Jeff McBride

Families researching: Armstrong, Brown, Bumpus, Carrier, Cotton, Davidson, Duff, Gill, Halloway, Kelly, Marshall, Martin, Mcbride, Stevens, Struthers, Taylor, Winans

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Jeff's Biographies

Abram Munson Cotton
Sep 15, 1833 - Aug 21, 1901
Alexander Cotton
Feb 4, 1801 - Oct 22, 1840
Alexander Davison
Born: Mar 22, 1821
Alexander McBride Jr
Mar 23, 1825 - Oct 3, 1906
Almyra Alice Brown
1896 - 1965
Andrew Allison
Apr 13, 1839 - Jan 7, 1934
Andrew Allison Sr
May 24, 1869 - Apr 30, 1950
Ann Armstrong
Aug 10, 1800 - Aug 19, 1848
Annie E Stevens
Jul 17, 1840 - Jun 21, 1910
Archibald Armstrong
Mar 6, 1785 - Jun 18, 1869
Benjamin Cotton
Born: around 1725
Bernice Irene Bumpus
Sep 4, 1895 - around 1987
Bernice Jane Bumpus
Dec 13, 1919 - Oct 17, 1985
Bertha E. Lindbergh
Nov 1, 1901 - May 6, 1998
Catherine Domer
Mar 22, 1825 - May 8, 1880
Catherine J. Parsons
May 2, 1838 - around 1838
Catherine Poe Harris
around 1800 - around 1901
Charlie Jacob Brown
May 17, 1886 - Aug 10, 1886
Dama Alice Brown
Mar 20, 1861 - May 18, 1919
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Jeff McBride His flotilla of bottles . . . tracked ocean currents By Elaine Woo Los Angeles For centuries people have launched bottles into the seas for sentimental reasons -- to preserve a paean to lost love, perhaps, or to feed a basic human desire to touch a soul in a distant land. Dean Bumpus did it for science -- and on a scale that likely has no rival. To track ocean currents, the scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts pitched tens of thousands of glass vessels into the Atlantic Ocean for 30 years, starting in 1948. " Break This Bottle, " the labels Mr. Bumpus affixed to them read. Inside each was a postcard asking the finder to reply with the date and place the bottle was found. In return, Mr. Bumpus sent a 50-cent reward. Although primitive, Mr. Bumpus' methodology enabled him to write a pioneering study of coastal circulation off the Eastern United States. " His bottle studies are monumental and, according to my studies, released more bottles than anyone," said Curtis Ebbesmeyer, a Seattle scientist who, as a byproduct of plotting the paths of ocean pollutants, became the country's foremost expert on high seas flotsam. " I greatly admired his work." No one knows exactly how many bottles were set adrift by Mr. Bumpus, who died March 14 at his home in Woods Hole after a distinguished 40-year career in oceanography. Known as " Bump " to his colleagues, he was 89. He once said that during the 1960s alone he or his conscripts flung 165,566 bottles from ships and planes along the East Coast. Ebbesmeyer suspects the total number throughout Mr. Bumpus' research well exceeded 200,000. Many were presumed sunk under the weight of barnacles that may have attached themselves to the bottles on the high seas. Despite such perils, the return rate during the '60s was about 10 percent -- some 16,000 bottles. Most were found along the 600-mile stretch of the Eastern Seaboard between Cape Hatteras and the tip of Maine. But some washed up in Ireland. One bottle got as far as Mediterranean Sea. In 1967, then - Vice President Hubert Humphrey dropped one of Bump's drifters from the institute's research vessel, Atlantis II, off Gloucester; Mass. It turned up just 20 miles away -- four years later. Another bottle was adrift for 33 years. No. 4653, launched from a research ship in the mid-Atlantic north of Bermuda in 1951, was returned to the institute in 1984 after it was found on a New Jersey beach. In all those years, Mr. Bumpus said, he was " held up " only once -- by a hard-bargaining woman in Vero Beach, Fla, who sniffed at his measly reward. " I have one of your bottles," she wrote. " I collect things of this sort when I find them. I also collect $2 bills. That is what it will take to get the number off this bottle and where I found it." Another time a man in Canada wrote a poem about one of the drift bottles. Mr. Bumpus tracked him down. He lived in a house with a dirt floor strewn with fish bones and other things. In a corner was a battered typewriter where the clam-digger poet had created his simple verse. He was " one of those fellows who liked to write, but no one would ever accept his stuff," Mr. Bumpus said. " Later, I wrote an article about it and I got paid $50 for it. I sent him $25 and he was delighted." Whenever Mr. Bumpus got a postcard back, he pondered the many varibles that shaped the bottle's journey. If the bottle was found on a beach, for instance, how long did it sit there before someone picked it up ? " There sre lots of subtleties in how to interpret the ' birth ' and ' death ' notice without knowing the life in between,"said Robert Beardsley, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole research center. Plotting the route of the bottles, however, led to Mr. Bumpus' finding that ocean currents south of Cape Hatteras move in very different patterns from those northward. " It was his genius," Beardsley said, " to make sense out of something that to us would seem very difficult to interpret." The result, according to flotsam specialist Ebbesmeyer, was " a pivotal data set for studying trans-Atlantic drift," useful to anyone trying to determine the path of an oil spill, for instance, or how certain plant slecies traveled from the Americas to Europe. Mr. Bumpus was born in Newburyport, Mass. He studied biology at Oberlin College, graduating in 1933. After graduate work at Brown University, he joined the staff of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 1937, becoming one of its first year-round employees. He also studied at Harvard College. In the late 1930s, he helped develop a comprehensive sampler of plankton life at the Georges Bank fishing ground off the Massachusetts coast. It continues to yield important findings today. During World war II, he was among a group of Woods Hole scientists who taught Navy submariners " how to play hide and seek " by using the temperature and density gradients of the water to avoid acoustic detection by enemy vessels. His bottle mania may ahve come from working closely with the institute's first director, Henry Bryant Bigelow, who used bottles to study ocean circulation as early as 1915. But the technique was not unique to either man. Theophrastus, the influential botanist of antiquity, was believed to have used glass bottles to map currents in the Mediterranean several centuries before Christ. What is probably safe to say is that neither ancient nor more modern mariners lent as much gusto to the hunt for bottles as Mr. Bumpus. In September 1959, Mr. Bumpus, an award-winning scoutmaster known for is hearty laugh, issued this memo to colleagues: " All hands are respectfully requested (until further notice) to bring their dead soldiers to the lab and deposit them in the box just inside the gate. Whiskey, rum, beer, wine or champagne bottles -- 8 oz. to one quart in size -- will be gratefully received. " Bottoms Up ! " He remained devoted to his bottles even when more sophiscated devices -- electronic current meters tracked by satellite -- became available. Mr. Bumpus retired in 1978. His bottles are still coming in. The Author of this web-site does not know the Family Tree connection to Mr. Bumpus, in the story that was written, nor how far back their connections meet. The Web-Site Author just liked the story. ( genealogy website - http://mysite.verizon.net/vze7tsc4 )
Mar 18, 2010 · posted to the surname Bumpus
