Philippine Insurrection

Browse the history of Philippine Insurrection through vintage photographs.

Going off to war: My grandfather Joe Albert Edmondson in 1899 being deployed to the Philillipine American War (Philippine Insurection).
People in this photo:
Unknown - Unknown
My Grandfather, Frank Triscik, a Slovak Immigrant, (1878- 1917) served in the US army in both the 4th and 21 Infantry from Oct. 1900 to Oct 1903. He spent 14 months in the Philippines during the Philippine Insurrection or Philippine War of Independence (1899–1902).
People in this photo:
1878 - 1917
3 soldiers of the 35th Inf Regiment American Volunteers, taking time to pose. The person in the middle is my gf, Humphrey P. O'Leary. photo taken in 1901, during the SpanishAmerican war, in the Philppine Theater.
This is my great granduncle, Jonathan Edgar Dowis. He was the son of Jonathan and Eliza Ann (Sheets) Dowis. He was born 1873 Hebron, NE. The First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry was mustered into service on May 9-10, 1898 at Lincoln, Nebraska. At the time of muster-in, the unit consisted of fifty-one officers and 983 enlisted men. On June 15, the unit steamed for the Philippines, where it arrived on July 17. The fighting ended on August 13 with an armistice, and the war formally ended on December 10, 1898 with the signing of the Treaty of Paris. On February 4, 1899 the Philippine American War began. On July 1, 1899, the First Nebraska left the Philippines for the United States, arriving on July 29, 1899. The unit was mustered out of service on August 23, 1899 at San Francisco, California. At the time of muster out, the unit consisted of forty-five officers and 842 enlisted men. During its term of service, the 1st Nebraska lost two officers killed in battle with another officer dying from wounds received in battle. In addition nineteen enlisted men were killed in battle with thirteen additional men succumbing to wounds received in battle. Twenty-eight enlisted men died of disease, one man drowned and two men deserted. In total, eleven officers and 166 enlisted men were wounded in battle. I would love to hear from anyone who has information on this branch of my family! This photo was provided to me by my cousin Cecilia Heinz.
People in this photo:
Jul 13, 1873 - Unknown
Harry was born in Dublin, Ireland on Sunday, November 12, 1876 to Joseph and Catherine (nee Kearns) O'Keefe. In April 1883, when he was 6 years old, the four of them immigrated to the United States and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. Harry enlisted on September 19, 1898 when he was almost 22 years old and served until January 25, 1899 in "F" Troop, 2nd U.S. Calvary. After basic training and because the Spanish American war ended December 10, 1998, he was discharged in Huntsville, Alabama and returned to Cleveland. However, shortly after The Philippine Insurrection began in February 1999 he re-enlisted in Cleveland on March 13, 1899 in "M' Troop, 4th U.S. Calvary. He contracted malaria, suffered malnutrition and food poisoning while he served in the Philippines. After attaining the rank of sergeant was finally discharged on March 18, 1902 in California and then returned to Cleveland.
People in this photo:
Nov 12, 1876 - Unknown
Harry enlisted on September 19, 1898 when he was almost 22 years old and served until January 25, 1899 in "F" Troop, 2nd U.S. Calvary. After basic training and because the Spanish American war ended December 10, 1998, he was discharged in Huntsville, Alabama and returned to Cleveland. However, shortly after The Philippine Insurrection began in February 1999 he re-enlisted in Cleveland on March 13, 1899 in "M' Troop, 4th U.S. Calvary. His enlistment papers show his height as 5' 6½" and 5' 7¼" respectively with brown eyes on one document and blue eyes on the other. It seems they could agree on brown hair and fair complexion. It took six days to travel by train from Cleveland to the Presidio in San Francisco. On June 28, 1899, Harry shipped out on the troop transport "Valencia" which made a short stop in Honolulu on the way to the Philippines. The voyage took 32 days. Harry kept a journal almost daily from March 13, 1899 to May 12, 1900 and again from February 22 to March 13 in 1901. He chronicled what it was like serving during the Philippine Insurrection, which many still referred to as the Spanish-American War in the Philippines. It is very interesting reading. A copy of his journal has been transcribed and is available in computer readable form. His handwriting showed the artist in him and the journal is in excellent shape considering the severe conditions he endured during the war. He contracted malaria, suffered malnutrition and food poisoning while he served in the Philippines. This could explain some of the gaps in his journal. He also served in "G" Troop, 15th U.S. Calvary and after attaining the rank of sergeant was finally discharged on March 18, 1902 in California and then returned to Cleveland.
People in this photo:
Nov 12, 1876 - Unknown
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