in Utah on 19 October 1862. After arriving in Utah, the family settled in Tooele, living with his aunt. But after a year, they moved to St. Charles, Bear Lake, Idaho. Amos helped his mother sustain the family there by fishing and trapping. When grown, on September 27, 1875, Amos married Sarah Frances Merkley. Together they had ten children, the oldest was our ancestor, Sarah Frances Virgin Shirley. Amos had never had the opportunity to obtain an education. But desiring learning, he organized study groups among the married couples in his community. They met in the Virgin home. They would read, discuss, and try to improve themselves intellectually. He participated in other community projects too, which included, “wood hauling parties.” They went up into the timber and cut trees. Then they cut the wood and piled it in the public square in front of the school house. A day would be set for sawing and splitting the wood. Everyone would join in. That night, when the work was done, the whole town would join in a public dinner and dance. The entire wood supply was donated to the school for winter fuel. After their daughter married James Frederick Shirley, and moved to Idaho, the Virgins decided to move there too. So in 1899, Amos and his wife, Sarah, along with their other eight children, bought a big 160 acre farm on the West side of his daughter. The properties were separated by a big canal and the main traveled road. Another daughter and husband had also previously moved to the area. The path to the Virgin home was remembered by the family as being bordered with flowers of every kind. But their house was old and made of logs. These were pioneering families of the Snake River Valley. The families enjoyed being together, especially their holidays. When they would spend Christmas at the Virgins, Amos, who had an organ with a tall upright back on it, and also a place to put a kerosene lamp, would play the organ and all would sing Christmas songs together. They rotated as to which house they celebrated holidays and birthdays. They held large family celebrations until the families grew so large they could not accommodate all of them in one house. Amos truly loved music. He not only played the organ, but the fiddle, a Jews harp, and a harmonica. They held youth dances on some Saturday afternoons, and Amos would always be on hand to lead the marches and to call for the square dances. Amos was a good honest man. His farm was large, and having no boys to help him, his girls often helped with the farm work, such as cutting and raking the hay and grain. When winter came and the children could no longer walk to school, Amos would hook his team on the bobsleigh, with boards on each side for their back to lean against. Then he put some covers over a layer of straw, in the bottom of the sleigh, for the children to sit on, and additional quilts to pull around them, or even over their heads. On real cold days the children would find some hot bricks under the covers to keep their feet warm. Always, because church was an important part of their lives, the family leaders would take turns each Sunday taking the families to Sunday School, or to meetings or entertainments of any kind. They always worked together as a team. Amos had a good voice and loved to sing. His children and grandchildren remember going to his house and hearing him and his wife and others sing, “Come, Come Ye Saints,” “and “Brittania, Brittania, rules the waves, Britains never will be slaves.” They sang many other songs too. But these two were favorites. He died 12 Oct., 1942, in Fish Haven, Idaho. Before he died, he did temple work for his parents, grandparents, and others. He died faithful to his covenants.
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Virgin
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Christopher Merkley Christopher Merkley was born in Ontario, Canada 18 December, 1808. His father was a farmer and Christopher grew up learning to work hard on the farm. At the age of fourteen he apprenticed to a shoemaker for three years and later worked at this craft for several years. At nineteen he married Sarah Davis, age seventeen, February 1828. They had a son. A few years later, they joined the Episcopal Methodist Church where Christopher became a class leader until 1837. In that year the sound of the Everlasting Gospel was brought to his hearing by two Mormon Elders. He and Sarah were baptized 27 July 1837. It did not take him long to determine to follow the principle of gathering. After settling his business, they started for Missouri to gather with the Saints. There were two other families anxious to leave for Missouri too, but as they were too poor to get there, Christopher and Sarah brought them with them. They found Missouri filled with angry mobs and were surrounded for weeks at a time by them. It was a dreadful time for the Latter-day Saints. Christopher was stopped and questioned at gunpoint several times. Christopher concluded that he should go to Far West. Bishop Buchanan told him of a cabin that they could use, but that night the mobs came and pulled the roof off of it. Later that night a storm came and they woke up to a foot of snow making it very uncomfortable. That morning, Christopher gathered up his horses, but couldn’t find his cow. While looking for it he saw two armed men approaching on horseback. He jumped into the creek bottom and they went by without seeing him. He and Sarah found another place to live --- with eleven people already there. More Saints came and wanted to stay with them. As there was very little food, they went to the fields and got some corn that had been left on the stalks, boiled it, grated it, and made bread with it for all to eat. A warning came that mobs were driving the Mormons out and plundering, so Christopher immediately rode to Far West to warn the people. That afternoon they saw the army coming upon them. Being unarmed, Christopher grabbed a pitchfork, and swung out with the others in two wings, the Prophet being at the head of the right wing. There were about 350 Mormons in all. A portion of the mob rode up to within a few hundred yards of them, halted, then scattered around like sheep, and then left. Later Christopher was thrown in company with one of the mobbers. He asked the guy why they had left so suddenly. He said that there were too many Mormons to fight. He claimed they saw ten thousand. That winter Christopher and another man killed 43 deer and shared the meat with the poor. Later, a neighbor named Sloan who was very poor, complained that he had no way to get to Quincy, Illinois, where the Saints were now going, as they were being driven out of Missouri. Christopher took pity on him and told him that he would help him get there if he would help pay expenses. The distance was over two hundred miles, and made in the dead of winter. Christopher received only three dollars and fifty cents. Some Saints began to establish themselves in Quincy. Finally, when the Prophet Joseph came out of Liberty Jail, he came to Quincy and called a conference there. Christopher observed the following events which occurred then. As the people were gathering at the camp meeting ground, a brother approached Joseph and dunned him for money. The Prophet asked him how he thought he could have money since he had just gotten out of jail. That did not stop the man. The debt was not the Prophet’s, but another’s who had bought land from this man in Missouri. Soon after the purchase, the Saints were driven out and had to leave everything behind! Yet, the man insisted on being paid. The Prophet told him that he had five dollars in his pocket and if four dollars would do him any good, he could have them. The man accepted. Brother Joseph took five silver dollars out of his pocket and gave him four of them, returning one to his own pocket. While Christopher continued walking around with the Prophet, a man came and told him a sister wanted to see him. Brother Joseph and Christopher went to see her. She was sick and her friends wanted her to return to the East where they would care for her. He asked her what she wanted to do, and she said she wanted to stay with the Saints. He took his last silver dollar out of his pocket and said, ‘Then stay, dear Sister, and God bless you.’ He then instructed the brethren not to let her suffer. At the close of the conference, the Prophet went to Commerce, later called Nauvoo. On his way he stopped at Christopher’s home to take dinner with them. Christopher asked him if he would like a little money. He said, ‘Yes, Brother Merkley, I am now on a journey of fifty miles, and I have not a dime in my pocket.’ Christopher gave him a sovereign (a gold coin worth about twenty dollars.) He took Christopher by the hand and blessed him and said, ‘Brother Merkley, may you never want.’ Christopher later said, ‘I never have.’ During their time in Nauvoo, Christopher went on four missions. On the first, to Ontario, Canada, seventy-two souls were baptized, and on the second, twenty-three. In Nauvoo, he was a member of the Nauvoo Legion, had homes at two locations in Nauvoo, and worked on the Nauvoo Temple. His wagon hauled the first load of dirt out of what would be the basement area for the temple. As he retuned from a mission, the rumors of the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum were confirmed. None of the Twelve were there then, having gone on to Iowa. Christopher stayed to continue working on the temple until it was done. He and Sarah had their temple work done in 1846 before he and his family left to join the Saints in Winter Quarters. Before he actually left the States, he purchased six panes of glass, a pair of hinges, and a lock for a door. He thought that if ever he could build a house in the West with so many pains of glass in it for light, and a door in it, he would be satisfied. When he got to Council Bluffs, the Indians stole his horses. He went right to the Omaha Indian Village, and through an interpreter told the Chief that he wanted his stolen horses back. The Chief said they had them, but had only borrowed them. He returned them to the ‘brave yellow-hair.’ While Christopher was at Winter Quarters, trying to get enough money to buy an outfit to go across the plains, he worked as the ferry-master at the ferry which crossed the Missouri River. He was in charge of boats taking both the Saints and gold-seekers across. The river was very high with a great deal of flood-wood passing down, making it very dangerous. He had narrow escapes when cattle became frightened and crowded to one side. But by Christopher’s ‘close watching and prompt action,’ they had no accidents. He began crossing the plains in July 1849, in the Enoch Reece Company. As he was known to be good at ferrying, he had the assignment to find the places to ford rivers and to build ferries for themselves and later companies. They had many cattle stampedes on their journey. As they passed Big Mountain and entered Salt Lake Valley on 3 October 1849, there was an early snow of over a foot deep to trudge through. When he started to build a house in Utah, (it was on First West and North Temple), he could not get enough lumber to finish it, so he built a whip saw, and by that means he gained sufficient lumber to finish. By the spring of 1851, he had finished, painted, and paid for his house --- with its pains of glass, door hinge and lock. While in Utah, he worked at many things. He had a store, sold real estate, bought some camera equipment in the East and learned the ambrotype business. He took pictures all over the West as he traveled in a house-on-wheels, a wagon he had outfitted to do that. He was an Indian scout, a shoe-maker, built a lumber mill, ran a cargo business, had a cattle ranch and a farm. However, he had some accidents with his arms and eventually became so crippled by them that he could not do hard manual labor afterwards. Nevertheless, through his example, all of his children learned that all honest work was worthwhile. He met and married Xarissa Fairbanks, as a plural wife, when he was fifty years old. In many ways, this was an act of compassion, as Xarissa, through what family members call “an unfortunate experience,” had a child, but no husband. She was only twenty years old. Not only Christopher, but Sarah, welcomed both Xarissa and her child. Christopher adopted the child, called Fanny, and had her sealed to them when he and Xarissa was married. Sarah was called Grandma by all of Xarissa’s children. Because of Sarah’s failing health, Xarissa did all the hard work, and Sarah tended the children. Xarissa had three sets of twins, as well as a single son. Early in 1864, Christopher was asked to move and to help settle southern Utah. He made preparations to leave all that he had built up. He had some of his household goods sent as far as Cedar City, when he went to ask Brigham Young where he wanted him to settle. He said that Christopher could choose any location in the St. George area. While talking with him, Brigham Young perceived that his arms were bad, and he asked Christopher if he could use them much. When Christopher admitted his problems, President Young released him for the call to relocate, for which Christopher thanked him. When polygamy became illegal, Xarissa and her children went to Bear Lake to live. Their oldest twin sons were eighteen years old and could manage a farm. Christopher came there to help for several years. He built a mill there too, though in 1884, it was destroyed by fire. He moved back to Salt Lake, where he was needed too. There, in spite of his crippled arms, he helped build the Salt Lake Temple, and later, the Logan temple as well. When he was seventy years old, he was called on his eighth mission, where he served again in Canada. After he returned to Salt Lake City, on February 6, 1887, a woman from Iowa who had traveled over a thousand miles came to have him baptize her. She had heard him preach when she was a girl. At that time, Christopher had baptized her sister and several members of her family. Now forty years later, she wanted the missionary she had heard preach the restored gospel to her family to do the baptism. She had been partially paralyzed on her left side for three years. She could not hold anything in her hand or play the organ. Christopher baptized her. Then he and her brother-in-law gave her a blessing that she would be restored to health. She was so far restored that she sat down and played the organ. She could also hold a pin and could feel it, which she had been unable to do for a long time. When Christopher was 86 years old, and Sarah 83, the capstone of the Salt Lake Temple was dedicated. It was a cold spring day, 6 April 1893, a full year before the Temple itself was dedicated. Christopher went to take part in the dedication and was chilled, and developed pneumonia. Sarah was also very sick at the time, and not expected to live. When he died on 3 May, 1893, his body was held for two days, until she died. A funeral was held for both of them and they were buried in one grave in Salt Lake City. Christopher wrote his own autobiography before his death. He closed it with this final testimony. “I am now drawing near the sear and yellow leaf, being seventy-nine years old …. I am still hale and hearty, and do not allow any young man to walk past me on the street. I have filled eight missions and baptized eighty-five persons….I have always paid my tithing from the days I was in Nauvoo….And now I am watching the events transpiring in these last days in fulfillment of ancient prophecy and of the words of the Savior as well as the prophecies of the Prophet Joseph Smith….” Surely he was among those who had been “True to the Faith.”
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Merkley
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Ester Maria Bubb Shirley Origin of the Bubbs They were of Dutch decent. Ester Maria Bubb was born July 7, sometime between 1830-5, at Port Elizabeth, South Africa. She was the daughter of George Bubb and Ester Schultz. Their parents had gone to Africa in 1830 to colonize South Africa. Ester’s father was a whaler at one time, and he had caught a whale the night she was born. On account of the very hot weather of that country, the men would get up very early in the morning and work and then rest during the day, and Ester and her sister, Martha, would always have to serve them coffee and hot cakes at ten o’clock every morning, and then tea during the afternoon besides the regular three meals. Their parents had a man come to the farm to teach the children, but the natives went on the war path, so they had to leave the farm for awhile and seek safety, and after that they didn’t have a chance to attend school. Their mother had fourteen children who grew to adulthood and two others who died when they were small. Pet Monkeys (Told by Maria Bubb to Fred Shirley) The Bubbs lived near the jungle in South Africa where there were lots of monkeys. Some times the boys would capture them for pets, using a special trick. They would take a small pumpkin and hollow it out, leaving a very small hole. Then they placed some seeds inside the pumpkin, which the monkeys really liked. They would then secure the pumpkin so the monkeys could not carry it away, and they would wait for the monkeys to come. Sure enough, one would always show up. Each monkey would be so anxious to get as many seeds as possible, it would take a lot of them in its fist. But then the fist would be too large to pull out of the hole Even though it would see the boys, who came to capture it, the monkey would not let go of the seeds, because it was so greedy. So, the boys could always capture it. When the boys captured the monkey, they would chain it to a tall post where they had built a small suitable house for the monkey on top. A large ring was slipped around this pole to which was fastened the small chain which held the monkey captive. This allowed him to run around for a great distance on the ground, and also to scamper up to the top of the pole and into his house. In this manner the monkey could be watched, fed, and enjoyed as a pet. And the monkey seemed happy too. One day, their pet monkey captured a young grown-up chicken. He was delighted with his conquest, and raced immediately up to the top of the pole and into his house with the chicken in its’ mouth. There the monkey very carefully and meticulously began to groom and pick off the lice on that chicken. This is their normal behavior. The monkey really enjoyed doing this. After some time of this loving grooming, the monkey released the chicken -- unharmed. When the boys saw it, lo and behold, right before their eyes, stood the chicken “plucked and naked“ -- not a feather left on it. Hunting Lions There were lions in the jungle near where the Bubbs lived. They said that the lions would roam in the jungles during the day and at night would come inland near the farms where there were water holes. Anyone who was interested in hunting the lions, which included the Bubbs, would listen for them in the night to learn where they settled down. Then, in the early morning hours, while the lions were still asleep, the hunters would take their rifles and go to shoot them. They felt they were a threat to their livestock. Maria raised in town Ester Bubb made butter on their farm at Bitenhage and kept each churning in brine till the next churning, then packed it in on the first churnings and put the brine on again. Then they would go into town to sell it. One of the boys would walk and drive the oxen while the mother sat