Jeff McBride HERALD - Wednesday, October 4, 1911 McBride Family is Decended From Illustrious Stock Americans aregenerally spoken of as a people too busy in their mad pursuit for fame and money, to find time to gather together their family connections, make merry and reminisence over the times of the long ago. So it is with great pride that members of the McBride family which through the bustling war times, the times of death and the times of peace have clung together and met annually for the past 47 years. Their annual reunion was held this week, when the following history was read, that had been perpared by Mrs. Mary G. McBride Beisel of Wallace Avenue. Alexander and Mary Armstrong McBride are the ancestors in honor, and to the memory of whom the McBride family, their children and children's children gather annually in token of the love and reverance in which they are held. A history of the family and lives of these revered ones, seem fitting, that the younger generations being well informed of their memory as well as to become better acquainted, and to foster friendship among the present members of the family. Alexander McBride was born in Londonderry, county Tyrone, Ireland, December 20, 1795. When a young man of 18 *, he came to America and located on the Slipperyrock, in Worth Township, Butler county, and continued to live in that county until 1850. Data of his early life and family in Ireland is lacking except that it is known they were strict Presbyterians and that he left parents, brothers and sisters behind him when he emigrated to the new world of America, and for his age he was finely educated. An incident of his arrival in this country, as told by himself in after years, is worth repeating. After the long, tedious journey in those days on shipboard, the first thing sought upon his arrival in New York was an eating house. It is said of some people that "they do not know beans," but our young Irish ancestor "did know beans," but he had never seen green corn in the ear, and as he had arrived just at the season for tis delicious American delicacy, he was served with a luscious speciman, which he ate - as he saw others doing - with a relish, and when he had finished, he - who was nothing if not polite - turned to the waiter and requested him to "please sor, put some banes on my stick." He thought it was a new way of serving beans and that he could have the stick, as he called it, refilled upon request. But it did not take him long to fall into and adopt American customs. To the end of his days "he was the real old Irish gentleman," and had a warm love for his father-land, the green fields of Erin," and would speak lovingly of the dear parents and family he had left in his young manhood and whom he never saw again. For many years devoted his time to school teaching and bore the appellation of "The Irish Schoolmaster". While teaching one of these many schools, he found himself sucessfully "barred out" - as was a custom of the times - and his scholars in defiant possession of the house. After endeavoring in vain to get in at the door, he provided himself well with good tough rods, climbed to the roof and descended the chimney into the school room, in spite of the smoke, and the boys in their desperate efforts to drive him back up and out. It is supposed that before a final adjustment of the trouble was reached, the boys were sorry the door had been so thoroughly barred that they themselves were unable to speedily open it. Their irate "school master" was in and had his "Irish" up, and they themselves could not get out. Imagination will redily picture the scenes that followed. About sixty-five or seventy years ago he taught school in New Castle in a building where the electric light company is now located. It had formerly been a log church, and was one of the early churches of what is now the First Presbyterian church of New Castle. No doubt there are others of his old "scholars" here yet, the only ones we have personal knowledge of are C.C. Bamkey of New Castle, and his brother Henry, who acn relate interesting tales of those early days. He was a military man and at one time was a Colonel of a military organization, and that appalliation was given him through life by older persons. It was said of him "that in uniform and on horseback on muster days" his searing and tall commanding appearance showed him "every inch a soldier." Alexander McBride erected the first flouring or "grist mill" in that section in 1827. It was a frame structure and had two runs of common stone. After he got the grist mill in operation, he attached a sawmill and operated both until about 1850. In the earlier days, in that section, the majority of families provided for the grinding of their own grains by means of horse power, or hand mill, the process in either case being very unsatisfactory. Hence the building of a grist mill was a matter of common interest and the man of enterprise who erected one was looked upon as a public benefactor. He was a prominent man for many years and was sought as an adviser in various matters. On September 26, 1839, he was ordained elder in the Plaingrove Presbyterian church, one year after Rev. Munson resigned, and five months after Rev. Robert Walker was installed pastor. It is worthy of note that during the time he was elder (which was remainder of his life) five churches were organized from the mother church of Plaingrove, being Harlansburg, North Liberty, Rich Hill and Leesburg. To these are worthy of their mother. The old church as most of us know it, was built in 1834, the year R.M. McBride, the now senior member of the family was born. In 1852, Alexander McBride removed from Butler Co., to Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., and kept a dry goods store, which was discontinued in 1869. Associated with him were his sons, D.A. and Thomas. Between 1857- 1860, during James Buchanan's administration he had charge of the Post Office at Plain Grove, one mile north of the Presbyterian church and in connection with a general store, a branch of his store in Harlansburg. He was Justice of the Peace in Scott Township for many years and was known as Esquire Mcbride until his death. He was truly a "Just" and a "Peace" man. Whenever it was profitable to do so, he would try to bring the parties in litigation together and have an amicable settlement, which in those advanced days would be called "arbitration" and which he called "Justice from a Christian Standpoint." Alexander McBride died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son Robert Munson McBride, plain Grove, Lawrence Co., Pa., aged 82 years. 9 months and 24 days. But this history will not be completed without the early history of the family from which the wife and mother came. David Armstrong, with his son George, and his daughter, Rebecca, came to what was afterward North Township, Butler County, about 1794, from Westmoreland county. They accomplished their journey on horseback, bringing with them in this way as many household implements as was possible. It was impossible to travel with wagons, for at that time there were no roads, only bridle paths through the forests. They lived in a tent or sort of wigwam, such as the Indians built, until they constructed a cabin. In the fall of that year David and his daughter Rebecca returned to Westmoreland county after the remaining family, consisting of the mother and five children, whose names were Archibald, Thomas, Roland, Polly and David. Anna, Samuel and Elizabeth were born after they came to Butler county. These eight, with George and Rebecca previously mentioned, made a family of ten children; and I will just mention for the information of the present generation, who think they cannot live in less than ten or twelve rooms, three stories high, that this family among their ancestors, consisting of twelve persons, lived in a house of not more than two, possibly one, room. David Armstrong was the one of the most prominent men of the old pioneers. He was the first to suggest the establishing of a church in that section. The day was set for the people to meet to talk it over and arrange for the place to meet, David knew the meeting was to be held some place on the open, bushy plain, but he guessed where on that plain, for the plain was wide and long. So he came to the top of what was and is known as "Armstrong's Hill," and tried to see from there where the people were gathering, but he could not see out of the dense forests, so he climbed into the top of a tall tree and looked out over the intervening foliage, and sure enough, there, away to the north he saw the people, dodging around among the bushes, assembling. He descended from his squirral height to the bottom, and hastened to the meeting. Suffice to say, the church was established, and when they looked about for a name, the two oldest settlers present, David Armstrong and Thomas Taylor, were chosen a commitee to bring in and recommend a name for the church. They selected "Plain Grove," on account of the location, and "Plain Grove," it is to this day, and all succeeding generations of these said, old pioneer Christians have worshipped