Joyce Ann Lewis (1933 - 1965)

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Joyce Ann Lewis
1933 - 1965
Born
March 19, 1933
Death
June 12, 1965
Summary
Joyce Ann Lewis was born on March 19, 1933. She died on June 12, 1965 at 32 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Joyce Ann Lewis
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Joyce Ann Lewis
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Joyce Lewis was born on
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Ft. Rosecrans National Cemetery Section A-B Site 1322 P.o. Box 6237, in San Diego, California 92166
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Branch of service: Us Navy
Rank attained: AT 1

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Joyce Ann Lewis died on June 12, 1965 at 32 years of age. She was buried in Ft. Rosecrans National Cemetery Section A-B Site 1322, San Diego, California. She was born on March 19, 1933. We have no information about Joyce's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Joyce's lifetime.

In 1933, in the year that Joyce Ann Lewis was born, on March 4th, Franklin Delano Roosevelt became the 32nd President of the United States. He was elected four times (equaled by no other President) and guided the United States through the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and World War 2. His wife was his cousin Eleanor Roosevelt (Teddy Roosevelt's niece) who President Truman called "First Lady of the World". Some of the major programs that survive from his presidency are the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Wagner Act (The National Labor Relations Act of 1935) , the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and Social Security.

In 1946, Joyce was just 13 years old when on July 4th, the Philippines gained independence from the United States. In 1964, Independence Day in the Philippines was moved from July 4th to June 12th at the insistence of nationalists and historians.

In 1947, when she was only 14 years old, on April 15th, Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, playing first base. He was the first black man to play in the Major Leagues. Since the 1880's, professional baseball had been segregated and blacks played in the "Negro leagues". He went on to play for 10 years.

In 1950, by the time she was 17 years old, in February, Joe McCarthy gave a speech alleging that he had a list of "members of the Communist Party and members of a spy ring" who worked in the State Department. He went on to chair a committee that investigated not only the State Department but also the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Army for communist spies - until he was condemned by the U.S. Senate in 1954.

In 1965, in the year of Joyce Ann Lewis's passing, on March 8th, the first US combat troops arrived in Vietnam. The 3500 Marines joined 23,000 "advisors" already in South Vietnam. By the end of the year, 190,000 American soldiers were in the country.

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