inside and knitted for her family. One time when she went into Port Elizabeth and sold their farm products at Mr. Streak’s, his wife asked her mother if she wouldn’t let one of her children stay with her, as she had no children and Mrs. Bubb had many. It was decided Maria could live with the Streak family at Port Elizabeth. She had an upstairs room and could reach out the window and pick an orange anytime. So, when Maria was nine years old she went to Utinhage and lived with Mr. and Mrs. Streak until she was married. They were very wealthy people and had a nice home and very large flower garden. They had a gardener who spent all of his time just taking care of the flowers. Mrs. Streak was very strict, although she was very kind and treated Maria as her own daughter. There are more than one story of the developing relationship between Maria and William Shirley. They are probably all correct. One is that the Shirley brothers, William and Thomas, lived near the Streaks and found a sneaky way to get apples from their apple tree. Maria and her sister, Martha, who undoubtedly visited her often, caught the culprits, which developed into a friendship. Maria was always full of fun, and when she was sorting oranges in an upstairs room, she would throw the spoiled oranges out the window at some of the boys who were passing by, but when William came along, he would get a good one. When much older, Maria had William Henry as her Sunday School teacher. It was here that their love for each other was finally cemented. Mr. Streak always locked his gate at nine o’clock every night so when William came courting, she would be on one side of the gate and he on the other. Finally, he was granted the privilege to come into the parlor and see Maria while Mr. and Mrs. Streak were there. At nine o’clock he had prayers with the family and was to leave. One night he decided to climb over the fence and meet Maria on the porch. The dog decided to go into action. William ran for the fence and the dog got hold of his pants. He soon asked if he could marry Maria. Mrs. Streak furnished her wedding dress and they were married in the Streak parlor by the Reverend. Their first baby died about a month after it was born Maria’s sister, Martha, married William’s brother, Thomas, and for a time the four of them lived in the same house in Utinhage together. In fact, the two sisters and brothers were always together. William Henry was a wagon maker and his brother a blacksmith. The two couples used to walk down to the ocean beach in the afternoons. At some time, the chief of one of the African tribes told his people if they would kill all their cattle and bury them, their God would raise up ten for each killed. This resulted in a famine amongst the natives, so the English Government asked the white settlers to take the natives in as servants and feed them. Maria and William Henry got a Kefir girl called Kobosie, and Thomas and Martha took a Kefir boy. Kabosie helped both Maria and Martha, and they became very attached to her. A friend of theirs also had a native girl, and these two girls would visit each other. They wanted to look like their mistresses, so one day they dressed them up in some of their old clothes and the native girls went for a walk. It wasn’t long until they were seen going down the street of the city of Utinhage carrying their corsets over their arms and their shoes and stockings in their hands. Obviously, they found these “white man’s clothes” much too uncomfortable. The first LDS missionaries to South Africa were Jessie Haven, Leonard Smith, and William Walker. William heard the Mormon elders and soon was convinced they had a better religion and was convinced of the truth. He asked Maria to listen to the elders but she did not want to hear them. She had a dream one night that she went up to the spring for a pail of water. As she returned, a man met her and offered her a book which she refused. He took his handkerchief from his pocket and wiped the dust from his shoes and said to her, “I do this as a testimony against you.” Sometime later she was sick and the elders came to their home. She knew one of the elders as the man she had dreamed of and who had offered her the book she had rejected. In April 1855 Maria embraced the gospel and was baptized by Elder Leonard I. Smith; William had been baptized previously. After she joined the church, her parents became very bitter about it. One brother threatened William’s life. So eventually, in March 1859, Maria and William and a new infant son, Thomas, set sail for America to join the saints. Mother Bubb walked some distance with Maria as she left for America. As she bade her goodbye she said, “Now Maria you are as good as dead to me.” They sailed from Capetown on the ship Alacrity. It took them three months to cross the ocean. They landed safely at Boston, Mass. The Alacrity went back to Africa and the following year Thomas Shirley and Martha Bubb Shirley had accepted the gospel and sailed on the same ship via Gulf of Mexico and New Orleans. . William and Maria had arrived in Boston and immediately proceeded to Council Bluffs where they joined a company of Saints and started for Salt Lake City. Maria walked most of the way and carried her baby. William Henry had helped outfit a wagon in connection with a friend, and the belongings of the two families were loaded in the wagon. William had made a bed for Thomas in the back of the wagon, but because the friend objected to the “bawling” baby, Maria took him out and walked, carrying the baby, all the rest of the way. It took them three months to cross the plains, arriving in Salt Lake City, September 16, 1859. The baby was nine months old when they arrived. Their new life was to be much harsher. They had never seen snow until that first winter in Salt Lake, and she wondered how they could live in such a place. She had brought some beautiful silk dresses and shawls with her from South Africa, but during a first year she had to give them up as trade for flour and the necessities of life. Then, she was left a widow when her husband died in 1886, but she struggled on, with her three sons. She went bravely forward to make a home and establish her children among the Saints of God. She was very devoted to the church and would spend some time every Sunday morning reading the Bible, the Book of Mormon, or other church works. She had a very loving and gentle disposition and had many friends, both old and young. She was a very good seamstress, and spent a lot of time sewing for other people, making fancy quilts, burial and temple clothes. She also liked to make rag dolls or doll dresses for the children. After her son, Amos, married and moved to Salem, Idaho, she made several visits to see them, eventually by train. From those visits, one of her granddaughters described her as a small woman who was always neatly dressed. She had really dark eyes, almost black. She was very friendly and sociable. She loved to tell James about all his friends and other things back in his former home of Fish Haven. When she wasn’t working, her hands were always folded in her lap, and she had a habit of twirling her thumbs around each other. On one visit, her son took her on a tour of the new sugar factory in Sugar City. She died March 1, 1925 and is buried in Fish Haven, Idaho. Sarah Frances Shirley later wrote of her grandmother Maria and of her great aunt, Martha, Maria’s sister. “Although these two women suffered many trials, tribulations, and hardships, they remained true to the faith and were always ready and willing to acknowledge the hand of the Lord in all things. May their descendants follow the example set by these noble women.”
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Shirley
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of George Thompston Virgin George Thompston Virgin was the first of our ancestors on the Shirley line to accept the gospel. He was married to Mary Ann Barker on September 19, 1852. They lived in Marston, Bedfordshire, England. George had actually been working in a church in England. George accepted the gospel first, and asked Mary Ann to go and hear the elders. Mary Ann was satisfied with her church, but she did have some unanswered questions. George told her, “You go visit the cottage meetings and I think they can explain these questions. She came to accept the gospel too. When they joined the Mormon Church, the ministers had him discharged from his work there. And they were severely persecuted thereafter. They had to begin walking down the middle of the streets because the contents of vessels were dumped from bedroom windows and were poured on them if they walked along the sidewalks. After his dismissal from the church work, George went to work in Birmingham where he was put to work on the railroad, in a tunnel. There was a double track. One night as he was working in the tunnel, the train came along and passed him. When he unsuspectingly heard one coming again, there were no lights coming, so he stepped back on the track where the train had just passed. They had turned off the lights of the train on this track, and backed back along the track. He was injured and died soon after. Grandmother never saw him again. He lived long enough to verify that there were no lights and no signals of warning given to him. [His family long believed that the death was not accidental.] He died 30 December 1861. He was buried in Birmingham, England. He and his wife had four children: Amos Moses, Nephi Charles, Heber George. He never got to see his infant daughter, Mercy Ann, as she was born soon after George died. While his life was shortened by this tragic death, he left a testimony of the gospel through his willingness to give up everything and endure persecution for the sake of the gospel.