in it, but not they sit on cushioned seats instead of oak puncheons, standing on sound wooden logs. This David Armstrong, the moving spirit in those days, of whom we speak, was no stranger, but he was the grandfather of the McBride family, and great great grandfather to us all. His sons and daughters married into pioneer families like their own, whose names are household words. George, the eldest married, Elizabeth McCune, and settled near Centerville and died there. Rebecca married James McCune, the father of David McCune, and Rebecca Clark, recently deceased; Archibald married Elizabeth Wallace. He died at Plain Grove in 1869, 84 years old, and his wife, known as "Aunt Betsey Armstrong," died at the age of 100 years. Thomas married Fanny Drake. He lived and died on the farm where his father built his cabin. Roland married, and after living in various places, he finally located in Pittsburgh, and died there soon after the Cival War. His last child, Aunt Mary Boyd, died within the year, aged 85. David married Jane Jack, and was the father of our venerable and much esteemed cousin, Esther Pardon, who is the last of a large family. Anna married Samuel Jack, and was the mother od Lizzie Jack Ewing still living at a good old age. Samuel was married twice and died at Youngstown, Ohio. His youngest daughter Nancy is still in Youngstown. Elizabeth married William McNees and was known as Aunt Betsy McNees. She died not far from the old homestaed, where she was raised. Polly or Mary Armstrong was the link between the Armstrong and the McBride families and the old Bible contains the record that: On May 20, 1820, Alexander McBride and Mary Armstrong were married by Rev. John Munson at Slipperyrock, Butler County, Pennsylvania. After her death April 21, 1847, he wrote in the family record of the old family Bible that "We lived together 26 years, 10 months and 6 days in an agreeable happy manner. A loving tribute from the husband to the dear wife and mother, that was the helpmate and inspiration of his aspirations and enterprises and to this day to the children living, and as long as the others lived. "Mother" is and was a loved name to them. Unhapply no grand children ever knew her, and no son, or daughter-in-law and except the two sons, Robert and George D. present none who have come to honor her memory today, do so, from a personal knowledge, but from the reverence and love due a noble woman. We have prepared and if time permitted would read the record of all births, marriage and death dates that have occured in this family of nine children, the fruit of a happy marriage. Of the nine children, but three are living at this writing. These are Mrs. Sara Anna McBride Gill, on account of infirmities of age unable to be present; Robert M. of New Castle and George D. of Gallipolis, Ohio. Of these related by marriage, but two are living being Mrs. Thomas McBride of Jacksville, Butler Co., whose health will not permit her presence, so that where in early days eighteen or twenty of the 1st and 2nd generations would be present but three are with us today. These children were the fathers and mothers of the children and grand children comprising this reunion. To our mind it is eminently fitting that these fathers and mothers of the 2nd generation should be alike honored with the 1st generation, and each one as we come together at these meetings that they do so, in honor of their own dead parents, who have passed on, in the same loving spirit that they pay tribute to the beloved grand-parents. The history of the past few years indicates that where many more pass the celebrating of this annual trust, will devolve entirely on the "Children's Children." If we do this, these meetings will continue to increase in interest and each one will have the effect of drawing the family nearer together, heal all differences and bind with a stronger bond the ties of kinship. This is as our grandfathers and mothers would wish it to be and if it can that they can see an undivided family one and inseparable, meeting annually to their memory, it may be an added happiness to them. It is now almost a century since these reunions were instituted by father McBride. Let us hope that the Golden reunion of the 50th year will all those present who are with us today. * Mary G. McBride Beisel, Historian, July 13, 1911 *
Mar 16, 2010 · posted to the surname Mcbride
Jeff McBride Alexander McBride Sr., was born in County Down, Ireland, December 20, 1795 and died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son, Robert Munson McBride, Scott Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. he was married to * Mary (Polly) Armstrong *, May 20, 1820, and to Nancy McCaslin, June 1, 1848. Polly Armstrong McBride was born June 15, 1795 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died April 21, 1847. Nancy McCaslin McBride : ( the following is copied from the Bible of Alexander McBride ): " Nancy McBride, my wife, left my bed and board, November 3, 1873, after living together for 25 years, 5 months and 2 days, to live with he ronly son, Samuel McCaslin on his father's old farm, who furnished her a room to live in and took with her all things necessary for house - keeping which she chose, with her expectation of living with ease and comfort near her relations, rather than with me, which I hope and wish she may realize." Alexander Mcbride, after the separation, went to live with his son, Robert Munson McBride. Alexander McBride built the first flour mill in the district. It was located on ' Slippery Rock Creek ', just above where it is joined by Wolf Creek, and quite a large damn for power for the mill, - the damn a large area for storage of water. He secured water rights from owners of considerable land ajoining the creek. Many of the deeds for this same property even today mention that water right. He had considerable knowledge of engineering as practiced in those early days, and had much to do with the surveying of various lands which were taken up by settlers in the Eighteen Twenties. He later transported much freight by wagons drawn by four - and six - horse teams from what is now Harlansburg in Lawrence County to Pittsburgh before railways were built in Western Pennsylvania. He operated a general store in Harlansburg until just a few years before his death.
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person Robert Munson McBride
Jeff McBride Alexander McBride Sr., was born in County Down, Ireland, December 20, 1795 and died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son, Robert Munson McBride, Scott Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. he was married to * Mary (Polly) Armstrong *, May 20, 1820, and to Nancy McCaslin, June 1, 1848. Polly Armstrong McBride was born June 15, 1795 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died April 21, 1847. Nancy McCaslin McBride : ( the following is copied from the Bible of Alexander McBride ): " Nancy McBride, my wife, left my bed and board, November 3, 1873, after living together for 25 years, 5 months and 2 days, to live with he ronly son, Samuel McCaslin on his father's old farm, who furnished her a room to live in and took with her all things necessary for house - keeping which she chose, with her expectation of living with ease and comfort near her relations, rather than with me, which I hope and wish she may realize." Alexander Mcbride, after the separation, went to live with his son, Robert Munson McBride. Alexander McBride built the first flour mill in the district. It was located on ' Slippery Rock Creek ', just above where it is joined by Wolf Creek, and quite a large damn for power for the mill, - the damn a large area for storage of water. He secured water rights from owners of considerable land ajoining the creek. Many of the deeds for this same property even today mention that water right. He had considerable knowledge of engineering as practiced in those early days, and had much to do with the surveying of various lands which were taken up by settlers in the Eighteen Twenties. He later transported much freight by wagons drawn by four - and six - horse teams from what is now Harlansburg in Lawrence County to Pittsburgh before railways were built in Western Pennsylvania. He operated a general store in Harlansburg until just a few years before his death.
