Willie Barton

AncientFaces Member since Mar 08, 2003

About: married with 4 children. Researching Butler, Alexander, McCullar, Pruett, Barton, O'Rear, Banks.

Researching: Pruett, Barton, Alexander, Butler, Banks, Mccullar, O'Rear

Willie's Photos

Andrew Andrew and his sister, Leila, were children of James A. and Millie (Ferguson) Barton. They lived in Walker Co, Al.
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William Wallace b. Feb 2, 1839 Al. d. Jul 11, 1919 and is buried in Boldo Cemetery, Walker Co, Al. He married Nancy Elizabeth Harden Jul 23, 1861.
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Alred Carol Barton was son of William Wallace Barton and his wife, Nancy Elizabeth (Harden) Barton. He was born Oct 29, 1869 and died Feb 11, 1957. He is...
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Sons of Hiram Morrow and Sarah Elizabeth (Barton) Morrow.
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Frances Barton, daughter of Moses and Fannie Barton, of Walker County, married James Morrow. She is buried in Lamar County, Alabama.
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Emily Joella 'Jody' lived to be 100 years of age. She loved to go to church and loved to wear her fancy hats to church. She was a tiny woman, 5' 2" or so and...
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James Collins Pruett (son of Jacob Decatur & Annie Pruett) married Mary Vaughn. James was born Feb. 27, 1847 in Georgia, Mary was born June 1846 in Ga. They...
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no family information.
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William Albert Alexander and his wife, Dovie Butler Alexander with their daughter, DeGloais (Lois)
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Daughter of David C. and Exer Alexander. Married to Lacy Tubbs.
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Willie's Discussion Posts

Willie Barton After John Butler moved to Winston County, Alabama he wanted a nice family home with lots of fruit trees, mostly apple. There was a root cellar, the opening for it being in the back bedroom floor, where they kept their vegetables. John always said an appropriate blessing at every meal. You could tell if he was real tired or sick because he would shorten the blessing to a simple 'Lord, bless us in supper. Amen'. It was customary in those days to have a lot of church company. Since John raised his own tobacco he made his own twists to chew. Once after church 2 or 3 of the men were sitting around the fireplace and John passed around a twist for the men to cut them a chew. One preacher remarked, "Is this our pay for preaching?" whereupon John retorted, "Poor preaching today". Once when the Butlers had invited company for dinner and the meal was over, John had a plate piled high with backbones and potato peelings. His visitor had nothing left on his plate. The visitor said, 'You could always tell a workman by his chips' (Referring to that pile of bones on John's plate). John retorted, ' And you can tell a dog by how he licks his plate'. There was an old lady by the name of Beasley that attended Old Enon Church with the Butlers. She always carried a little down purse (they were called satchels in those days). When the spirit lifted her during church service she would say to her husband, 'Oh, Mr. Beasley, hold my satchel while I shout'. That expression became a by-word to use when anyone in the Butler family was real happy. John wanted everything fixed up and nice looking. He was jolly, full of fun and friendly. They kept an 'oven' in the fireplace filled with baked sweet potatoes. If people were passing by, John would yell to them to stop awhile and 'come in and get you a tater'. They would stop and visit and eat potatoes by the fire. John was a staunch Primitive Baptist and spent his last days preparing for a 'three days' meeting at Old Enon Church. He died in Sept 1909.
Mar 08, 2003 · posted to the surname Butler