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Virgin
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Henry Mower, Sr. Henry Mower Sr. was born December 18, 1798, at Frederick, Maryland. He was a son of Michael and Catherine Heisinger (or Geisinger) Mower. When Henry was about two years old, his father moved to Clearfield, Pennsylvania, where his childhood and youth was spent. He received the best schooling possible at that time, which of course was quite limited, as he had to assist his father in making a living. Very early in life he met a beautiful young lady, named Mary Amick, who he married when he was only seventeen. Ten children were born to them, including Henry Jr., who is our ancestor. Henry’s father, Michael, was a wagon maker. Henry enjoyed helping him, and later he worked in a grist mill. From early childhood he was religiously inclined and joined the Methodist Church. He studied for the ministry and became a Methodist Preacher, but it seemed to him that there was something lacking with this religion. He was seeking something he didn’t have. He then came in contact with the Campbellites. He believed they were more nearly right, so he resigned his position as a Methodist Preacher, joined the Campbellites, and became a Campbellite preacher, which had been organized by Sydney Rigdon, Alexander Campbell, and Walter Scott. While Henry was laboring as a Campbellite preacher, a Mormon Elder by the name of William Boweley (or Bowerly) came to see him and asked for permission to preach in his church. Henry told him he might use his pulpit and his congregation. [What an amazing response!] A large crowd greeted the elder with much curiosity. They listened intently to the sermon and wondered what Henry would say at the close. Imagine their surprise when their pastor arose and bore his testimony to the truthfulness of what they had heard! Henry invited the elders to his home and from them he and his family learned more of the beauties of this glorious new gospel --- just restored. An undying testimony of the truthfulness of it was given to him and he applied for baptism. He resigned his position as a Campbellite preacher, and the day he was baptized, many of his former congregation walked twenty-one miles to see his immersion. They surely felt bad to think that their minister had been so misled. His family also joined the Church, and they were very desirous of being nearer the main body of the Church. So with all his family, except one daughter, they moved to within four miles of Springfield, Illinois. His home was always the home of the elders and all he could do was cheerfully done to advance the work of the Lord. From Springfield he soon moved to Iowa, just opposite Nauvoo. While living there he was called on a mission to the Eastern States. He and his companion became wonderful friends, and had greet success. Henry had the privilege of baptizing many into the Church. When he returned from his mission, he moved his family to Council Bluffs, Iowa. (Then known as Kanesville.) His beloved wife, Mary, had endured so many hardships of the pioneer life, it seemed she could stand no more. She became very ill. All that loving hands could do was done for her, but she rapidly grew worse and passed away at the age of forty-eight, leaving her husband her ten children to mourn her loss. Henry missed his companion very much. She had been a great source of inspiration and comfort to him in all the trying scenes they had passed through. They had been mobbed and persecuted so much for the gospel’s sake that nearly all their earthly possessions were gone. But our Heavenly Father did not forsake him. He sent another beautiful young lady into his life, Lucretia Hupper from Port Clyde, Knox County, Maine. She had accepted the gospel against the wishes of her parents, and she had left her home, a lonely girl, to cast her lot with the Saints. She was longing for loved ones who would be dear to her. These two met and it was love at first sight. They needed each other, but there were many things to be considered by Lucretia. Henry was much older than she was, having a daughter of her own age, and all his huge family of children she would have to mother, and his poor financial condition. She had been working and was quite well fixed. What should she do? Her heart told her. She loved Henry and they were married February 5, 1847. She thus became the stepmother of a lovely group of stepchildren. They came into her life when she need them most and she loved them very dearly as her own. At the time of her marriage her husband’s earthly possessions consisted of a small log room, a bedstead, a chest, three three legged stools, a rude table, and some bedding. Lucretia had plenty of clothing and cut much of it up to make clothing for the children. At Kanesville, Iowa, her first child was born -- a little girl who died within the year. Later a baby boy was born to them and they named him Orson Hyde Mower. Their home was happy with the consolation after their loss. They later had other children in Utah Henry was a trusted friend of the prophet Joseph Smith, and oh, how Henry loved him! Henry was away from home on another mission at the time of the martyrdom. And although they knew nothing of the terrible tragedy at the time, a terrible feeling of gloom came over them which they could not cast off, and when the word came to them of the sad news, they were almost heartbroken to lose both their prophet and their patriarch. Henry suffered all the hardships of the early Saints, but he was never heard to complain, and he was happy to be numbered with the Saints of God. When the great march to the West began, he made preparations for the journey, leaving in June, 1851. They came in Abraham Day’s Company. On the way, one of his horses died, and he had to use his cows to pull the wagon. He first settled with his family in Salt Lake City, but soon moved to Ogden. He lived there until the time of the move south in 1858, when Johnston’s Army came. At that time, the Saints, thinking they had finally found peace, were asked once again to give up all and move south, destroying what they had built, so their enemies could not gain from it. Henry obeyed the counsel of Brigham Young, “I have told you that if there is any man or woman that is not willing to destroy anything and everything of their property that would be of use to the enemy if left, I wanted them to go out of the territory and I say so today. For, when the time comes to burn and lay waste our improvements, if any man undertake to shield his, he will be sheared down, for judgment will be laid to the line and righteousness to the plummet. Now the faint-hearted can go in peace; but should that time come, they must not interfere. Before I will suffer what I have in times gone by, there shall not be one building, nor one foot of lumber, nor a stick, nor a tree, nor a particle of grass and hay that will burn, left in the reach of our enemies. I am sworn, if driven to the extremity, to utterly lay waste to this land, in the name of Israel’s God, and our enemies shall find it as barren as when we came here.” (Brigham Young, 1858.) According to the Deseret News, May 10, 1858, “The people from the north [of the Utah settlement] are all moving south. The roads are lined from Box Elder to Provo with horse, mule, or ox teams and cattle, and sheep.” Henry moved his family to Springville, where they made their permanent home. In time, he took a plural wife. After their move to Springville Henry became one of the town’s prominent men, serving in the city council. Henry was scrupulously honest, and at his death, April 4, 1878, no one was ever found who said he owed them a penny. He believed in living within his means and was economical, industrious, and generous, and would gladly share his last morsel with anyone in need. He was an able teacher, both by example and precept, of that Gospel that was dearer to him than all else. Henry had a long, useful, prosperous, and happy life, and it was said of him at his funeral, “He had thousands of friends and no enemies.” His wife Lucretia, wrote this poem after his death. “He’s gone, I do not mourn him. Life’s fleeting dream is o’er. He’s gone to meet his loved ones Upon the other shore. His pilgrimage is ended, His earthly sorrows past. By angels hands attended, He has gained his home at last.”
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Mower
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of James Frederick Shirley James Frederick Shirley was born July 13, 1873, in Mill Creek, Salt Lake City, Utah. When he was twelve years old, [1885] his family moved to Fish Haven, Bear Lake, Idaho, where they settled permanently and built a home on the shores of beautiful Bear Lake. They had a family of seven sons, though four died when young. James’ father, William Henry, a wagon maker in South Africa, was now a painter, and traveled to Montpelier, ID, each week for work. While there he became very ill and returned to Fish Haven. He died September 27, 1886, of painters consumption. James’ mother, left a widow, struggled on with the assistance of her three sons, Thomas, Charles and James. James was a talented musician. In Fish Haven, he played the organ for church and also for dances. Much later, he was also made the organist in his ward in Idaho. In Fish Haven, he belonged to the “Fish Haven Band,” and could play either the bass horn or the snare drum. Later, in Idaho, he belonged to the Salem Silver Band and played the bass horn. In Bear Lake area, quite often they would go to the different towns to play for celebrations or rallies. They went in a fancy wagon, which was called The Band Wagon. During the winter, the young people would go back and forth from Fish Haven to St. Charles in their sleighs, for dances. It was about the last dance of the season in Fish Haven that Sarah Virgin came with a group of young people from St. Charles. They began to dance a square dance. One more couple was needed to complete the set, so a boy from St. Charles asked Sarah to dance with him. When they joined the set, a friend of Sarah’s was dancing with James Shirley, and she introduced Sarah to him. James and Sarah started going together on New Years Day, and after a courtship of two years, they were married in the Logan Temple, 21 October, 1896. Two years later, when their son, Frederick Amos was a year old, they moved to Salem, Idaho, an undeveloped area in the Snake River Valley, in October, 1898. They moved into a two room log house. It had a dirt roof. James immediately busied himself building fences, repairing sheds, etc. The house was crudely built. So, James made a table, flour bin and cupboard to help furnish the small kitchen. The cupboard reached nearly to the ceiling to save room space. Many of his sons later became professional carpenters. As soon as the first winter’s snow was gone, James began to plow. He plowed and planted about 26 acres in about four weeks, besides ditching, fencing and a great many more spring jobs. They had begun to sink their roots into the Idaho soil. Early one morning in September, 1899, James left with a group of neighbors for the forest to get wood for fuel for the second winter, and to build a barn. The roads were bad, and it was a long distance from home. They went through “Calamity” [a pass], and into the timber. One night as they were cutting wood, James had the impression that he should be at home with his wife. But it was dangerous to go over “Calamity” at night, and the others made him wait until the next morning. He returned immediately to find a baby girl had been born the night before. Everything was okay due to help of others. The couple eventually had eleven children altogether. This oldest daughter, Myrtle, said her father was a kind, affectionate man, and had many friends because of his great sense of humor and his optimism. As a hard working farmer, he wore colorful work shirts under his bibbed