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person Mary (Armstrong) McBride
Jeff McBride Alexander McBride Sr., was born in County Down, Ireland, December 20, 1795 and died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son, Robert Munson McBride, Scott Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. he was married to * Mary (Polly) Armstrong *, May 20, 1820, and to Nancy McCaslin, June 1, 1848. Polly Armstrong McBride was born June 15, 1795 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died April 21, 1847. Nancy McCaslin McBride : ( the following is copied from the Bible of Alexander McBride ): " Nancy McBride, my wife, left my bed and board, November 3, 1873, after living together for 25 years, 5 months and 2 days, to live with he ronly son, Samuel McCaslin on his father's old farm, who furnished her a room to live in and took with her all things necessary for house - keeping which she chose, with her expectation of living with ease and comfort near her relations, rather than with me, which I hope and wish she may realize." Alexander Mcbride, after the separation, went to live with his son, Robert Munson McBride. Alexander McBride built the first flour mill in the district. It was located on ' Slippery Rock Creek ', just above where it is joined by Wolf Creek, and quite a large damn for power for the mill, - the damn a large area for storage of water. He secured water rights from owners of considerable land ajoining the creek. Many of the deeds for this same property even today mention that water right. He had considerable knowledge of engineering as practiced in those early days, and had much to do with the surveying of various lands which were taken up by settlers in the Eighteen Twenties. He later transported much freight by wagons drawn by four - and six - horse teams from what is now Harlansburg in Lawrence County to Pittsburgh before railways were built in Western Pennsylvania. He operated a general store in Harlansburg until just a few years before his death.
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person Alexander McBride
Jeff McBride McBride Family is Descended From Illustrious Stock HERALD - Wednesday, October 4, 1911 Americans are generally spoken of as a people too busy in their mad pursuit for fame and money, to find time to gather together their family connections, make merry and reminiscence over the times of the long ago. So it is with great pride that members of the McBride family which through the bustling war times, the times of death and the times of peace have clung together and met annually for the past 47 years. Their annual reunion was held this week, when the following history was read, that had been prepared by Mrs. Mary G. McBride Beisel of Wallace Avenue. Alexander and Mary Armstrong McBride are the ancestors in honor, and to the memory of whom the McBride family, their children and children's children gather annually in token of the love and reverance in which they are held. A history of the family and lives of these revered ones, seem fitting, that the younger generations being well informed of their memory as well as to become better acquainted, and to foster friendship among the present members of the family. Alexander McBride was born in Londonderry, county Tyrone, Ireland, December 20, 1795. When a young man of 18 *, he came to America and located on the Slipperyrock, in Worth Township, Butler county, and continued to live in that county until 1850. Data of his early life and family in Ireland is lacking except that it is known they were strict Presbyterians and that he left parents, brothers and sisters behind him when he emigrated to the new world of America, and for his age he was finely educated. An incident of his arrival in this country, as told by himself in after years, is worth repeating. After the long, tedious journey in those days on shipboard, the first thing sought upon his arrival in New York was an eating house. It is said of some people that "they do not know beans," but our young Irish ancestor "did know beans," but he had never seen green corn in the ear, and as he had arrived just at the season for tis delicious American delicacy, he was served with a luscious speciman, which he ate - as he saw others doing - with a relish, and when he had finished, he - who was nothing if not polite - turned to the waiter and requested him to "please sor, put some banes on my stick." He thought it was a new way of serving beans and that he could have the stick, as he called it, refilled upon request. But it did not take him long to fall into and adopt American customs. To the end of his days "he was the real old Irish gentleman," and had a warm love for his father-land, the green fields of Erin," and would speak lovingly of the dear parents and family he had left in his young manhood and whom he never saw again. For many years devoted his time to school teaching and bore the appellation of "The Irish Schoolmaster". While teaching one of these many schools, he found himself sucessfully "barred out" - as was a custom of the times - and his scholars in defiant possession of the house. After endeavoring in vain to get in at the door, he provided himself well with good tough rods, climbed to the roof and descended the chimney into the school room, in spite of the smoke, and the boys in their desperate efforts to drive him back up and out. It is supposed that before a final adjustment of the trouble was reached, the boys were sorry the door had been so thoroughly barred that they themselves were unable to speedily open it. Their irate "school master" was in and had his "Irish" up, and they themselves could not get out. Imagination will redily picture the scenes that followed. About sixty-five or seventy years ago he taught school in New Castle in a building where the electric light company is now located. It had formerly been a log church, and was one of the early churches of what is now the First Presbyterian church of New Castle. No doubt there are others of his old "scholars" here yet, the only ones we have personal knowledge of are C.C. Bamkey of New Castle, and his brother Henry, who can relate interesting tales of those early days. He was a military man and at one time was a Colonel of a military organization, and that appalliation was given him through life by older persons. It was said of him "that in uniform and on horseback on muster days" his searing and tall commanding appearance showed him "every inch a soldier." Alexander McBride erected the first flouring or "grist mill" in that section in 1827. It was a frame structure and had two runs of common stone. After he got the grist mill in operation, he attached a sawmill and operated both until about 1850. In the earlier days, in that section, the majority of families provided for the grinding of their own grains by means of horse power, or hand mill, the process in either case being very unsatisfactory. Hence the building of a grist mill was a matter of common interest and the man of enterprise who erected one was looked upon as a public benefactor. He was a prominent man for many years and was sought as an adviser in various matters. On September 26, 1839, he was ordained elder in the Plaingrove Presbyterian church, one year after Rev. Munson resigned, and five months after Rev. Robert Walker was installed pastor. It is worthy of note that during the time he was elder (which was remainder of his life) five churches were organized from the mother church of Plaingrove, being Harlansburg, North Liberty, Rich Hill and Leesburg. To these are worthy of their mother. The old church as most of us know it, was built in 1834, the year R.M. McBride, the now senior member of the family was born. In 1852, Alexander McBride removed from Butler Co., to Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., and kept a dry goods store, which was discontinued in 1869. Associated with him were his sons, D.A. and Thomas. Between 1857- 1860, during James Buchanan's administration he had charge of the Post Office at Plain Grove, one mile north of the Presbyterian church and in connection with a general store, a branch of his store in Harlansburg. He was Justice of the Peace in Scott Township for many years and was known as Esquire Mcbride until his death. He was truly a "Just" and a "Peace" man. Whenever it was profitable to do so, he would try to bring the parties in litigation together and have an amicable settlement, which in those advanced days would be called "arbitration" and which he called "Justice from a Christian Standpoint." Alexander McBride died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son Robert Munson McBride, plain Grove, Lawrence Co., Pa., aged 82 years. 9 months and 24 days. But this history will not be completed without the early history of the family from which the wife and mother came. David Armstrong, with his son George, and his daughter, Rebecca, came to what was afterward North Township, Butler County, about 1794, from Westmoreland county. They accomplished their journey on horseback, bringing with them in this way as many household implements as was possible. It was impossible to travel with wagons, for at that time there were no roads, only bridle paths through the forests. They lived in a tent or sort of wigwam, such as the Indians built, until they constructed a cabin. In the fall of that year David and his daughter Rebecca returned to Westmoreland county after the remaining family, consisting of the mother and five children, whose names were Archibald, Thomas, Roland, Polly and David. Anna, Samuel and Elizabeth were born after they came to Butler county. These eight, with George and Rebecca previously mentioned, made a family of ten children; and I will just mention for the information of the present generation, who think they cannot live in less than ten or twelve rooms, three stories high, that this family among their ancestors, consisting of twelve persons, lived in a house of not more than two, possibly one, room. David Armstrong was the one of the most prominent men of the old pioneers. He was the first to suggest the establishing of a church in that section. The day was set for the people to meet to talk it over and arrange for the place to meet, David knew the meeting was to be held some place on the open, bushy plain, but he guessed where on that plain, for the plain was wide and long. So he came to the top of what was and is known as "Armstrong's Hill," and tried to see from there where the people were gathering, but he could not see out of the dense forests, so he climbed into the top of a tall tree and looked out over the intervening foliage, and sure enough, there, away to the north he saw the people, dodging around among the bushes, assembling. He descended from his squirral height to the bottom, and hastened to the meeting. Suffice to say, the church was established, and when they looked about for a name, the two oldest settlers present, David Armstrong and Thomas Taylor, were chosen a commitee to bring in and recommend a name for the church. They selected "Plain Grove," on account of the location, and "Plain Grove," it is to this day, and all succeeding generations of these said, old pioneer Christians have worshipped in it, but not they sit on cushioned seats instead of oak puncheons, standing on sound wooden logs. This David Armstrong, the moving spirit in those days, of whom we speak, was no stranger, but he was the grandfather of the McBride family, and great great grandfather to us all. His sons and daughters married into pioneer families like their own, whose names are household words. George, the eldest married, Elizabeth McCune, and settled near Centerville and died there. Rebecca married James McCune, the father of David McCune, and Rebecca Clark, recently deceased; Archibald married Elizabeth Wallace. He died at Plain Grove in 1869, 84 years old, and his wife, known as "Aunt Betsey Armstrong," died at the age of 100 years. Thomas married Fanny Drake. He lived and died on the farm where his father built his cabin. Roland married, and after living in various places, he finally located in Pittsburgh, and died there soon after the Cival War. His last child, Aunt Mary Boyd, died within the year, aged 85. David married Jane Jack, and was the father of our venerable and much esteemed cousin, Esther Pardon, who is the last of a large family. Anna married Samuel Jack, and was the mother od Lizzie Jack Ewing still living at a good old age. Samuel was married twice and died at Youngstown, Ohio. His youngest daughter Nancy is still in Youngstown. Elizabeth married William McNees and was known as Aunt Betsy McNees. She died not far from the old homestaed, where she was raised. Polly or Mary Armstrong was the link between the Armstrong and the McBride families and the old Bible contains the record that: On May 20, 1820, Alexander McBride and Mary Armstrong were married by Rev. John Munson at Slipperyrock, Butler County, Pennsylvania. After her death April 21, 1847, he wrote in the family record of the old family Bible that "We lived together 26 years, 10 months and 6 days in an agreeable happy manner. A loving tribute from the husband to the dear wife and mother, that was the helpmate and inspiration of his aspirations and enterprises and to this day to the children living, and as long as the others lived. "Mother" is and was a loved name to them. Unhapply no grand children ever knew her, and no son, or daughter-in-law and except the two sons, Robert and George D. present none who have come to honor her memory today, do so, from a personal knowledge, but from the reverence and love due a noble woman. We have prepared and if time permitted would read the record of all births, marriage and death dates that have occured in this family of nine children, the fruit of a happy marriage. Of the nine children, but three are living at this writing. These are Mrs. Sara Anna McBride Gill, on account of infirmities of age unable to be present; Robert M. of New Castle and George D. of Gallipolis, Ohio. Of these related by marriage, but two are living being Mrs. Thomas McBride of Jacksville, Butler Co., whose health will not permit her presence, so that where in early days eighteen or twenty of the 1st and 2nd generations would be present but three are with us today. These children were the fathers and mothers of the children and grand children comprising this reunion. To our mind it is eminently fitting that these fathers and mothers of the 2nd generation should be alike honored with the 1st generation, and each one as we come together at these meetings that they do so, in honor of their own dead parents, who have passed on, in the same loving spirit that they pay tribute to the beloved grand-parents. The history of the past few years indicates that where many more pass the celebrating of this annual trust, will devolve entirely on the "Children's Children." If we do this, these meetings will continue to increase in interest and each one will have the effect of drawing the family nearer together, heal all differences and bind with a stronger bond the ties of kinship. This is as our grandfathers and mothers would wish it to be and if it can that they can see an undivided family one and inseparable, meeting annually to their memory, it may be an added happiness to them. It is now almost a century since these reunions were instituted by father McBride. Let us hope that the Golden reunion of the 50th year will all those present who are with us today. * Mary G. McBride Beisel, Historian, July 13, 1911 *
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person David Armstrong
Jeff McBride McBride Family is Descended From Illustrious Stock HERALD - Wednesday, October 4, 1911 Americans are generally spoken of as a people too busy in their mad pursuit for fame and money, to find time to gather together their family connections, make merry and reminiscence over the times of the long ago. So it is with great pride that members of the McBride family which through the bustling war times, the times of death and the times of peace have clung together and met annually for the past 47 years. Their annual reunion was held this week, when the following history was read, that had been prepared by Mrs. Mary G. McBride Beisel of Wallace Avenue. Alexander and Mary Armstrong McBride are the ancestors in honor, and to the memory of whom the McBride family, their children and children's children gather annually in token of the love and reverance in which they are held. A history of the family and lives of these revered ones, seem fitting, that the younger generations being well informed of their memory as well as to become better acquainted, and to foster friendship among the present members of the family. Alexander McBride was born in Londonderry, county Tyrone, Ireland, December 20, 1795. When a young man of 18 *, he came to America and located on the Slipperyrock, in Worth Township, Butler county, and continued to live in that county until 1850. Data of his early life and family in Ireland is lacking except that it is known they were strict Presbyterians and that he left parents, brothers and sisters behind him when he emigrated to the new world of America, and for his age he was finely educated. An incident of his arrival in this country, as told by himself in after years, is worth repeating. After the long, tedious journey in those days on shipboard, the first thing sought upon his arrival in New York was an eating house. It is said of some people that "they do not know beans," but our young Irish ancestor "did know beans," but he had never seen green corn in the ear, and as he had arrived just at the season for tis delicious American delicacy, he was served with a luscious speciman, which he ate - as he saw others doing - with a relish, and when he had finished, he - who was nothing if not polite - turned to the waiter and requested him to "please sor, put some banes on my stick." He thought it was a new way of serving beans and that he could have the stick, as he called it, refilled upon request. But it