overalls. Sometimes in the summer he wore a hat with a circle of mosquito netting around it to keep the gnats and mosquitoes off his face, as he held the lines and drove the horses with one hand and regulated the mowing machine with the other. From early spring until late in the fall, James worked hard to make a living for his family. The lower part of his sixty acre farm was used for pasture for the farm animals. He planted acres of alfalfa, wheat, oats and potatoes and all the plowing and farm work was done by horse power, at first. They planted trees, and eventually, on the East side of the house and directly in front of the door, was a large fruit orchard. They had pears, plums, and several kinds of apples. While Sarah bottled fruit, James also stored many boxes of them in a cellar back of the house. Also stored in the cellar were potatoes, squash, carrots and other vegetables. The family also planted and harvested gooseberries, raspberries, currants. While a lot of work, they all enjoyed the luscious fresh fruits. James’ face was always clean shaven and his brown hair was slightly parted on the left side. On Sunday, he made his family proud as he dressed neatly in his suit and white shirt. He was a man of great faith, and was often called into homes to administer to the sick. He administered to his family too, and they were blessed because of it, particularly during the 1918 flu epidemic. Once his daughter, Bonnie, broke her arm. The Dr. did not do a good job of setting it. But James administered to her, and the pain ceased immediately. He was faithful in accepting callings in the church and in filling them. He set a good example for his children to follow, by attending all his church meetings. Another very sobering experience showed that he had and followed spiritual impressions. There was an evening when Sarah was alone with her family. James was not expected back for the night. In the middle of the night, when everyone was asleep, Sarah heard something outside. She arose, and went quietly to a peepout hole they had. Then she went back and got their 22 rifle. A daughter awoke. She too heard steps and movement out at the barn. Sarah moved quietly toward the door with the gun. The footsteps outside stopped just prior to walking onto the porch. A voice said softly, “Are you awake, Mother?” Sarah dropped the gun to her side and called, “Jim! Jim!” When the door was unlocked, and James saw the gun, he and Sarah both began to cry. If he had not sensed that his wife was awake inside and called to her, she probably would have shot him, thinking he was a prowler, and causing a terrible tragedy. In time, threshing machines were invented, and the first use of it was a very memorable time. Grain had been cut, bundled and put in stacks All the relatives and neighbors came together and helped each other, all going from one farm to another until everyone’s grain was threshed out of the stalks. The machine was powered by a steam engine that belched out lots of black smoke. The men threw the grain into a “separator,” which beat the stalks, blew away the chaff, and then sent the grain through a long tube into sacks. Someone sewed up the sacks. All the men soon became covered with dust. The children had lots of fun, daring each other to stand under the blower of the chaff, until they were covered with beaten-up straw. When the thrashing was all done, they loved to climb up to the top of the straw stack, and slide down and frolic in the stuff. While the men were threshing, the women prepared to feed the men. They also worked together. They often had to borrow dishes and cooking utensils from each other to take care of the big crew of men. After threshing season was over, James and other family members went up into the timber to cut firewood for the winter. Again, they worked together, so they could have their wagons loaded with logs and return in three or four days. Much later, mines opened, and they made similar trips to them to obtain coal. In June, 1907, James was sustained and set apart as second counselor to the bishop of the Salem Ward. This was an added responsibility for him, and a long distance to travel, to attend all his meetings, bishop’s meetings, and calling on the members of the ward, to collect and raise funds, for a new Rock Meeting House, which was near completion. Having six children by 1908, the family decided to move to a larger home in Salem itself, though they kept working the farm. Sarah wrote of this exciting event: “January 1st, 1909, a warm day for winter. We all went over to Father’s for awhile and James played on a piano. Then we hooked up the team, and part of the families went for a sleigh ride. Then we went to the new house and made a fire, then we let the children stay there and enjoy themselves while we adults and the small children went to visit relatives and spend the evening. … January 8th, 9th, we went up to the house and started to paper the rooms. On Jan 13th we took a few necessaries and the family and went to the Townsite house to live. Then James brought more furniture, the chickens and cattle.” While they had the farm to raise crops, here at the townsite, they had milk cows, chickens, pigs, cattle and horses. From the chickens, pigs and cattle, they obtained their meats. The house was made of lumber, not logs, and painted green. It had three rooms and a back kitchen; later James added another big room, which made five. There was a large living room with a coal heater. The children gathered around a large, round table to do their homework. There was still no inside plumbing, no electricity. Along with the green house, a cellar and sheds, the family got a surprise, thrown in for free, which became a permanent possession for all to enjoy. Myrtle relates: A flock of sparrows had laid claim to a row of box elder trees that grew on the West side of the house and across the large front lawn. They seemed to be year around residents, migrating to barns and other shelter for the winter months, but returning to the trees early in the spring. By late June and throughout the remainder of the summer, they were well established in their old roosting ground. Each morning, at the crack of dawn, we were awakened, first by a twittering sound from the trees, this was followed by occasional chirps, from the early risers, as they tuned their voices, and made ready to sing in the morning songfest. Within minutes they all burst out in unrestrained volume and rhythm. Their songs vibrated through the still morning air. They sang every song they ever knew from the Sparrow Song Book, and ended up with the Hallelujah Chorus, sung in their own language and arrangement. As the sun rose higher, in the Eastern sky, their music stopped, almost as abruptly as it started, except for a few stragglers, who concluded with the last and final “Amen” and “Amen.” We learned to adjust our nervous system to this daily serenade, and the louder they sang, the harder we slept. Five more children were born in the green house. While they enjoyed having a house in the townsite, nearer to school and church, it meant they would have to travel out to the farm to keep it going. Each spring, the work began. Crops were planted, watered, harvested. Each family member had a job to do. The older brothers would work during the day on the farm, and in the evening feed and milk the cows at the townsite. The girls would go out in fruit season and pick the fruit and berries, then bring them back to process them as needed. Younger children did such things as filling the large reservoir built on the side of their stove with water, carrying in coal and kindling from the wood shed, and feeding chickens and gathering eggs, etc. Mother and oldest daughter baked eight loaves of bread at a time to feed their family. They also planted, cared for, and enjoyed a large garden. They delighted in Christmas. One Christmas, the children were awakened very early Christmas morning by a mysterious voice, with a German accent, singing, “I come ven you all were fast asleep, your stocking jest to fill. Down by the chimney slowly creep, so noiselessly and still.” All bedlam broke loose as shirt tailed clad kids popped out of every bedroom door. With surprised looks and wonder they gathered to find a tall, Edison phonograph in their living room, and listened in delight to the rest of the song being played on the record. James and Sarah laughed because for once they had really surprised the children with a gift which they had not found ahead of time. They had hid it at a neighbors, and brought it across the fields earlier in the morning. All the family loved this special gift with its opportunity to hear wonderful music, and this special Christmas. After the sugar factory was built in Sugar City, James sometimes worked there for extra money. In 1913, with the growing needs of his family, James decided to get more property to farm. He obtained previously undeveloped land, which meant a lot of work. It was 25 to 30 miles away. It was covered entirely with sage brush and lava rocks. They had to remove all of those obstacles, then plant. The wheat, unfortunately did not do well, and they were eventually forced to give up this project. They were there long enough, however, to find an old cave where there were stalactites and stalagmites. For a time they also sent herds of cattle to a valley in distant mountain lands during the summer where they could graze on grass. Those who cared for the cattle stayed there with them most of the summer. One uncle wrote that while he was there, he decided one night to make some cookies. His mother had sent supplies, and recipes. He was making great progress on the cookie dough until he saw the words “1 cup of shortening.” He did not know what that was. He looked through all his ingredients and could not find anything named “shortening.” So, finally, he made up the rest of the recipe, then took a cup out of it, and threw it away. That is the only way he could figure how to “shorten” the recipe. James suffered terribly from hay fever all his life, which made his work as a farmer, very difficult. Family members said he would usually come in at night so tired! He would sneeze, wipe his eyes, and cough. There was no medication then for it. He often tried to take other jobs to earn money which would take him away from farming, leaving the farming for his growing sons. In 1923, he worked cutting down trees and helping load them on the box cars of trains for a lumber company. In the spring of 1924, James and his son Leo went to Ogden, Utah, to work and earn extra money in the fruit harvest of a relative. James became sick. But he didn’t want to go to the doctor. He hoped he would get well and be all right, as usual. His sickness went on for several days, and when he did go to the Dr., the doctor couldn’t do anything for him. James’ appendix had ruptured, and peritonitis had set in. James died at the age of 51 on July 24, 1924. His son Leo was with him when he died. He began to feel resentment that his dad would be taken, leaving a widow with nine children. Then he had a special experience. He says, “I didn’t see him, nor did I hear him, but I know my father put his arm around me and said, ‘It’s going to be alright son. Things will be fine.’” Leo, who had been scheduled to go to school, now gave up that dream, and spent the next several years running the farm with his younger siblings. Oldest daughter, Myrtle pays tribute to her parents. “My parents tried in every possible way to make our home life a happy one and to give us the schooling and opportunities for growth they had missed in their lives, and to keep us active in the church. We were taught by example and at times it took some stern discipline to bend our wills in the right direction, and for this I will always be grateful.” Though dying relatively young, James left a great heritage for his children, who were blessed to have his beautiful example and teachings.