did not take him long to fall into and adopt American customs. To the end of his days "he was the real old Irish gentleman," and had a warm love for his father-land, the green fields of Erin," and would speak lovingly of the dear parents and family he had left in his young manhood and whom he never saw again. For many years devoted his time to school teaching and bore the appellation of "The Irish Schoolmaster". While teaching one of these many schools, he found himself sucessfully "barred out" - as was a custom of the times - and his scholars in defiant possession of the house. After endeavoring in vain to get in at the door, he provided himself well with good tough rods, climbed to the roof and descended the chimney into the school room, in spite of the smoke, and the boys in their desperate efforts to drive him back up and out. It is supposed that before a final adjustment of the trouble was reached, the boys were sorry the door had been so thoroughly barred that they themselves were unable to speedily open it. Their irate "school master" was in and had his "Irish" up, and they themselves could not get out. Imagination will redily picture the scenes that followed. About sixty-five or seventy years ago he taught school in New Castle in a building where the electric light company is now located. It had formerly been a log church, and was one of the early churches of what is now the First Presbyterian church of New Castle. No doubt there are others of his old "scholars" here yet, the only ones we have personal knowledge of are C.C. Bamkey of New Castle, and his brother Henry, who can relate interesting tales of those early days. He was a military man and at one time was a Colonel of a military organization, and that appalliation was given him through life by older persons. It was said of him "that in uniform and on horseback on muster days" his searing and tall commanding appearance showed him "every inch a soldier." Alexander McBride erected the first flouring or "grist mill" in that section in 1827. It was a frame structure and had two runs of common stone. After he got the grist mill in operation, he attached a sawmill and operated both until about 1850. In the earlier days, in that section, the majority of families provided for the grinding of their own grains by means of horse power, or hand mill, the process in either case being very unsatisfactory. Hence the building of a grist mill was a matter of common interest and the man of enterprise who erected one was looked upon as a public benefactor. He was a prominent man for many years and was sought as an adviser in various matters. On September 26, 1839, he was ordained elder in the Plaingrove Presbyterian church, one year after Rev. Munson resigned, and five months after Rev. Robert Walker was installed pastor. It is worthy of note that during the time he was elder (which was remainder of his life) five churches were organized from the mother church of Plaingrove, being Harlansburg, North Liberty, Rich Hill and Leesburg. To these are worthy of their mother. The old church as most of us know it, was built in 1834, the year R.M. McBride, the now senior member of the family was born. In 1852, Alexander McBride removed from Butler Co., to Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., and kept a dry goods store, which was discontinued in 1869. Associated with him were his sons, D.A. and Thomas. Between 1857- 1860, during James Buchanan's administration he had charge of the Post Office at Plain Grove, one mile north of the Presbyterian church and in connection with a general store, a branch of his store in Harlansburg. He was Justice of the Peace in Scott Township for many years and was known as Esquire Mcbride until his death. He was truly a "Just" and a "Peace" man. Whenever it was profitable to do so, he would try to bring the parties in litigation together and have an amicable settlement, which in those advanced days would be called "arbitration" and which he called "Justice from a Christian Standpoint." Alexander McBride died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son Robert Munson McBride, plain Grove, Lawrence Co., Pa., aged 82 years. 9 months and 24 days. But this history will not be completed without the early history of the family from which the wife and mother came. David Armstrong, with his son George, and his daughter, Rebecca, came to what was afterward North Township, Butler County, about 1794, from Westmoreland county. They accomplished their journey on horseback, bringing with them in this way as many household implements as was possible. It was impossible to travel with wagons, for at that time there were no roads, only bridle paths through the forests. They lived in a tent or sort of wigwam, such as the Indians built, until they constructed a cabin. In the fall of that year David and his daughter Rebecca returned to Westmoreland county after the remaining family, consisting of the mother and five children, whose names were Archibald, Thomas, Roland, Polly and David. Anna, Samuel and Elizabeth were born after they came to Butler county. These eight, with George and Rebecca previously mentioned, made a family of ten children; and I will just mention for the information of the present generation, who think they cannot live in less than ten or twelve rooms, three stories high, that this family among their ancestors, consisting of twelve persons, lived in a house of not more than two, possibly one, room. David Armstrong was the one of the most prominent men of the old pioneers. He was the first to suggest the establishing of a church in that section. The day was set for the people to meet to talk it over and arrange for the place to meet, David knew the meeting was to be held some place on the open, bushy plain, but he guessed where on that plain, for the plain was wide and long. So he came to the top of what was and is known as "Armstrong's Hill," and tried to see from there where the people were gathering, but he could not see out of the dense forests, so he climbed into the top of a tall tree and looked out over the intervening foliage, and sure enough, there, away to the north he saw the people, dodging around among the bushes, assembling. He descended from his squirral height to the bottom, and hastened to the meeting. Suffice to say, the church was established, and when they looked about for a name, the two oldest settlers present, David Armstrong and Thomas Taylor, were chosen a commitee to bring in and recommend a name for the church. They selected "Plain Grove," on account of the location, and "Plain Grove," it is to this day, and all succeeding generations of these said, old pioneer Christians have worshipped in it, but not they sit on cushioned seats instead of oak puncheons, standing on sound wooden logs. This David Armstrong, the moving spirit in those days, of whom we speak, was no stranger, but he was the grandfather of the McBride family, and great great grandfather to us all. His sons and daughters married into pioneer families like their own, whose names are household words. George, the eldest married, Elizabeth McCune, and settled near Centerville and died there. Rebecca married James McCune, the father of David McCune, and Rebecca Clark, recently deceased; Archibald married Elizabeth Wallace. He died at Plain Grove in 1869, 84 years old, and his wife, known as "Aunt Betsey Armstrong," died at the age of 100 years. Thomas married Fanny Drake. He lived and died on the farm where his father built his cabin. Roland married, and after living in various places, he finally located in Pittsburgh, and died there soon after the Cival War. His last child, Aunt Mary Boyd, died within the year, aged 85. David married Jane Jack, and was the father of our venerable and much esteemed cousin, Esther Pardon, who is the last of a large family. Anna married Samuel Jack, and was the mother od Lizzie Jack Ewing still living at a good old age. Samuel was married twice and died at Youngstown, Ohio. His youngest daughter Nancy is still in Youngstown. Elizabeth married William McNees and was known as Aunt Betsy McNees. She died not far from the old homestaed, where she was raised. Polly or Mary Armstrong was the link between the Armstrong and the McBride families and the old Bible contains the record that: On May 20, 1820, Alexander McBride and Mary Armstrong were married by Rev. John Munson at Slipperyrock, Butler County, Pennsylvania. After her death April 21, 1847, he wrote in the family record of the old family Bible that "We lived together 26 years, 10 months and 6 days in an agreeable happy manner. A loving tribute from the husband to the dear wife and mother, that was the helpmate and inspiration of his aspirations and enterprises and to this day to the children living, and as long as the others lived. "Mother" is and was a loved name to them. Unhapply no grand children ever knew her, and no son, or daughter-in-law and except the two sons, Robert and George D. present none who have come to honor her memory today, do so, from a personal knowledge, but from the reverence and love due a noble woman. We have prepared and if time permitted would read the record of all births, marriage and death dates that have occured in this family of nine children, the fruit of a happy marriage. Of the nine children, but three are living at this writing. These are Mrs. Sara Anna McBride Gill, on account of infirmities of age unable to be present; Robert M. of New Castle and George D. of Gallipolis, Ohio. Of these related by marriage, but two are living being Mrs. Thomas McBride of Jacksville, Butler Co., whose health will not permit her presence, so that where in early days eighteen or twenty of the 1st and 2nd generations would be present but three are with us today. These children were the fathers and mothers of the children and grand children comprising this reunion. To our mind it is eminently fitting that these fathers and mothers of the 2nd generation should be alike honored with the 1st generation, and each one as we come together at these meetings that they do so, in honor of their own dead parents, who have passed on, in the same loving spirit that they pay tribute to the beloved grand-parents. The history of the past few years indicates that where many more pass the celebrating of this annual trust, will devolve entirely on the "Children's Children." If we do this, these meetings will continue to increase in interest and each one will have the effect of drawing the family nearer together, heal all differences and bind with a stronger bond the ties of kinship. This is as our grandfathers and mothers would wish it to be and if it can that they can see an undivided family one and inseparable, meeting annually to their memory, it may be an added happiness to them. It is now almost a century since these reunions were instituted by father McBride. Let us hope that the Golden reunion of the 50th year will all those present who are with us today. * Mary G. McBride Beisel, Historian, July 13, 1911 *
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person Mary (Armstrong) McBride
Jeff McBride McBride Family is Descended From Illustrious Stock HERALD - Wednesday, October 4, 1911 Americans are generally spoken of as a people too busy in their mad pursuit for fame and money, to find time to gather together their family connections, make merry and reminiscence over the times of the long ago. So it is with great pride that members of the McBride family which through the bustling war times, the times of death and the times of peace have clung together and met annually for the past 47 years. Their annual reunion was held this week, when the following history was read, that had been prepared by Mrs. Mary G. McBride Beisel of Wallace Avenue. Alexander and Mary Armstrong McBride are the ancestors in honor, and to the memory of whom the McBride family, their children and children's children gather annually in token of the love and reverance in which they are held. A history of the family and lives of these revered ones, seem fitting, that the younger generations being well informed of their memory as well as to become better acquainted, and to foster friendship among the present members of the family. Alexander McBride was born in Londonderry, county Tyrone, Ireland, December 20, 1795. When a young man of 18 *, he came to America and located on the Slipperyrock, in Worth Township, Butler county, and continued to live in that county until 1850. Data of his early life and family in Ireland is lacking except that it is known they were strict Presbyterians and that he left parents, brothers and sisters behind him when he emigrated to the new world of America, and for his age he was finely educated. An incident of his arrival in this country, as told by himself in after years, is worth repeating. After the long, tedious journey in those days on shipboard, the first thing sought upon his arrival in New York was an eating house. It is said of some people that "they do not know beans," but our young Irish ancestor "did know beans," but he had never seen green corn in the ear, and as he had arrived just at the season for tis delicious American delicacy, he was served with a luscious speciman, which he ate - as he saw others doing - with a relish, and when he had finished, he - who was nothing if not polite - turned to the waiter and requested him to "please sor, put some banes on my stick." He thought it was a new way of serving beans and that he could have the stick, as he called it, refilled upon request. But it did not take him long to fall into and adopt American customs. To the end of his days "he was the real old Irish gentleman," and had a warm love for his father-land, the green fields of Erin," and would speak lovingly of the dear parents and family he had left in his young manhood and whom he never saw again. For many years devoted his time to school teaching and bore the appellation of "The Irish Schoolmaster". While teaching one of these many schools, he found himself sucessfully "barred out" - as was a custom of the times - and his scholars in defiant possession of the house. After endeavoring in vain to get in at the door, he provided himself well with good tough rods, climbed to the roof and descended the chimney into the school room, in spite of the smoke, and the boys in their desperate efforts to drive him back up and out. It is supposed that before a final adjustment of the trouble was reached, the boys were sorry the door had been so thoroughly barred that they themselves were unable to speedily open it. Their irate "school master" was in and had his "Irish" up, and they themselves could not get out. Imagination will redily picture the scenes that followed. About sixty-five or seventy years ago he taught school in New Castle in a building where the electric light company is now located. It had formerly been a log church, and was one of the early churches of what is now the First Presbyterian church of New Castle. No doubt there are others of his old "scholars" here yet, the only ones we have personal knowledge of are C.C. Bamkey of New Castle, and his brother Henry, who can relate interesting tales of those early days. He was a military man and at one time was a Colonel of a military organization, and that appalliation was given him through life by older persons. It was said of him "that in uniform and on horseback on muster days" his searing and tall commanding appearance showed him "every inch a soldier." Alexander McBride erected the first flouring or "grist mill" in that section in 1827. It was a frame structure and had two runs of common stone. After he got the grist mill in operation, he attached a sawmill and operated both until about 1850. In the earlier days, in that section, the majority of families provided for the grinding of their own grains by means of horse power, or hand mill, the process in either case being very unsatisfactory. Hence the building of a grist mill was a matter of common interest and the man of enterprise who erected one was looked upon as a public benefactor. He was a prominent man for many years and was sought as an adviser in various matters. On September 26, 1839, he was ordained elder in the Plaingrove Presbyterian church, one year after Rev. Munson resigned, and five months after Rev. Robert Walker was installed pastor. It is worthy of note that during the time he was elder (which was remainder of his life) five churches were organized from the mother church of Plaingrove, being Harlansburg, North Liberty, Rich Hill and Leesburg. To these are worthy of their mother. The old church as most of us know it, was built in 1834, the year R.M. McBride, the now senior member of the family was born. In 1852, Alexander McBride removed from Butler Co., to Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., and kept a dry goods store, which was discontinued in 1869. Associated with him were his sons, D.A. and Thomas. Between 1857- 1860, during James Buchanan's administration he had charge of the Post Office at Plain Grove, one mile north of the Presbyterian church and in connection with a general store, a branch of his store in Harlansburg. He was Justice of the Peace in Scott Township for many years and was known as Esquire Mcbride until his death. He was truly a "Just" and a "Peace" man. Whenever it was profitable to do so, he would try to bring the parties in litigation together and have an amicable settlement, which in those advanced days would be called "arbitration" and which he called "Justice from a Christian Standpoint." Alexander McBride died October 14, 1878, at the residence of his son Robert Munson McBride, plain Grove, Lawrence Co., Pa., aged 82 years. 