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Shirley
Paul Brown Life and Testimony of Jeannette Shirley Hadley Alice Jennette Shirley was born 15 March, 1908, in Sugar City, Idaho. She was “strong and healthy” at birth. Yet amazingly, after having eight children and living a physically challenging life until her late 70’s, it was found she was born with a hole in her heart. The hole was finally discovered by doctors puzzled by a large growth on one side of her heart when she was 78. Fearing it was cancer, they scanned her heart. The growth was a mass of muscle built up to help pump her blood in spite of the hole. Usually, children born with holes in their hearts need immediate heart repair in order to live. The doctors were amazed that she had lived with that hole throughout her life and had born eight children, which would ordinarily mean death to someone with a heart like hers. But more than one doctor, for more than one reason, spoke of Mother as a “wonder woman” or as “a walking miracle.” And she was in more ways than they knew! Her name: Mother did not like how her name was spelled. She felt it was too long. So, she told people to spell it “J a n e t,” though still calling it Jennette. When she was in college she tried to spell her name that way. But a professor told her that “J a n e t” does not spell Jennette. Some of her sisters still spell her name as “J a n e t.” Early Childhood: When little, Mother was quick and often slipped away from her mother to explore. They always had to keep an eye on her. One day, when Jennette was two or three, she slipped away and couldn’t be found. Her mother went up the ladder and peeked over the edge of the roof. There she was, eating apples that were spread out on sheets to dry in the sun.” Her mother had to coax her down with a bribe. Grandmother Shirley was proud of Jennette’s voice. Jennette loved to hear her own mother sing, especially “… do your duty with a heart full of song…” which had lasting impact on her. Later Childhood: Jennette’s family consisted of eleven children. They lived on a farm and had to work hard. Mother wasn’t always the most willing worker at first, though she later became a very tireless worker. She says as a child she remembers her father had to teach her to bring him a drink of water out to the fields without scowling and pouting. They raised hay, sugar beets, peas, potatoes, and had milking cows. She helped in the hay and beets, etc., and remembered later how they squished mud through their toes and threw clods at each other to break the monotony of hot, hard, work. There were children born after her, and she helped care for them. She was proud that her father sometimes called her, “Little Mother.” The family had a lot of fun together too. She loved playing Kick the Can. She also loved playing baseball and basketball. She and other family members loved acting in plays and family members helped with musicals in the area, even in forms of the opera. 1918 Flu: Jennette’s family caught the 1918 flu. This Flu killed a lot of people in the world. Relatives and neighbors helped them with nourishment. Priesthood blessings and this help from others kept them alive. The Terrible Crisis: While the family had escaped death during the flu, it came in other forms. Jennette’s father was in Utah when he was stricken with appendicitis, and died. The death was shocking. Jennette wrote how hard it was to accept that death. “I knew Father was in Heaven and that I’d never see him again. So I was completely unprepared when the casket arrived. I didn’t want to see him, or it. Aunt Gertha tried to drag me. I hung onto the bedroom doorknob until Mother said, ‘Leave her alone. She needs some time.’” When everyone was gone, I crept into the room. It was Father all right… It was the 24th of July and a fly was buzzing in the window. I went to dispose of it. Reality had finally come to me. Life had to go on.” But life did become much harder for them. Grandfather Shirley had left behind him a large family of eleven. Grandmother Shirley had to leave the home and go to work sorting seed peas at the local seed house to provide a living for the family. All the children had to work to keep things going at home. Jennette mixed bread at night, then left it in pans overnight; her brother Leo baked it in the morning before school. They had to put seven lunches together, which they put into empty lard (beef fat) pails. They fixed mostly egg sandwiches, or jam or honey sandwiches. (They did not have peanut butter.) Leslie, a brother, made the fire and put on a pot of cereal for their breakfasts. They had their own cows, chickens, and a garden. Mother writes, “Coming home from school I would run across the lawn, toss my books in the front door, run to the wood pile for wood or chips, go in the back door, start the fire and go into the bedroom to change clothes.” Jennette also helped get dinner by peeling potatoes or washing dishes.” One day she had to undertake the disgusting and challenging job of cleaning, degutting, and cutting up several chickens. While the death of their father was a great tragedy, it helped them learn to work hard, and together. Jennette wrote, “I think of our Mother, after Father died and think, ‘How in the world could she do it?’ She had to depend upon the Lord and her fine family; they had to stick together and take care of themselves. I do hope the Lord is as pleased with that as I am.” They had little money, so Jennette made her prom and graduation dresses. Her brother told her that she was a good dancer. Jennette served as the Senior Editor for her high school yearbook. She remembers after writing her report on the Senior Class, she could not find it. She knew she had put it in a safe place, but could not remember where. Finally, after crying and prayer, she found it in the sewing machine drawer. After graduation, she worked at a hot springs north of Sugar City. She earned a dollar a day and board. She became a very good swimmer, dived like a “professional,” and could “swing across the rings as easy as pie.” She felt her work was one great big holiday. By working at the Hot Springs in the summers, she earned enough money to pay for two years of college at Ricks. She even earned enough money to buy some clothes. She said, “One special date I borrowed Sarah’s beautiful red silk polka dot dress. I was the belle of the ball. Life does have its moments.” After two years of college, Mother and her sister Sarah were able to get jobs teaching --- in Landing, Idaho, above Rockland. Romance: While teaching, Mother met John and Amy Hadley, who were serving as Trustees of the school and helped the teachers a lot. After Christmas, she met their son, Leroy, who had just returned from a mission to Canada and northern parts of the U.S. They had a lot of fun that winter. Mother said she could write a book about it. Unfortunately, she didn’t. But she said, among other things, she and Sarah tried to ride skis behind Leroy’s horse. It took them two hours to go a mile. But they finally reached their destination --- his married sister’s place for popcorn. Of her engagement she writes, “Leroy and I were engaged on my birthday. We needed an extra chair from the school house. Leroy and I went over to get it. We paused for a moment and he gave me a nice long tender kiss, then he held me in his arms and said, “Will you be my wife?” I was surprised, but was ready with my answer. How could I be so sure? He liked Sarah too. But I had made up my mind I would say yes. So I simply said, “Yes.” Everyone was surprised but happy. They were married in the Salt Lake City Temple. All the family went out to Fred’s and Clara’s (Jennette’s married brother and his wife) to stay for the night --- including the newlyweds. While Leroy and Jennette were out walking in the yard, some of the others sewed up the sheets on their bed. Early Married Life: Jennette and Leroy married during the time of the Depression. And it was a very hard time financially. Mother writes, “We lived with the folks part of the time and at the dry farm part of the time. The dry farm (no irrigation available) was about six miles west of Leroy’s folks home. That house! That year! Leroy was going to fix it up for me. All they managed to do was tear the partition out and move it around so the wind wouldn’t blow through it. So we lived with a stove in the middle of the floor and no partition behind it.” In the summer sometimes a harmless snake would slither inside. Times really were hard. Leroy worked for his father for their food and clothes. They had little else. Eventually they rented a farm nearby and fixed up an old house that was on it. They had two sons by then; Mother took great precautions in the winters to keep them off the cold floors. But, Mother said, in spite of their poverty, “That winter was one of the most enjoyable winters we ever spent. Our enjoyment came from reading aloud good books together. We read the Church History through, the life of Heber C. Kimball, the life of Parley P. Pratt, and the book, Added Upon.” One night they got so involved in reading, Father forgot to go milk the cows. When he had to do so, he put his light in a milk pail, to make sure his father did not see him milking so late. Eventually they moved near Blackfoot, Idaho, where Leroy bought a farm. They had four children by then. “Leroy worked at everything he could find to do. He rented land beside the forty-acre farm. We thinned beets and in the winter he used to work at the Sugar Factory. Sometimes he’d haul beets until night, then work all night at the Sugar Factory. They bought a bigger farm. There was only a two-room house on it. There was no electricity, no trees. “It looked horrible,” Jennette says. But they felt it had prospects. They had six children by now, the older boys had to sleep in an old boxcar that was outside the yard. It had no heat, and was very cold. The folks attached a