9 months and 24 days. But this history will not be completed without the early history of the family from which the wife and mother came. David Armstrong, with his son George, and his daughter, Rebecca, came to what was afterward North Township, Butler County, about 1794, from Westmoreland county. They accomplished their journey on horseback, bringing with them in this way as many household implements as was possible. It was impossible to travel with wagons, for at that time there were no roads, only bridle paths through the forests. They lived in a tent or sort of wigwam, such as the Indians built, until they constructed a cabin. In the fall of that year David and his daughter Rebecca returned to Westmoreland county after the remaining family, consisting of the mother and five children, whose names were Archibald, Thomas, Roland, Polly and David. Anna, Samuel and Elizabeth were born after they came to Butler county. These eight, with George and Rebecca previously mentioned, made a family of ten children; and I will just mention for the information of the present generation, who think they cannot live in less than ten or twelve rooms, three stories high, that this family among their ancestors, consisting of twelve persons, lived in a house of not more than two, possibly one, room. David Armstrong was the one of the most prominent men of the old pioneers. He was the first to suggest the establishing of a church in that section. The day was set for the people to meet to talk it over and arrange for the place to meet, David knew the meeting was to be held some place on the open, bushy plain, but he guessed where on that plain, for the plain was wide and long. So he came to the top of what was and is known as "Armstrong's Hill," and tried to see from there where the people were gathering, but he could not see out of the dense forests, so he climbed into the top of a tall tree and looked out over the intervening foliage, and sure enough, there, away to the north he saw the people, dodging around among the bushes, assembling. He descended from his squirral height to the bottom, and hastened to the meeting. Suffice to say, the church was established, and when they looked about for a name, the two oldest settlers present, David Armstrong and Thomas Taylor, were chosen a commitee to bring in and recommend a name for the church. They selected "Plain Grove," on account of the location, and "Plain Grove," it is to this day, and all succeeding generations of these said, old pioneer Christians have worshipped in it, but not they sit on cushioned seats instead of oak puncheons, standing on sound wooden logs. This David Armstrong, the moving spirit in those days, of whom we speak, was no stranger, but he was the grandfather of the McBride family, and great great grandfather to us all. His sons and daughters married into pioneer families like their own, whose names are household words. George, the eldest married, Elizabeth McCune, and settled near Centerville and died there. Rebecca married James McCune, the father of David McCune, and Rebecca Clark, recently deceased; Archibald married Elizabeth Wallace. He died at Plain Grove in 1869, 84 years old, and his wife, known as "Aunt Betsey Armstrong," died at the age of 100 years. Thomas married Fanny Drake. He lived and died on the farm where his father built his cabin. Roland married, and after living in various places, he finally located in Pittsburgh, and died there soon after the Cival War. His last child, Aunt Mary Boyd, died within the year, aged 85. David married Jane Jack, and was the father of our venerable and much esteemed cousin, Esther Pardon, who is the last of a large family. Anna married Samuel Jack, and was the mother od Lizzie Jack Ewing still living at a good old age. Samuel was married twice and died at Youngstown, Ohio. His youngest daughter Nancy is still in Youngstown. Elizabeth married William McNees and was known as Aunt Betsy McNees. She died not far from the old homestaed, where she was raised. Polly or Mary Armstrong was the link between the Armstrong and the McBride families and the old Bible contains the record that: On May 20, 1820, Alexander McBride and Mary Armstrong were married by Rev. John Munson at Slipperyrock, Butler County, Pennsylvania. After her death April 21, 1847, he wrote in the family record of the old family Bible that "We lived together 26 years, 10 months and 6 days in an agreeable happy manner. A loving tribute from the husband to the dear wife and mother, that was the helpmate and inspiration of his aspirations and enterprises and to this day to the children living, and as long as the others lived. "Mother" is and was a loved name to them. Unhapply no grand children ever knew her, and no son, or daughter-in-law and except the two sons, Robert and George D. present none who have come to honor her memory today, do so, from a personal knowledge, but from the reverence and love due a noble woman. We have prepared and if time permitted would read the record of all births, marriage and death dates that have occured in this family of nine children, the fruit of a happy marriage. Of the nine children, but three are living at this writing. These are Mrs. Sara Anna McBride Gill, on account of infirmities of age unable to be present; Robert M. of New Castle and George D. of Gallipolis, Ohio. Of these related by marriage, but two are living being Mrs. Thomas McBride of Jacksville, Butler Co., whose health will not permit her presence, so that where in early days eighteen or twenty of the 1st and 2nd generations would be present but three are with us today. These children were the fathers and mothers of the children and grand children comprising this reunion. To our mind it is eminently fitting that these fathers and mothers of the 2nd generation should be alike honored with the 1st generation, and each one as we come together at these meetings that they do so, in honor of their own dead parents, who have passed on, in the same loving spirit that they pay tribute to the beloved grand-parents. The history of the past few years indicates that where many more pass the celebrating of this annual trust, will devolve entirely on the "Children's Children." If we do this, these meetings will continue to increase in interest and each one will have the effect of drawing the family nearer together, heal all differences and bind with a stronger bond the ties of kinship. This is as our grandfathers and mothers would wish it to be and if it can that they can see an undivided family one and inseparable, meeting annually to their memory, it may be an added happiness to them. It is now almost a century since these reunions were instituted by father McBride. Let us hope that the Golden reunion of the 50th year will all those present who are with us today. * Mary G. McBride Beisel, Historian, July 13, 1911 *
Sep 20, 2014 · posted to the person Alexander McBride
Jeff McBride Family Legacy of Alexander and Mary Armstrong: Born December 20, 1795,a native of Emerald Isle, Ireland. He emigrated in 1813. He Married Mary Armstrong, daughter of David and Sarah (Harris) Armstrong, May 20, 1820. She was born June 25, 1795, and died April 21, 1847. They purchased a farm near London, Mercer County, where they resided four years. Then they purchased a part of the old Armstrong farm, which laid on both sides of the present Slippery Rock road, the old homestead being the present Boyd farm, near the Cooper cement block plant. The McBride tract also laid on both sides of the present Slippery Rock road, the home being on the north side of the road and southeast of a spring in the field between the present Boyd and Cooper homes. Some say the home was a log house, but Mr. Crocker, a nearby resident, says it was a frame dwelling. A barn and a blacksmith shop were on the south side of the road. After locating on this tract, Mr. McBride devoted his time to school teaching and milling. He bore the appellation of the "Irish Schoolmaster." The first grist mill erected and operated within the present limits of Worth Township was erected by Mr. McBride in 1827. It was a frame structure and had two run of common stone. Soon after he got the gristmill in operation, he attached a saw mill, and did a flourishing business for some 25 years until 1850. His mill was located along the Slippery Rock Creek by the bridge near the present Cooper gravel washing plant. Tradition says that the foundation of the present bridge was part of the old mill. Mr. McBride was a prominent man in the township in educational matters and in business enterprises, and filled the office of Justice of the Peace for several terms. Kept store at Harlansburg for several years during the latter part of his life. Ordained Elder September 26, 1839, and served for 39 years. He died October 17, 1878, leaving a family of nine children. David Armstrong (m. Elizabeth Struthers), Rebecca Jane, (m. Amaziah Kelly), Alexander Jr. (Harlansburg), Thomas (m. Eliza Winans), Sarah Ann (m. Samuel Gill), William (m. Eliza Taylor), Robert Munson (m. Sarah Jane Martin), George Dennison (m. Annie Stevens), and Samuel J. (m. Mary D. Cotton), Samuel J. lived in the East Brook area (buried at Rich Hill) and had a son, Edward A., who married Lydia A. Allison, they were the parents of Ralph A. McBride, who married Margaret E. Book.
Sep 21, 2014 · posted to the person Samuel J. McBride
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