rope to a bell, and pulled the rope to ring the bell when it was time for the boys to get up for chores. They planted a lot of beets and began milking a good herd of cows too. Everyone who was old enough worked and worked hard. But everyone had a lot of fun too. Jennette writes, “After working in the beets all day we would take our food down to the Blackfoot River. We would build a bonfire and cook wieners and eat together.” They made good strong friends in the community, and they would get together with them for feasts and picnics too. A favorite outing for the family was to the mountains nearby for picnics of fried chicken, potato salad, fresh sliced tomatoes, corn on the cob, lemonade, homemade bread, and cake and/or cold watermelon. The family undertook building a better home. Leroy bought another small house, tore it down and moved the lumber over. In 1944, many great friends came to help them build onto the house. “We built two rooms and a bath on the east side of the house and extended the roof so it made a nice, big upstairs room. We did all the work ourselves with the aid of the community. Along in January it was time to move the roof over. A group of men came and they disjointed one half of the old roof at the top and sides and bottom. They slid it onto the new [portion[ we had built, secured it into place. [Then they built a center for the roof between the two older portions.] A day or two after we finished, it snowed. We were surely grateful [we had] a roof over us before winter fully set in.” There were other blessings of help from neighbors. Jennette tells, “On the 15th of March, on my birthday, a group of ladies surprised me by bringing in their dinner and coming ready to paper the inside of the house. We papered all three rooms. We really did work to get that house papered that day.” A Second Crisis: The winter of 1947 was filled with sickness: Arlin had rheumatic fever. Shirley, Lenet and Johnnie had mumps. Jennette took food into the bedroom for three months to some sick child. Unfortunately, Johnnie’s mumps masked a case of appendicitis. Before the more serious illness was discovered, it was too late, and Johnnie died of a ruptured appendix at the age of five. His death was a great shock and sorrow to his parents and family. To salve their sorrow, eventually Jennette and Leroy had two additional children, though Jennette was in her forties, making the total number of children eight. Every summer the family had big hay crews come. Jennette had to cook for a lot of men, and she had to do everything from scratch: chickens had to be killed, defeathered, disemboweled, cut up, then fried. New potatoes had to be dug out of the ground, then cooked. [They were often cooked with fresh peas, which had to be picked and shelled, then creamed. All cooking was done for years on a wood fire.] Lettuce, radishes, carrots were picked, washed and cut up for cooking and salads. Some kind of fresh bread was often baked. Cakes were made, and Jennette often made homemade ice cream. It was a tremendous amount of work. But it was all so fresh and delicious! One year, Leroy came in with his haying crew, and Jennette was not there. There was no food prepared. He was very upset, and tried to make some kind of meal, but obviously could provide little for very hungry and greatly disappointed men. They went back to work. A long time later, Jennette came. She too was very upset. She had gone early in the morning to pick some currants in the field with a neighbor. An old mean bull, on whom Father had put blinders to make him less dangerous, had rubbed them to the side so he could see, after all. The angry bull had kept Mother and her friend up in a tree for hours! The Children Grow Up: Around the time Lee and Susan were born, some of the older children were leaving home. Darrell went first to BYU, then on a mission, then into the Army. Arlin stayed and helped Leroy on the farm, and learned to fly. But then he too went on a mission. Shirley went to BYU. Another Move: The long, wind and snow-blowing winters wore greatly on Leroy. The year of 1956, just before Darrell came home from the Army and Arlin came off his mission, Father bought another farm in Emmett, Idaho, a milder climate. Leroy, Jennette, and Grandfather John E. Hadley went back to pick the boys up from the East Coast, and saw many special sites going and coming. Then the family moved to Emmett. By this time, Shirley had graduated from BYU and was teaching school in California. After they moved to Emmett, Douglas joined the Marines for a while, then went on a mission. 5 Children’s Marriages: The move to Emmett had significant influence. Both Darrell and Arlin found their wives from that area. Once the children started marrying, there was a steady stream of marriages. Shirley married first in 1956. Then Arlin married the next summer, 1957. Darrell married that same fall, 1957, and Lenet married the following winter, 1958. The Third Crisis: The winter of 1960 was a very difficult one for Jennette and Leroy. Jennette developed Hodgkins Disease. The x-rays showed one lung almost filled with fluid. Through radiation treatments they were able to handle the problems, for a time, but were told that she would only live for a few years. In addition, by that time, many family farms were in deep financial problems, and Dad’s was among them. They struggled both with the physical distress of her illness and the never ending worries of heavy farm debt. Douglas finished his mission, married, and they lived on the farm with Jennette and Leroy. This brought help and comfort to them. There was also Lee and Susan, who still lived at home, bringing them joy as well as continued family responsibility. The crisis worsened in 1964. While the disease had been put at bay for a time, it returned, and the family were told that Jennette had only a few months to live. The cancerous growth greatly enlarged her stomach; her arms and legs were starved and wasted. I visited my parents for a month, but then had to leave, as I had my own responsibilities at home. I grieved that my efforts to help had seemed so pitiful. I will never forget the moment at the airport when Mother turned away from me in grief and loneliness. She could not bear to say goodbye, for we were under the belief this “goodbye” would be until the Eternities. The Sunday after my return, our whole family fasted and knelt in prayer, that the doctor’s word, that she had only two more months to live, might not be realized. As we knelt, I felt a strong comfort in knowing that my brothers and sisters similarly knelt in their family groups, also fasting and praying for Mother’s life. Knowledge of the goodness of these family members and the strength of their faith in God, added to the desperate hope that we might be favorably heard. After our united petitions, Spencer Palmer, [for he and Shirley were present with Mother then,] laid his hands upon her head to give her a blessing. In spite of all the physical evidence, in spite of the professional pronouncements, he was prompted by the spirit to promise Mother that she would live to an old age! Mother’s acceptance of this blessing --- with faith, greatly impressed me. And the spirit which whispered promise through that blessing spoke truly. In spite of the fact that Hodgkins Disease was considered incurable, through a combination of difficult medical treatments and miracle, the tumor within her stomach was destroyed and health and vigor returned to her body. The medical treatments consisted of cobalt treatments to shrink the tumor in her stomach. After that they gave her hydrogen mustard gas in her veins. The doctors would come in their leather aprons, gloves and boots, because if they got some of that on them, it would kill them. These treatments were terribly, terribly hard on Mother. But through some miracle, they worked Mother’s health was restored, and she lived to enjoy the growth of all her many wonderful grandchildren. She saw many who were not even born yet, married. And she lived to see, experience, and enjoy many other wonderful things in her life. She did indeed live to an old age --- not passing away until 1987. Her life had been extended for twenty-three years. Even then, her death did not come from Hodgkins Disease, but from that hole in her heart with which she had been born, though a lymphoma for which she took chemotherapy for several years was a contributing factor. Once while visiting the doctor who treated her for Hodgkins, not LDS, she overheard him tell a nurse, “Here comes a walking miracle.” He knew it was not the medical technology alone which had saved her life from Hodgkins. However, there was still the other part of the crisis in their life that had to be overcome. They still struggled with overwhelming farm debt. Eventually, Leroy traded the farm for an apartment house in Boise, and he found a job. Jennette enjoyed the apartment house. She and Mary Lou went downtown often. They did not have any money to shop, but they went down to look. But Leroy was miserable in his job, and eventually bought a butcher shop in a place called Grandview. They and Lee and Susan moved out to Grandview to live, leaving Douglas and Mary Lou to run the apartment house. While the butcher shop too proved to be financially unsuccessful, it led them to a position which was perfect for them. Leroy eventually became Water Master for the farmers in Grandview. This allowed him work in the summer with enough income to support themselves, [Dad raised some calves on the side], and it gave them winters off where they could travel to visit their children and grandchildren. [I, Lenet, had reason to feel this several step set of circumstances was also a miracle, as I record in my Father‘s history.] The Fruitful Rewards: Jennette and Leroy had wonderful experiences in the latter part of their lives as they were blessed to visit and be visited by their families. These experiences are far too many to recount. I can only share some highlights, and will generally share more of those which relate to my own family. Their 50th Wedding Anniversary: Dad and Mother were rightfully honored for reaching their 50th anniversary as loving husband and wife. First there was a surprise party for them in Grandview. Then a big celebration in Provo. Not only the children, but many other members of their extended family came to honor them. There was a dinner at a special restaurant for them and their children and spouses. A special quilt was presented to them, under Shirley’s work and direction. We held a program, featuring slides of their lives. We had a picnic in the park, and later, many pictures taken at Darrell’s church, where he was bishop. Then there was an evening program in the church where the members of each family presented talents. I wrote and read a special tribute to them. The highlight, however, was the special sacrament and testimony meeting we held in Darrell’s house where all their children, spouses, and grandchildren [except three who were serving missions] gathered. Mother’s own account of the meeting follows: “Bishop Arlin Hadley took charge. Jim Peterson gave the opening prayer. Songs were sung (our family all have beautiful voices). It was such a thrill to me. Father and I sat where we could see everyone. The priests and deacons [all grandsons] prepared and passed the sacrament and the time was spent giving our testimonies. I can say this ‘It was a bit of Heaven here on earth.’ I cry with joy to think of it now. To hear each one of our families bear their testimonies in their own way, it was a most spiritual experience. I’m sure we felt the blessings of our heavenly Father there that day --- a part of His family. I hope He was pleased with us.” Mother was honored several times by groups in her wards. She wrote, “The Mutual girls voted for me to be their special guest on Wed., their mutual night. It was truly an honor for me. I wore my special white dress. And Wendy introduced me and gave a short story of my life. They pinned a corsage on me and gave me a big spontaneous hug.” Another time the Relief Society sisters honored her as “Queen for a Day” at a homemaking luncheon. On another occasion, she was honored for her art work, and especially for getting a lot of the sisters in Grandview interested in painting; she had taught them how. Jennette and Leroy loved visiting their family. Because we lived in many different areas, they came to visit us in North Carolina; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Indianapolis; and Florida. They made two trips to Indiana, enjoying the children, seeing the city, going shopping, having lunch out. They also enjoyed Family Home Evening where they told of their family lives in the early days. The children enjoyed hearing it. They came to the mutual talent show. Jennette wrote, “Tomi was a character from funny paper fame. She and her funny paper friend flashed on and off the stage for funny quips and predicaments. She was well heard and distinct. Jeff sang ‘MacNamaras Band.’ He sang with quickness and gusto. He even did a jig after. The audience really liked it.” A highlight was a trip to Brown County, which is famous for its colorful fall foliage. She wrote, “We stopped at a very colorful shop [brimming with colorful gourds and pumpkins, and other fall goodies] and bought some pumpkins for Thanksgiving, apples, etc. The autumn leaves were unbelievably pretty…We stopped and viewed beautiful sights and took some pictures that could never do justice to the coloring in the trees.” We also went to Washington D.C. They were going to meet Susan, flying down from New York with her boys, to go back with them to Utah. And they really wanted to see the Washington D.C temple. They had heard so much about it. We even did a couple of sessions. Mother found the grounds especially beautiful, and everything so peaceful. After we moved to Gainesville, Florida, they came to visit us there too. They really enjoyed their flight out. Mother wrote, “Again we felt loved and were escorted home. The weather is pleasant and lovely, and the country is beautiful. The children greeted us at home. Brave Tomi and laughing Jeff and David with knowing brown eyes.” [John and Richard were both on their missions then.] Dad went to a Florida football. Mother stayed home, relaxed and “enjoyed the lovely home and pleasant surroundings.” They enjoyed their visit to the Millhopper, an interesting old sinkhole, with stairs going down deep into it, where there is wonderful tropical foliage. Jennette particularly enjoyed a day visiting Silver Springs: a ride in a glass bottom boat over a natural springs full of fish, with birds in the trees alongside. Took another ride where we saw jungle animals and monkeys. “We walked down to the Deer Park and saw deer, cute and fat goats and llamas.” Mostly they enjoyed being with the family and doing things with them -- She commented how special it was, reading the Book of Mormon and prayer. They had Thanksgiving with us. The day after we all went to Disney World. I stayed with mother and we did slower, quieter things, letting the others go for more thrilling experiences. Mother said, “We went home weary but well fed on fun and extravagant things to do and see.” From Florida Mother and Dad went on to New York to help Susan with the birth of their third child. One Christmas, when John, Richard and Tomi were all at BYU, we flew to Provo for Christmas. Shirley and Spencer went to California for the Holiday Bowl, so they let us stay in their house. Mother and Father drove up and joined us there. Mother wrote, “We took over at the house. The boys and Tomi moved in too. And they were so happy to be together. They were just fun to be around. They went skiing three days. [We had a great time laughing at the funny things that happened as all these first time skiers, with inadequate ski clothes, had hilarious experiences.] The holidays were a huge success.” Mother’s Final Years: Jennette developed lymphoma. It had grown into her spleen and liver before discovered. Mother took intermittent chemotherapy for several years. The medicines she took always caused her heart to give her a lot of trouble. She grew increasingly tired and sometimes discouraged. Father retired from being Water Master. Some in the family tried to talk them into moving to Utah, but they liked the weather and the less traffic in Idaho. They bought a very nice lot in Boise for their mobile home where they could fully retire and spend their final years working in the temple. The lot was very nice with lots of grass; Mother planted a lot of flowers; roses surrounded the lot. They planted some of the pine trees. She liked being closer to town. The long drive to Grandview had grown hard on her. The time came for grandchildren to begin marrying. We went to Provo one spring to meet John’s and Richard’s fiances. Father and Mother came to Provo and met them too. Mother wrote, “We had so much fun sitting on blankets and wrapped up all in a big bunch. [At a BYU Baseball game]. It was a delightful time to all be together.” We went to Shirley’s for potluck dinner Sunday, watched a choir with Richard in it on T.V. Mother continued to have problems with her heart. One day she wrote, “My heart went crazy this morning but I lived through it. Its perfectly normal since then.” It worried her. The Dr. told Dad, “I would like to x-ray her heart. There is something wrong. But I don’t know what it is.” The e-rays showed the mass of muscle, and eventually the hole there. She had been born with it. Father heard the machine she was on. Instead of a “beat, beat”, there was a “swussh, swussh,’ because of the hole. Father said of her, “Jennette didn’t complain. One thing about her, she was very patient.” Her health continued to deteriorate. She was taken to the hospital for blood transfusions. She felt it was useless to continue to go, but Father could not keep from taking her. Mother also suffered from declining eyesight. For a long time, she could only see shapes around a black hole, which kept her from doing her beloved oil painting. One of the last entries in her journal, was that she suffered from “Eye ache!!! I can only see for awhile.” I went to visit her just before her death, and stayed with her. She told me that she was ready to pass beyond the veil. She was not afraid to do so, because she had not done anything she was ashamed of in her life. I felt it an honor to be with her and to help her make it through “The Second Passage” --- from this life into the next, just as she had brought all of her children through the veil from the pre-mortal existence into this life. It was actually a miracle I was able to go to be with her, because I was in school at the University of Florida then, taking classes. But there was just a long enough break at the right time, and an understanding professor, to be with her and to stay for the funeral. Mother was very concerned about her family and their spiritual welfare. She prepared her own “Last Testimony” which she recorded just before her death. She had it read at her funeral, urging all of her family to hearken to the commandments and to live good lives. She died in her sleep, peacefully on March, 6, 1987. At the viewing and funeral, there were many people who came who had not seen each other for a long time, so there was much greeting of loved ones. At first I was a little concerned whether these happy greetings took away from respect for Mother. But as I thought about her, I felt strongly she was doing the very same thing on the other side of the veil. I knew she was being greeted by her beloved Johnnie, and by her own dear loved Mother and Father, and sisters and brothers, and friends, and prophets, and the Christ!
Mar 24, 2007 · posted to the surname Hadley
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